Morning Report: Cameron sets about proving Steve Hilton right

January 14, 2013 9:34 am

morning_report.png

Yesterday Steve Hilton’s Stanford lecture revealed the omnishambolic nature of the Downing Street operation. This morning, David Cameron was on the Today Programme and Daybreak doing his to prove his barefoot guru right.

Seemingly Downing Street sent the PM out to do the morning media rounds to talk about pensions. However Cameron’s crack squad of advisers evidently forgot that Cameron hasn’t made his much trailed Europe speech yet – so obviously that was all Cameron was asked about. So Cameron ended up on the Today Programme getting monstered over a speech that he hasn’t given yet and that he can’t talk about. Another failure of the government’s media grid, one suspects.

Cameron did however commit to leaders debates in 2015 though – although he’s rather cagey about having them dominate the weeks before the election. I can’t for the life of me understand why…

Elsewhere this morning, Michael Gove is pushing ahead with plans for performance-related pay in schools, as his war on teachers continues, and the Mirror have reported approvingly on Ed Miliband’s plans for a crackdown on company tax avoidance. Meanwhile most of the papers have reported Ed Miliband’s comments on Ed Balls remaining as Shadow Chancellor – but as I noted earlier this morning, that’s unsurprising and sensible.

Bit of a quiet start to the week – don’t expect it to stay that way…

  • http://www.facebook.com/jim.crowder2 Jim Crowder

    Almost too partisan to comment, but it’s worth a shot.

    Are you suggesting that this was different under Labour? Or that the Tories are so much more competent than Labour that you would have expected it to be different now?

    I wasn’t at the lecture (I live in Devon and transport is not as good here as in London), but read the article in The Sunday Times. It certainly did not suggest any government incompetence by either party. It did suggest that the EU and Civil Service control more policy that a government does. Some will believe this to be wrong, others see it as a way of limiting the political power of an elected government they disagree with.

    I hope the answer is not to have political appointments in the Civil Service.

  • Brumanuensis

    “the Mirror have reported approvingly on Ed Miliband’s plans for a crackdown on company tax avoidance”

    That’s not exactly a surprise is it?

  • http://twitter.com/lavarae Rachel Walker

    Is Labour happy about the leaders debates if it ends up being two members of the coalition against one shadow? The Greens have a member of parliment, so should be invited. And while I’m no fan, UKIP would appear to have much right to appear as LibDems based on polling.

Latest

  • Comment As the PPC in Iain Duncan Smith’s constituency, Ed has taught me two important lessons

    As the PPC in Iain Duncan Smith’s constituency, Ed has taught me two important lessons

    Ed Miliband has tackled the issue of his perceived image problem. Rather than embarrassingly excuse himself or convince the public he is something he is not, he has embraced his own persona, accepting it in order to extinguish the ongoing media analysis of who he is rather than what he stands for. This move shows courage, political prowess and most of all, it’s set the stage for next year’s election to be about policy rather than personalities. I cannot tell […]

    Read more →
  • Featured Cameron condemned for immigration PR stunt

    Cameron condemned for immigration PR stunt

    Yesterday, David Cameron offered an ominous threat to people who are deemed to be ‘illegal immigrants’, when he said “we will find you and make sure you are sent back to the country you came from.”  Who knew he meant this literally?  This announcement was worrying enough in itself – such a threat demonises immigrants and ignores the many reasons people might be in the UK illegally – but the PM decided to take his intimidating statement one step further. Cameron, […]

    Read more →
  • Comment Cameron dropped Gove, now Labour must drop his policies

    Cameron dropped Gove, now Labour must drop his policies

    Fireworks, champagne corks popping and rare mashups of Hallelujah and Ode to Joy were heard echoing down the corridors from staffrooms across England and Wales in response to the news that Michael Gove had at long last been sacked as Secretary of State for Education. Forget the unpopularity of his policies, his mishandling of the scandal over suspected attempts to indoctrinate Birmingham’s children to Islamic extremism or his inability to work with anyone from teachers to the Home Secretary – […]

    Read more →
  • News Labour outraised the Tories in 2013, but financial worries still remain

    Labour outraised the Tories in 2013, but financial worries still remain

    The Electoral Commission’s annual report of party finances has been published for 2013, and it turns out that Labour actually raised more money than the Conservatives last year – by almost £8 million. Labour raised £33.4m, while the Tories raised just £25.4m. As George Eaton points out, over at the New Statesman, much of Labour’s advantage comes from short money (the money opposition parties receive from the state). However, this only amounts to £6.9m, meaning Labour still raised roughly an […]

    Read more →
  • Comment We need a Mayor who offers London serious alternatives

    We need a Mayor who offers London serious alternatives

     Speaking at the launch of Labour’s summer campaign last week Ed Miliband said “We need a new leadership: Leadership that thinks deeply and offers creative, new ideas. Leadership that seeks to be faithful to principle, even when it’s hard to do. Leadership that listens and cares.” His eyes, of course, are set on the general election but he could have been talking about the London mayoral campaign. This time next year a very short primary season will be in full […]

    Read more →