Heseltine to attack 50p tax cut?

March 22, 2012 11:13 am

Earlier this week on LabourList, Chuka Umunna told Mark Ferguson:

“When I was in the chamber for the statement on the European Council in December…one of my colleagues, backbench colleagues, mentioned Heseltine – used Heseltine against Cameron – and the whole of the Tory backbenches jeered the mention of his name. I thought this is quite remarkable, here’s one of the most popular Conservative politicians in the country being jeered by his own side.”

Yesterday in the budget, George Osborne had words of praise (and a new job) for Heseltine:

“The Business Secretary and I have asked Michael Heseltine to review by the Autumn how Government spending departments and other public bodies can work better with the private sector on economic development. From Liverpool to Canary Wharf, Michael knows how it’s done.”

Yet today:

Heseltine will make his maiden speech in the Lords ELEVEN YEARS after entering the upper chamber. It is believed that he will criticise Osborne’s 50p tax cut.

  • Winston_from_the_Ministry

    It’s simple, Chuka talks shiite.

    • Chilbaldi

      on what basis?

  • RedHeadPeter

    Yes, just look what he did for Liverpool…..still at the top of the multiple-deprivation index, so clearly a huge success.

    • Chilbaldi

      at least he cared. As opposed to others in that cabinet who proposed abandoning Liverpool and leaving it to the sewer rats.

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