Labour to force vote on “mummy tax” today

21st January, 2013 11:10 am

Labour will today table an amendment to the welfare up-rating bill to force a vote on the government’s real terms cut to maternity pay – which as been labelled the “mummy tax”. The move comes as party sources reveal that 150,000 women are expected to be hit by the £180 real terms cut in the 106 battleground seats Labour identified this month.

A Labour source told us:

“There are set to be 150,000 working mums in key seats who will lose out under these plans by 2015 thanks to the part-time Chancellor’s political games. On Monday we will seek to force a vote on the mummy tax so every Tory MP in a battleground seat has to back Labour’s amendment or vote to cut support for striving mums – and if they don’t do the right thing, we’ll make sure their constituents know about it.”

  • http://twitter.com/johnringer John Ringer

    I sort of recoil at the emphasis on the working mums in “key seats”. As if the plight of a working mum in Bolsover or Tunbridge Wells is worth less to us than that of one in Basildon. I mean, I know what they’re trying to say, but I thought we were trying to be “one nation”!

    • John Ruddy

      If there is 150,000 working Mums in the 106 key seats, surely that means there is over 750,000 in the other 550 odd seats?
      Thats a lot of people to piss off…

  • jaime taurosangastre candelas

    Can anyone explain how this figure of £180 is generated? As the reduction in increase in SMP is 1.2% (from the expected 2.2% down to a 1% increase), and payable over 33 weeks, the £180 “cut” would imply that SMP is normally paid at a rate of £454 weekly. But it is not: it is £135.45 weekly. The reality would appear to be (135.45 x 1.022) – (135.45 x 1.010) = £1.63 weekly, x 33 weeks = £53.64.

    Even looking at the 3 year period of the abatement from 2.2% to 1%, it would imply that for the £180 figure to be true, Labour are expecting on average each woman affected to be pregnant 3.35 times in 3 tax years, or a total of about 128 weeks. That is an awful lot of (lower case) labour, and the women should be getting a medal in addition to the SMP.

  • http://twitter.com/robertsjonathan Jonathan Roberts

    Agree with John below. And aside from the labeling of it as a tax – which it is not –
    does anyone know if we tried to stop the cut to paternity benefits? I
    have been concerned for many years that everything to do with family is
    labeled a women’s issue, and the ‘dad’ part of the family gets ignored.
    In fact, the only time dads are ever referred to is in the context of
    absentee dads – the countless good ones seem to get ignored in politics.

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