Verdict: At PMQs, substance alone never beats style

21st November, 2012 1:04 pm

David Cameron won this subdued PMQs. Of that there is no doubt. That’s not because this was an outstanding performance from the PM (it wasn’t) or a particularly poor performance from Miliband (it wasn’t), but because, purely and simply, at PMQs, style will always beat substance.

Always. Always. Always.

And that’s something I’m not convinced Ed Miliband and his team have ever completely taken on board. His substance has always been perfectly good (well researched, rigorous), but it has only been in the last 7/8 months when the style caught up with the substance – more calm, confident, sometimes almost brash – that he was widely considered to be “winning” at PMQs. A looser, more relaxed and less forced Ed Milibnd was consistently getting the better of the PM each Wednesday. Yet today some of tw old habits crept back in. A shoehorned joke here, a needless repetition there.

Where had the style gone? This substance couldn’t win on its own…

Of course, some of you will lament such an interpretation of the PMQs bearpit. Politics should be about high principles, string arguments and a comprehensive marshalling of facts, you will argue. In an ideal world that would be true. If you ever find that ideal world, call me – I’d love to see it.

But PMQs has never been about any of that worthy but necessary stuff. PMQs is about confidence, élan, wit and insouciance. (And other words that sound better in French.)

And today, with a couple of well turned phrases and an appropriately timed sneer, Cameron won the day. No matter that his answers weren’t answers, or that the NHS is a mess. Style beat substance. Convincingly. With a zinger to finish. No comebacks.

In fairness to Miliband, part of his difficulty today was that he seems to find it tough to “change gear” at PMQs. Three somber statesmanlike questions on the Middle East followed by three barbed attacks on the government is a tough volte face for anyone of a moderate disposition to complete convincingly. Yet the PM has no such difficulty, switching effortlessly from agreeing with the honourable gentleman to tearing him to pieces with a pre conceived assault. Whether part of his personality or an acquired skill, it’s a powerful weapon for a political chameleon to have in his armoury.

In contrast, Miliband finds it hard to change gear like that. It may make him a well adjusted human being, but it makes winning set piece jousting sessions like today much harder.

That’s something that Ed needs to come to terms with and learn from. Because at PMQs substance alone never beats a style.

Never. Never. Never.

And after getting used to seeing Miliband trounce Cameron with regularity, I’d like to see that again. With style.

  • charliebeckett

    So if style always beats substance why does PMQ get so much attention? It gets a lot more than it used to, btw.

  • http://twitter.com/Ceilidhann Kayleigh Anne

    I get that PMQs exists to rally confidence in the Commons troops, so to speak, and I still don’t know a single non politics geek person who actually watches it, but there’s something so incredibly depressing in jokes getting more attention than policy.

    In lighter news, Cameron’s hair’s getting more interesting as time passes.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Mike-Homfray/510980099 Mike Homfray

    That says what is wrong with PMQ and politics more broadly. It needs changing. I don’t think that Ed will ever beat a PR man like Cameron on ‘style’, but I also think people are a bit sick of snake oil salesmen running politics

Latest

  • News Video “You can’t empower local government if you impoverish it” – Harriet Harman’s response to the Queen’s Speech

    “You can’t empower local government if you impoverish it” – Harriet Harman’s response to the Queen’s Speech

    Harriet Harman, who is the interim Labour leader, today gave her party’s response to the Government’s Queen’s Speech. In it, she directed a number of jibes to the Tories, saying to David Cameron “we are both, by our own admission, interim leaders” in reference to his announcement prior to the election that he wouldn’t serve the full five years as leader. She made it clear that Labour were intent on holding the Government to account and she argued that changes […]

    Read more →
  • News Scotland Ken Macintosh asks for changes to be made to Scottish Leadership contest rules

    Ken Macintosh asks for changes to be made to Scottish Leadership contest rules

    Ken Macintosh MSP, who is considering standing to be the next leader of the Scottish Labour Party, has written to the outgoing leader Jim Murphy, the Chair of the Scottish Executive Committee and to the General Secretary of the Scottish Labour Party to ask for changes to be made to the way a new party leader is elected. In an open letter, Macintosh he asks that Scottish Labour Party elect its new leader by using One Member One Vote system and […]

    Read more →
  • Comment Understanding the election result: we mustn’t overdramatise the facts or oversimplify the answers

    Understanding the election result: we mustn’t overdramatise the facts or oversimplify the answers

    “Labour’s era may now be over and perhaps it is time for something new”, wrote one commentator in last Sunday’s Observer.  Keen to gain a hearing for their views, academics and journalists have joined some of my Labour colleagues in talking up the implications of our defeat on 7 May, just as they did in 1992. Then, as now, we were told that Labour could never form a majority government again. Just five years later we secured our biggest victory […]

    Read more →
  • Featured News Why is attacking trade unions one of the Government’s top priorities?

    Why is attacking trade unions one of the Government’s top priorities?

    The Queen’s Speech sets the government’s agenda for the coming parliament. And today’s gave a clear sign as to what this Tory government – the first in 18 years – considers a priority: taking away workers’ right to legally go on strike. In one speech, the Government – using the Queen as their mouthpiece – went from saying they wanted to help working people to outlining how they would effectively ban the right to strike. In their Trade Unions Bills, […]

    Read more →
  • News Video Silence… No Dennis Skinner heckle for Black Rod at this year’s Queen’s Speech

    Silence… No Dennis Skinner heckle for Black Rod at this year’s Queen’s Speech

    It is almost as much a tradition of the State Opening of Parliament as the rest of the regal pageantry, and once a year the political world awaits with baited breath what Bolsover MP Dennis Skinner will say when the Black Rod enters the House of Commons chamber. Except this year there was nothing. NO DENNIS SKINNER QUIP! #worstconstitutionalcrisissincetheabdication — Owen Bennett (@owenjbennett) May 27, 2015 Despite managing to keep his usual front row seat in the ongoing battle with […]

    Read more →
Share with your friends










Submit