Labour to force vote on “mummy tax” today

21st January, 2013 11:10 am

Labour will today table an amendment to the welfare up-rating bill to force a vote on the government’s real terms cut to maternity pay – which as been labelled the “mummy tax”. The move comes as party sources reveal that 150,000 women are expected to be hit by the £180 real terms cut in the 106 battleground seats Labour identified this month.

A Labour source told us:

“There are set to be 150,000 working mums in key seats who will lose out under these plans by 2015 thanks to the part-time Chancellor’s political games. On Monday we will seek to force a vote on the mummy tax so every Tory MP in a battleground seat has to back Labour’s amendment or vote to cut support for striving mums – and if they don’t do the right thing, we’ll make sure their constituents know about it.”

  • http://twitter.com/johnringer John Ringer

    I sort of recoil at the emphasis on the working mums in “key seats”. As if the plight of a working mum in Bolsover or Tunbridge Wells is worth less to us than that of one in Basildon. I mean, I know what they’re trying to say, but I thought we were trying to be “one nation”!

    • John Ruddy

      If there is 150,000 working Mums in the 106 key seats, surely that means there is over 750,000 in the other 550 odd seats?
      Thats a lot of people to piss off…

  • jaime taurosangastre candelas

    Can anyone explain how this figure of £180 is generated? As the reduction in increase in SMP is 1.2% (from the expected 2.2% down to a 1% increase), and payable over 33 weeks, the £180 “cut” would imply that SMP is normally paid at a rate of £454 weekly. But it is not: it is £135.45 weekly. The reality would appear to be (135.45 x 1.022) – (135.45 x 1.010) = £1.63 weekly, x 33 weeks = £53.64.

    Even looking at the 3 year period of the abatement from 2.2% to 1%, it would imply that for the £180 figure to be true, Labour are expecting on average each woman affected to be pregnant 3.35 times in 3 tax years, or a total of about 128 weeks. That is an awful lot of (lower case) labour, and the women should be getting a medal in addition to the SMP.

  • http://twitter.com/robertsjonathan Jonathan Roberts

    Agree with John below. And aside from the labeling of it as a tax – which it is not –
    does anyone know if we tried to stop the cut to paternity benefits? I
    have been concerned for many years that everything to do with family is
    labeled a women’s issue, and the ‘dad’ part of the family gets ignored.
    In fact, the only time dads are ever referred to is in the context of
    absentee dads – the countless good ones seem to get ignored in politics.

Latest

  • Featured News Miliband announces plans for emergency nursing recruitment drive as part of “NHS Rescue Plan”

    Miliband announces plans for emergency nursing recruitment drive as part of “NHS Rescue Plan”

    Ed Miliband is set to announce Labour’s “NHS Rescue Plan” – starting with an emergency recruitment drive designed to get another 1,000 nurses into training this year. Speaking to student nurses at Manchester Metropolitan University, the Labour leader will say that this 1,000 nurses is the first installment of the 20,000 nurses (and 8.000 doctors) the party would fund thanks to its “time to care” fund. Labour would – on the first day of a Miliband government – ask universities to […]

    Read more →
  • Comment Featured 5 things we learned from Miliband’s Evan Davis interview

    5 things we learned from Miliband’s Evan Davis interview

    Ed Miliband was the third leader to face an Evan Davis grilling tonight. Davis isn’t not as pugnacious as Jeremy Paxman, nor as dogged as Andrew Neill (who I’d like to see interview all of the party leaders), but he’s smart, well prepared and hammers home at points of potential weakness. He’s an incredibly tough interviewer – you’d have to be to do the Today Programme and Newsnight – and that was certainly the case for Miliband tonight, at least in the […]

    Read more →
  • Comment Scotland The SNP manifesto is a dangerous throwback to the 80s

    The SNP manifesto is a dangerous throwback to the 80s

    This isn’t the article I expected to write about the SNP manifesto. I was ready to praise Nicola Sturgeon’s political guile for producing a carbon copy of Labour’s programme. After a full week to digest Labour’s offer, I fully expected an identikit policy programme, presented as a ‘hand of friendship’ from the SNP: part of the party’s lethal campaign to minimise the differences between itself and Labour; to prove to Scots that there is nothing to fear from switching to […]

    Read more →
  • Comment The Shrewsbury 24 deserve to know what really went on in 1972

    The Shrewsbury 24 deserve to know what really went on in 1972

    In 1972, after an industrial dispute in the Shropshire town of Shrewsbury, 24 men were prosecuted under the ancient 1875 Conspiracy Act. Ever since then, the 24, their family and friends protest their innocence and have tirelessly fought their convictions. It’s become a cause célèbre for the trade union movement. There have long been suspicions of murky political interference in the trial. Many have accused the then Tory Government of orchestrating a show trial.  Yet, time and again, demands for the truth have […]

    Read more →
  • News Weekly Survey: Coalition, campaign and leadership

    Weekly Survey: Coalition, campaign and leadership

      We are now over halfway through the short campaign, and very little movement has been spotted in the polls. We’ve had manifestos, pledges and difficult interviews – but how would you rate Labour’s campaign so far? On current polling, it would seem a hung parliament is the likeliest outcome. If Labour have chance to form a government, and had a choice, what would be your preferred type of government? Finally, Ed Miliband’s personal ratings appear to be on the […]

    Read more →
Share with your friends










Submit