LabourList leadership poll: The results

May 13, 2010 10:31 am

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By Alex Smith / @alexsmith1982

David Miliband (27.7%) is favoured to become the next leader of the Labour Party amongst LabourList readers, with Ed Miliband (16%) in second and Jon Cruddas (11.1%) in third. Ed Balls polled 7.2% of readers as preferred potential candidate for the leadership, while John McDonnell, who didn’t feature on the original list of options but who received a significant number of write-in votes, came fifth with 6.7%. Harriet Harman polled sixth, with 4.6% of the 1,111 people who took part in the straw poll yesterday afternoon.

LEadership chart

The full results are as follows:

Douglas Alexander 0.5%
Ed Balls 7.2%
Ben Bradshaw 1.8%
Hilary Benn 2.0%
Andy Burnham 2.9%
Yvette Cooper 3.7%
Jon Cruddas 11.1%
Alistair Darling 2.2%
John Denham 0.4%
Harriet Harman 4.6%
Alan Johnson 3.1%
Tessa Jowell 1.3%
David Miliband 27.7%
Ed Miliband 16.0%
Jack Straw 1.0%
Shaun Woodward 1.4%

Respondents who oppose the renewal of Trident favour Ed Miliband over his brother David. 19.6% of those who oppose Trident’s renewal want to see Ed Miliband as leader while 17.5% support David Miliband. 15.7% of that category prefer Jon Cruddas.

Respondents who support the introduction of proportional representation prefer David Milband (25.7%) over Ed Miliband (17.6%), while Jon Cruddas is favoured by 15.3% of people who wish to see PR.

20.7% of readers who favour the immediate withdrawal of troops from Afghanistan would like to see David Miliband as leader, with 15.1% preferring Ed Miliband and 13.2% favouring Jon Cruddas.

Proponents of some form of primary to select Labour candidates prefer David Miliband (32.3%) by almost two to one over his brother Ed (16.3%), with 9.4% supporting Cruddas.

Amongst union members, the contest is tighter, with 20.8% supporting David Miliband, 18.1% supporting Ed Miliband and 13.7% supporting Jon Cruddas. 7.8% of union members polled would like to see Ed Balls as leader.

Women preferred David Miliband to Ed Miliband by 24.1% to 13.4%, with 5.9% preferring Jon Cruddas. Men prefer David over Ed by 28.7% to 17.6%, with 12.4% of men preferring Cruddas. Women prefer Yvette Cooper over Ed Balls, by 5.9% to 5.3%.

29.2% of Londoners prefer David Miliband compared with 24.9% who prefer Ed Miliband. 11.6% of Londoners polled wish to see Jon Cruddas as leader, while 5.4 % prefer Ed Balls. 9% of Londoners support John McDonnell.

In the North West, 28% of respondents would like to see David Miliband as leader, with 11.8% preferring Ed Miliband. Andy Burnham has notable support in the North West, receiving 10.8% of the vote there. Ed Balls polls 7.5% in that region.

In the North East, Jon Cruddas is the second most popular potential candidate (17%) after David Miliband (29.8%), with Ed Miliband receiving 8.5% of that vote.

In Yorkshire, David Miliband is favoured by 27.4%, while Ed Miliband is favoured by 17.9% and Jon Cruddas by 13.1%, with Ed Balls on 17.1%. In Scotland, David (20.8%) is slightly ahead of Ed (17%), with Jon Cruddas on 9.4%. In Wales, David Miliband is the choice of 37% of respondents, with Ed Miliband receiving 11.1% of that vote and Jon Cruddas, Yvette Cooper and Ben Bradshaw each receiving 7.4%.

These polls will be taken weekly throughout the leadership campaign. As a field of declared candidates is announced, we also be able to extrapolate the main areas of policy and organisational concern of respondents who support any individual declared candidate.

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