Morning Report: Cameron sets about proving Steve Hilton right

January 14, 2013 9:34 am

morning_report.png

Yesterday Steve Hilton’s Stanford lecture revealed the omnishambolic nature of the Downing Street operation. This morning, David Cameron was on the Today Programme and Daybreak doing his to prove his barefoot guru right.

Seemingly Downing Street sent the PM out to do the morning media rounds to talk about pensions. However Cameron’s crack squad of advisers evidently forgot that Cameron hasn’t made his much trailed Europe speech yet – so obviously that was all Cameron was asked about. So Cameron ended up on the Today Programme getting monstered over a speech that he hasn’t given yet and that he can’t talk about. Another failure of the government’s media grid, one suspects.

Cameron did however commit to leaders debates in 2015 though – although he’s rather cagey about having them dominate the weeks before the election. I can’t for the life of me understand why…

Elsewhere this morning, Michael Gove is pushing ahead with plans for performance-related pay in schools, as his war on teachers continues, and the Mirror have reported approvingly on Ed Miliband’s plans for a crackdown on company tax avoidance. Meanwhile most of the papers have reported Ed Miliband’s comments on Ed Balls remaining as Shadow Chancellor – but as I noted earlier this morning, that’s unsurprising and sensible.

Bit of a quiet start to the week – don’t expect it to stay that way…

  • http://www.facebook.com/jim.crowder2 Jim Crowder

    Almost too partisan to comment, but it’s worth a shot.

    Are you suggesting that this was different under Labour? Or that the Tories are so much more competent than Labour that you would have expected it to be different now?

    I wasn’t at the lecture (I live in Devon and transport is not as good here as in London), but read the article in The Sunday Times. It certainly did not suggest any government incompetence by either party. It did suggest that the EU and Civil Service control more policy that a government does. Some will believe this to be wrong, others see it as a way of limiting the political power of an elected government they disagree with.

    I hope the answer is not to have political appointments in the Civil Service.

  • Brumanuensis

    “the Mirror have reported approvingly on Ed Miliband’s plans for a crackdown on company tax avoidance”

    That’s not exactly a surprise is it?

  • http://twitter.com/lavarae Rachel Walker

    Is Labour happy about the leaders debates if it ends up being two members of the coalition against one shadow? The Greens have a member of parliment, so should be invited. And while I’m no fan, UKIP would appear to have much right to appear as LibDems based on polling.

Latest

  • News Woolf and May should “meet survivors groups” over Brittan links, say Labour

    Woolf and May should “meet survivors groups” over Brittan links, say Labour

    Labour have spoken out about complaints that Fiona Woolf QC, head of the public inquiry into historical sex abuse, has links with Leon Brittan. Brittan was the home secretary at the time when the dossier about alleged pedophiles went missing. And Woolf, who is also Lord Mayor of London, admitted yesterday that since 2008 she had dinner with Brittan and his family on five separate occasions but she has said she has “no close association” with him. A number of Labour MPs […]

    Read more →
  • Comment PMQs review: Miliband lands punch on NHS as leaders go through the motions

    PMQs review: Miliband lands punch on NHS as leaders go through the motions

    Here we are again. Another week, another Wednesday, and another wrangle between Cameron and Miliband about the NHS. This is getting a bit old. Cameron attempted to get Miliband on the back foot – he kicked off PMQs by posing questions to the Labour leader about the Welsh NHS. Rather predictably, the rest of PMQs descended into the two party leaders arguing about who can be more trusted with the NHS. But, there was something a little more sinister about […]

    Read more →
  • Comment There is no such thing as a safe seat any more

    There is no such thing as a safe seat any more

    A couple of weeks ago saw the UK elect for the first time a UKIP MP – Douglas Carswell, with a huge majority of 12,000 votes. UKIP made enormous strides in the safe Labour seat of Heywood & Middleton as well, reducing the Labour majority from 5,971 to 617. This rise in the ‘acceptable’ far right should be a cause of concern not just to the Tories but also to us. It is clear from these results there is no […]

    Read more →
  • Comment We must tackle Ukip’s emotional appeal

    We must tackle Ukip’s emotional appeal

    The result in Heywood and Middleton may have shocked some people, but not all. Some warned this could happen after UKIP took or seriously challenged safe council seats in the north, topped the national vote at the Euros, and polled strongly in Labour areas. Their highest average share of the vote in the 2014 elections came in Labour areas like Rotherham, Mansfield and Hartlepool. We’re told if we campaign on the “issues” people will come back to Labour. This fails […]

    Read more →
  • Featured Young Labour voted against supporting the free education demo, but the debate on tuition fees has been reopened

    Young Labour voted against supporting the free education demo, but the debate on tuition fees has been reopened

    Last night Young Labour voted on whether or not to come out in support of the free education demonstration set to take place on the 19th November. Reports suggest, they voted against the motion. This result could easily be interpreted as another sign that the argument against tuition fees is dead in the water. In reality, it tells us that opposite is true. The very fact that this was a topic for discussion at Young Labour’s national committee, that there […]

    Read more →
7ads6x98y