We are a nation of immigrants. Aren’t we?

December 18, 2012 3:45 pm

I recall as a twelve year old growing up in the ‘Motor City’ that was Coventry and interpreting for my English school teacher who had started arranging English classes at the local Sikh Temple (Gurdawara). Twice a week in the evenings he volunteered (with me) to teach basic English as a second language to members of the local, relatively newly arrived congregation. This was at a time when no provisions had been made by employers, National or Local Government to teach English and hence improve engagement and dialogue between new arrivals and hosts. Many argued that the British State and employers only wanted the cheap labour of immigrants and did not address the issues arising out of settlement.

My father picked up rudimentary English from his colleagues on building sites where he worked as a carpenter and my mother learnt enough English to get on a bus, buy some groceries and say ‘hello and thank you’. How they would have loved an opportunity to learn the English language and therefore engage with employers who exploited them, have meaningful conversations with my teachers at parents teachers evenings and challenge the racists who abused them (P*** bashing was at it’s virulent worst – it was time when it was fashionable for white gangs to seek out and attack people of colour).

Forty year on, Ed Miliband has suggested that the ability to speak English improves engagement, interaction and therefore integration – seems logical to me. However, the dangerous inference is that immigrants choose to or not learn English, though many who arrived in the 60’s and 70’s from the ex-colonies included people from the Caribbean for whom English was their first language and were Christian like the host nation.

The issue of fluency in the English language is no longer on the same scale as it was for the pioneering immigrants of the 60’s and 70’s, most have now passed away or retired to the Indian Subcontinent. Today we have the fourth or fifth generation of children of immigrants from the Indian Sub continent and East Africa. For this generation not only do they speak English fluently but think and dream in English.

Proficiency in English is now relevant for immigrants from Eastern Europe. Again, history repeats itself as Coalition Government behaviour has led to the chronic underfunding of English-language teaching.

With the onslaught of Government policy on privatisation of public services, there are some private contractors who wilfully exploit workers’ lack of English skills, from migrants working in the agricultural sector packing food for supermarkets in East Anglia to cleaners in Westminster or GMB members cleaning and providing catering at Swindon General Hospital.

English language provision in isolation is not enough. Any debate or policy on immigration has to be holistic that addresses issues around housing, health care, education provision and fundamentally strengthening workplace rights with stronger sanctions against employers who wilfully abuse, exploit and in many cases degrade migrants. Yet the Coalition Government is hurtling in the opposite direction with proposals to reduce employment rights, reduce English language provision and it is not surprising that some new migrants are marginalised and a long way away from integrating into the mainstream of Britain.

The influx of migrants has seen a growth in xenophobic attitudes towards people coming into the UK to find work, particularly from Eastern Europe. In areas of Britain with higher rates of unemployment there has been growing resentment.

The last 70 or 80 years we have experienced migration from Europe and the rest of the world. For example Jewish people finding sanctuary from the Nazis, Irish people responsible for building our great railways and canals as well as people from the Commonwealth staffing our hospitals and transport systems. We forget at our peril that we are a nation of immigrants. Or should it be ‘One Nation’ of immigrants?

  • Amber_Star

    People should be required to learn English before they come to the UK, if they are coming here seeking work. Politically, we cannot add English lessons to the list of special support which new migrants will be perceived as receiving at the expense of people who are already residents/ citizens of the UK.
    Public funds need to be spend on helping people who are already here. Unemployment & lack of opportunity blights the lives of too many young & female ethnic minority citizens.

  • Amber_Star

    People should be required to learn English before they come to the UK, if they are coming here seeking work. Politically, we cannot add English lessons to the list of special support which new migrants will be perceived as receiving at the expense of people who are already residents/ citizens of the UK.
    Public funds need to be spend on helping people who are already here. Unemployment & lack of opportunity blights the lives of too many young & female ethnic minority citizens.

    • evad666

      Unemployment & lack of opportunity blights the lives of too many young & female (white and) ethnic minority citizens.

  • Amber_Star

    People should be required to learn English before they come to the UK, if they are coming here seeking work. Politically, we cannot add English lessons to the list of special support which new migrants will be perceived as receiving at the expense of people who are already residents/ citizens of the UK.
    Public funds need to be spend on helping people who are already here. Unemployment & lack of opportunity blights the lives of too many young & female ethnic minority citizens.

  • NT86

    Alongside the requirement to learn English, which needs to be supported by proper public funding, I’m afraid that UKIP’s idea for a responsible and controlled immigration policy is more important than ever. This is a tiny island that has only limited capacity and resources to sustain a population.

  • NT86

    Alongside the requirement to learn English, which needs to be supported by proper public funding, I’m afraid that UKIP’s idea for a responsible and controlled immigration policy is more important than ever. This is a tiny island that has only limited capacity and resources to sustain a population.

  • NT86

    Alongside the requirement to learn English, which needs to be supported by proper public funding, I’m afraid that UKIP’s idea for a responsible and controlled immigration policy is more important than ever. This is a tiny island that has only limited capacity and resources to sustain a population.

  • JoeDM

    The real issue is one of integration.

    The various groups of immigrants down the ages have integrated into our society, becoming part and parcel of British social culture. Where multiculturalism has failed is that it has given some immigrant communities the idea that they do not have to integrate, that they can have their own ghettos with their own separate development.

    Integration into the normal British way of life is the key. Allowing separate development is the path to a future disaster.

    After all the fuss about Polish immigration, where is the problem? I live in an East Anglian town with a big Polish community, but as far as I can see they have learned English, work very hard, contribute to our local clubs, pubs and societies etc. Our local jazz club jam nights has benefited from a couple of very good sax players who drive taxis during the day. This is the way it should be. Not failed multiculturalism.

  • JoeDM

    The real issue is one of integration.

    The various groups of immigrants down the ages have integrated into our society, becoming part and parcel of British social culture. Where multiculturalism has failed is that it has given some immigrant communities the idea that they do not have to integrate, that they can have their own ghettos with their own separate development.

    Integration into the normal British way of life is the key. Allowing separate development is the path to a future disaster.

    After all the fuss about Polish immigration, where is the problem? I live in an East Anglian town with a big Polish community, but as far as I can see they have learned English, work very hard, contribute to our local clubs, pubs and societies etc. Our local jazz club jam nights has benefited from a couple of very good sax players who drive taxis during the day. This is the way it should be. Not failed multiculturalism.

  • JoeDM

    The real issue is one of integration.

    The various groups of immigrants down the ages have integrated into our society, becoming part and parcel of British social culture. Where multiculturalism has failed is that it has given some immigrant communities the idea that they do not have to integrate, that they can have their own ghettos with their own separate development.

    Integration into the normal British way of life is the key. Allowing separate development is the path to a future disaster.

    After all the fuss about Polish immigration, where is the problem? I live in an East Anglian town with a big Polish community, but as far as I can see they have learned English, work very hard, contribute to our local clubs, pubs and societies etc. Our local jazz club jam nights has benefited from a couple of very good sax players who drive taxis during the day. This is the way it should be. Not failed multiculturalism.

  • MrSauce

    Yes we are.
    Was it Churchill who described Britain as a ‘mongrel nation’?
    Long may it continue.

Latest

  • News Miliband speaks out on anti-semitic abuse targeted at Luciana Berger – and calls on social media companies to act

    Miliband speaks out on anti-semitic abuse targeted at Luciana Berger – and calls on social media companies to act

    As we reported last week, Labour MP and Shadow Minister Luciana Berger has been the victim of a sustained torrent of disgusting online anti-semtic abuse. Ed Miliband has hit out at Berger’s abusers today, calling on social media companies to be more proactive in tackling sustained, orchestrated abuse. He told Jewish News: “The anti-Semitic abuse that Luciana Berger has experienced over recent days is utterly appalling and has absolutely no place in our country. We must have no tolerance for this vile […]

    Read more →
  • Comment The debate about building ‘the homes we need’ has to go beyond numbers

    The debate about building ‘the homes we need’ has to go beyond numbers

    Big numbers abound in housing debates and rightly so. Two-hundred thousand new homes – the number the Labour frontbench has committed to building annually – is a response to the housing crisis that is starting to approach the scale we need. But the debate about building ‘the homes we need’ has to go beyond numbers. To make the point, look at the extreme case of ‘buy-to-leave’ homes that are bought off-plan as investors’ latest fancy and sit there empty in […]

    Read more →
  • Comment The mansion tax is a progressive tax and Labour in London should support it

    The mansion tax is a progressive tax and Labour in London should support it

    For those of us who believe in progressive taxation the last few weeks in London Labour have been pretty dismal. We seem to have an array of Labour MPs (mainly wannabe London mayoral candidates) and council leaders rushing to the press denouncing the proposed mansion tax as a’ tax on London’ (or if they were more honest a tax on the rich parts of London). Yes the promotion of the Mansion Tax has been inept and it would more accurate […]

    Read more →
  • Comment It’s time to put the Green Belt back on the table

    It’s time to put the Green Belt back on the table

    The UK’s housing crisis has finally been recognised across the political spectrum as an issue that needs urgent attention. Yet despite this consensus, political inertia on housebuilding has seen subsequent governments fail to create policies that address the issue coherently and strategically. Labour’s recent Lyons Review demonstrates a commitment to house-building, with a target of constructing 200,000 homes a year. Yet while the Review recognises that the housing crisis is not evenly spread, requiring different solutions in different places, there is […]

    Read more →
  • News Scotland ASLEF backs Neil Findlay for Scottish Labour leader

    ASLEF backs Neil Findlay for Scottish Labour leader

    Neil Findlay has become the first Scottish Labour leadership candidate to pick up Trade Union support. Rail union ASLEF have backed the MSP this afternoon, becoming the first union to formally endorse a candidate (although it looks like Unite will back Findlay too). Their General Secretary Mick Whelan released the following statement: “We are supporting Neil Findlay in his bid to become leader of the Scottish Labour Party and, we hope, First Minister in 2016, because he has the character, […]

    Read more →