Cameron’s plummeting popularity

29th April, 2012 10:30 am

The Tories have fallen below the symbolic 30 point mark today with YouGov – but it’s worse than that. Many Tories had consoled themselves that David Cameron’s personal ratings might suggest a more positive outlook.

Not anymore.

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(h/t: PoliticalBetting)

  • aracataca

    Approval rating still only -42. Eagerly awaiting an approval rating of -57 which IMHO would be irrecoverable and which is needed to withstand the personal abuse which will be hurled at EM before and during the next general election campaign

  • TomFairfax

    The irony of course is that it’s George Osborne mainly responsible for this step change.
    The budget wouldn’t have registered at all if he’d simply not made the cut in the tax rate for the highest earners.
    It was George Osborne who persuaded DC to hold his nose and cosy up to News International, and take on Coulson as an advisor.

    Over the last few decades, 29% is the absolute floor for Tory support. If that were to change and be reflected in the council elections then I think we’d see the distinctly non-Cameroon  Conservative back benchers doing what a bunch of individualists does best whenever subjected to external pressure, and becoming a herd of cats.

    • Chris Cook

      @TomFairfax:disqus 

      Well actually, taking a Labour-centric approach to value is convenient to the Greed Tendency in power.

      This is because such an approach justifies limiting taxation to consumption and to individual capacity to provide goods and services.

      It ignores the use value over time of privileged property rights over productive assets, and the economic rents – ie unearned income or gains – which are received by those own them.

      • TomFairfax

         Hi Chris,
                           I hope you’re well.

        Unfortunately the ‘Greed Tendency’ and that view of taxing today’s declared  transitory income, not the sustained total increase in wealth on a longer timescale, aren’t confined to one party.

        As we’ve seen, a lot of them are in the pockets of those with most to lose from taxation based on timescales greater than 12months. It’s necessary to make a break from siding with a person with the ability to write cheques to buy protection of their wealth to any politician,  instead of to the Crown as revenue.

        It might be harder to defend defrauding the Crown, than defrauding the revenue, but I think Labour would find it difficult to put it in those terms even if it left some of the more embarrassing Pro-Monarchy, low/no taxation, chicken hawk crowd tying themselves in knots to defend their contradictory views.

  • TomFairfax

    moved comment. Wrong place.

  • TomFairfax

    Oh brilliant. I now why it still say’s ‘beta’ on the main page.

  • Chrissieoap

    Why do people like Andrew Neil keep telling the public via his Daily and Sunday politics shows the opposite of what is really taking place in the country?
    Today on Sunday politics he brought up nothing but negative comments about Ed. Miliband whilst he was interviewing Harriet Harman?
    No wonder the public no longer have trust in our political system, there is too much unfairness by the political elite commentators in our broadcasting media.

    • GuyM

      What positive to say about Ed Milliband?

      He doesn’t have any policies, looks like a startled badger in the headlights and is possibly about to lose London and Glasgow.

      Hattie Harperson though does make him look attractive by comparison

      • RedSetter

        “What positive to say about Ed Milliband?”

        He’s not David Cameron.

    • Hugh

      The  figures for Ed Milband in the poll referred to are: Well 27%; badly 65%. Andrew Neil is reflecting the reality.

    • aracataca

      It might be because he’s a Tory.

  • JoeDM

    Time for the wet Cameron to go and a real Tory to take his place.
     

    • RedSetter

      Like who? Give us an example. Please.

      • http://twitter.com/gonzozzz dave stone

        JoeDM wants to vote for Nigel Farage but doesn’t have the courage to switch parties.

        One thing to be said in Nigel’s favour is that he probably understands how to order a pint in a pub. Cameron, on the otherhand, would walk in, sit down and then, in a loud voice, demand a bottle of 1970 Chateau Petrus.

  • RedSetter

    Cameron promised solutions to the nation’s problems which most of us knew were undeliverable. For example he promised to cut welfare spending without hurting anyone because those who could work would be placed in gainful employment and those that couldn’t work would be protected and kept safe from harm. He promised to reduce the deficit to zero in one Parliament (already shown to be a lie), restructure and get the economy moving again without the need for a stimulus (currently being shown to be a lie), and transform our society into a “Big Society” where we all helped each other out of the goodness of our hearts and provided a swathe of service, gratis, that were formerly catered for by the state so enabling the state to shrink and cost less overall (obviously a lie). All the people sacked from the private sector would be absorbed into equally well paid jobs in the private sector (lie), a quarter of a million new social homes would be built (lie), more would be achieved by spending less and everything in the garden would be lovely (whopper).

    Blah… blah… blah.

    Lie… fib… fabrication.

    If Cameron is beginning to see his popularity waning now just wait until the British people fully realise what a bogus false  prospectus he offered them and was elected because of as the awful truth dawns in the coming years.

    • Dante

      Once a politician’s popularity starts to slide like this it’s almost always the start of a one-way plunge from which there is no escape or hope of improvement. Cameron did well to remain superficially popular for so long by a mixture of bullshit and flimflam but now, as policies begin to fail and topple like ninepins, is finally being seen for what he is. If only the Labour party had a more plausible leader and shadow cabinet a win at the next general election would be in the bag, despite the gerrymandering as per the boundary changes the Tories are trying to rush through.   

  • MattWales

    Milliband really needs to get his own approval ratings up, otherwise we risk ending up in a situation where a abysmal government hangs on in because the opposition just doesnt appeal.
    I live in slightly sceptical hope as its getting a bit late to pick a new leader.

    • http://www.pauldouglasonline.net Paul Douglas

      Miliband’s rating is trending upwards in inverse proportion to Cameron’s (Somewhat unsurprisingly of course) and is already getting close to matching it. Depending on what happens, Ed could surge ahead within the next month.

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