Morning Report: Cameron sets about proving Steve Hilton right

January 14, 2013 9:34 am

morning_report.png

Yesterday Steve Hilton’s Stanford lecture revealed the omnishambolic nature of the Downing Street operation. This morning, David Cameron was on the Today Programme and Daybreak doing his to prove his barefoot guru right.

Seemingly Downing Street sent the PM out to do the morning media rounds to talk about pensions. However Cameron’s crack squad of advisers evidently forgot that Cameron hasn’t made his much trailed Europe speech yet – so obviously that was all Cameron was asked about. So Cameron ended up on the Today Programme getting monstered over a speech that he hasn’t given yet and that he can’t talk about. Another failure of the government’s media grid, one suspects.

Cameron did however commit to leaders debates in 2015 though – although he’s rather cagey about having them dominate the weeks before the election. I can’t for the life of me understand why…

Elsewhere this morning, Michael Gove is pushing ahead with plans for performance-related pay in schools, as his war on teachers continues, and the Mirror have reported approvingly on Ed Miliband’s plans for a crackdown on company tax avoidance. Meanwhile most of the papers have reported Ed Miliband’s comments on Ed Balls remaining as Shadow Chancellor – but as I noted earlier this morning, that’s unsurprising and sensible.

Bit of a quiet start to the week – don’t expect it to stay that way…

  • http://www.facebook.com/jim.crowder2 Jim Crowder

    Almost too partisan to comment, but it’s worth a shot.

    Are you suggesting that this was different under Labour? Or that the Tories are so much more competent than Labour that you would have expected it to be different now?

    I wasn’t at the lecture (I live in Devon and transport is not as good here as in London), but read the article in The Sunday Times. It certainly did not suggest any government incompetence by either party. It did suggest that the EU and Civil Service control more policy that a government does. Some will believe this to be wrong, others see it as a way of limiting the political power of an elected government they disagree with.

    I hope the answer is not to have political appointments in the Civil Service.

  • Brumanuensis

    “the Mirror have reported approvingly on Ed Miliband’s plans for a crackdown on company tax avoidance”

    That’s not exactly a surprise is it?

  • http://twitter.com/lavarae Rachel Walker

    Is Labour happy about the leaders debates if it ends up being two members of the coalition against one shadow? The Greens have a member of parliment, so should be invited. And while I’m no fan, UKIP would appear to have much right to appear as LibDems based on polling.

Latest

  • Comment Reaching new communities

    Reaching new communities

    This article is from Our Labour, Our Communities – a pamphlet of 10 essays by Labour PPCs, published by LabourList in partnership with Lisa Nandy MP. I am proud to be standing as the candidate for my hometown of Hastings & Rye, but I am equally proud to stand as a parliamentary candidate who is also half Chinese and half British. My mother is Chinese Malaysian and came to this country 41 years ago to be a nurse in Hastings and continues to […]

    Read more →
  • Comment Labour could lose out by not making it’s stance on Trident clear

    Labour could lose out by not making it’s stance on Trident clear

    Cutting Trident will be the price of support in a hung parliament. That’s the news reported from a meeting of the SNP, Plaid Cymru and Green leaders this week. With Labour’s slim lead and the SNP and Green vote threatening to impact on its share, this is a serious issue. Labour’s policy clearly states, ‘Labour has said that we are committed to a minimum, credible independent nuclear deterrent, delivered through a Continuous At-Sea Deterrent. It would require a clear body […]

    Read more →
  • Comment Featured Is Cameron “frit” of TV debates? Let’s try the empty chair threat

    Is Cameron “frit” of TV debates? Let’s try the empty chair threat

    Lord Ashcroft has told him he shouldn’t have done it in 2010. Lynton Crosby has told him not to do it in 2015. It’s no surprise that David Cameron is trying to wriggle out of televised leader debates during the General Election – even though he has said he is willing to take part “in principle”. Time perhaps to dust off one of Margaret Thatcher’s favourite barbs “He’s frit.” Neil Kinnock tried it in 1992 to try to goad John Major into […]

    Read more →
  • Comment Flexibility makes for good work, strong families and thriving communities

    Flexibility makes for good work, strong families and thriving communities

    By Stephen Timms MP and Ian Murray MP The Christmas period reminds us that modern life can be busy, hurried and demanding. The pressures of work, demands of family life and hectic Christmas schedules can prove stretching as we juggle competing demands. Increasingly the need for flexible work is driven by the complex shape of people’s lives; as parents go to work, struggle to make ends meet, perform career roles, take their children to school and activities and try and carve […]

    Read more →
  • News Labour MP questions campaigning roles of publicly funded advisers

    Labour MP questions campaigning roles of publicly funded advisers

    As the start of the long campaign begins today, curbing the amount of money parties can spend between now and May 7th, Labour MP Jon Ashworth has sought to clarify what precautions are being taken to ensure publicly-funded government advisers are not using their time campaigning. Ashworth has sent a letter to senior civil servant Jeremy Heywood, asking him to answer a number of questions about what kind of campaigning activity was permitted and undertaken by special advisers (SpAds) in […]

    Read more →