Tory MP threatens Cameron – says it is “becoming more difficult to remain so loyal”

10th May, 2012 11:56 am

Another not so coded warning to the PM from his backbenchers. This time from Monmouth MP David Davies:

“David Cameron needs to change his tact very rapidly other wise he’s not going to be in position for very long.”  

“I am sure he realises his supporters are not happy with what’s going on.”

“If I sound like I’m being critical I am. I have been a been loyal for the last couple of years, although I have voted against the government on certain things like the EU referendum question, but there comes a point when it is becoming more difficult to remain so loyal.”

  • AlanGiles

    This is the male Nadine Dorries, isn’t it?, the attention-seeking anti-PC MP who is desperate to be heard on radio.

    The worrying thing is that we have about the most right-wing government since Mrs. Thatcher – in some ways more right-wing than her, yet it still isn’t right-wing enough for some headbangers like Davies, who resent being in coalition with the LIb-Dems.

    How much further do they want to go?. And this should be a warning to Labour not to be anxious to go further right. My suspicion has always been that the Conservatives went more right-wing because Blair dragged us in that direction.

    * Eddie Thompson (1925-1986)

    0

  • aracataca

    This has to be music to our ears as it may well signal the start of the disintegration of the government and is all the more reason for us to stay united and together. 

  • aracataca

    What we really need is a confidence vote that Cameron wins narrowly.  (Both the Fibs and  Cameron will want to hang on for as long as they can probably until 2015). He then becomes a lame duck Prime Minister. It is this kind of scenario which did for Major. 

  • trotters1957

    These “bastards” as Major called them were one of the reasons why New Labour won 3 elections and they still haven’t learned.
    They’re very reminiscent of Labour in the 80’s, then it was “we aren’t left wing enough”, with these it’s “we aren’t right wing enough”.

    They don’t understand that a party is a coaltion of a wide spectrum of views, that’s how you win elections, by representing a wide space.
    Labour has generally been good at this and need to remain a party which can have James Purnell and Ken Livingstone in it, as long as policy isn’t too one sided.

    So far Miliband has done really well in keeping everyone moderately happy and hasn’t been given enough credit for this. It would have been easy for Labour to pull itself apart.

    • AlanGiles

      I don’t have any problem with Purnell  being in the Labour party, if it amuses him, but I don’t want him back at Westminster.

      I certainly agree with your final paragraph though.

      * Gordon Beck (1933-2011)

      • ThePurpleBooker

        James Purnell will return to Westminster and he is more Labour than you will ever be. :)

        • Eric Pickles

          Fat chance!

          • treborc1

             hahaha talking to your self now

        • AlanGiles

          I was a member of the Labour Party eight years before Purnell was even thought of, and voting in the 1964 election for Harold Wilson, who you and Purnell may have heard of.

          I notice  if you click on the avatar “Ex Lib Dem” comes up again – I have no idea what silly prank you are up to, but it is puerile to keep a joke going for so long.

          * Tony Coe (1933 –     )

    • aracataca

      Quite right. Actually EM isn’t given enough credit full stop. In the 80s the party split in 2 allowing the Tories to win time after time. This time around we have remained very united. Division is confined to the criticism of individuals, eg AG criticising Purnell,  while the chances of the party becoming  Balkanised seem inconceivable from here.

  • Old Timer

    David Davis probably means “… change his tack…” but there you go. Obviously he’s not a sailor. The real question is if the Tories assassinate their current leader (who failed to win them a majority) would they simply replace him with a new leader (championing a different and much more Conservative agenda) and try to carry on? Or would the Coalition collapse under its own weight and another general election be triggered? Are the Tories really that self-destructive? Surely not.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Mike-Homfray/510980099 Mike Homfray

    I think its fair to say that those who are making noises now were less than enthused about the coalition in the first place

  • MattWales

    David Davies is as mad as a march hare.

    Here’s to many more outbursts from the swivel eyed loons between now and the next election.

    • trotters1957

      It’s good he’s got the same name as the rather saner David Davies the ex minister.

      He should consider changing his name.

      • treborc1

         You must have seen this before, it kept the Tories out of power for thirteen years, as they argued over who would be leader, can Thatcher make a come back and the Thatcherism legacy.

  • Brumanuensis

    I’m with Alan. He’s just a male Nadine Dorries. Nothing to see here.

    Although there is one amusing story about David Davies that bears repeating: http://www.guardian.co.uk/politics/2008/oct/29/police-daviddavis

    • robertcp

      That is funny!

  • http://twitter.com/bencobley Ben Cobley

     The other one is David Davis.

    • trotters1957

      OK clever clogs.

  • Amber Star

    From Tim Montgomerie – Conservative Home

    I invite that MP to read the leader in today’s FT. I count at least ten criticisms [of David Camron]…

    Too much compromise, not enough leadership: “Mr Cameron lacks the undisputed authority of his predecessors. But even so, he has exhibited a worrying lack of grip that leads him to split differences rather than set clear direction and priorities.”
    Inadequate direction from Number 10: “Mr Cameron, the self-styled chairman of the board, has allowed ministers too long a rein. He should not, for instance, have allowed his health secretary, Andrew Lansley, to press ahead with a flawed and unnecessary NHS reform bill. Other ministers have been cut too much slack.”
    Questions of probity: “When the coalition was formed, the prime minister preached that his administration would be “whiter than white”. This is hard to square with his decision to leave his culture secretary, Jeremy Hunt, in his post in spite of apparent breaches of the ministerial code, for which Mr Hunt has yet to give a satisfactory explanation.”
    Narrowness of the leadership and poor party management: “Mr Cameron’s party-management skills also need sharpening. He has rightly taken heat from his backbenches for running an aloof and exclusive administration.”
    Too much power in George Osborne’s hands: “An administration that saddles the chancellor of the exchequer, George Osborne, with responsibility not only for the economy but also for the government’s political strategy and keeping Scotland in the union, is one that is too narrowly based.”
    Poor record of appointments: “It cannot be denied that some of Mr Cameron’s personnel choices have turned out to be flawed. He should not have brought Andy Coulson, the former editor of the News of the World, into Number 10. His decision to make Peter Cruddas the Tory treasurer backfired within days.”
    Too much headline chasing: “The government as a whole is suffering from a growing perception of incompetence. Too many initiatives are launched, and too few delivered.”
    Inexperienced advisers and failure to reform civil service: “A few more grey hairs among the special advisers would do no harm. But above all, Mr Cameron desperately needs a proper political operation in Downing Street, with clear lines of command and control… Problems with delivery stem partly from the failure to reform the civil service, where officials should be charged with making sure policy is translated into action.”
    Some ministers are clearly failing: “After two years it is clear some of his ministers are not up to their responsibilities. While this newspaper shares the prime minister’s unease about excessive reshuffles, the time for a reorganisation has come.”
    Cameron too hands off: “The coalition must rediscover its ambition and the prime minister must assert his leadership. He is not a chairman. He is the chief executive officer. His government would run better if that was beyond doubt.”

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