What the Coalition audit won’t tell you

January 9, 2013 4:06 pm

It’s already clear that the Coalition “audit” isn’t the list of 70 broken pledges that we’d all been led to expect (No.10 claims that would be too simplistic, which is one of the most spectacular pieces of spin we’ve heard in quite some time).

However even the text itself is missing quite a few things, including the one section that says, “We recognise that deficit reduction, and continuing to ensure economic recovery, is the most urgent issue facing Britain.”

Yet there’s no mention of growth figures – nevermind the double-dip recession.

Similarly in the section on deficit reduction there’s no mention of broken pledges to balance the books and get debt down by 2015 – let alone the fact that borrowing has risen over the past year.

Journalists will be trawling through the document this afternoon.

They shouldn’t bother – it’s a partial document from a government who are marking their own homework…

Update: Here’s a broken promise that the Tories haven’t even tried to cover up…

No top down reorganisation

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Graeme-Hancocks/1156294498 Graeme Hancocks

    What do we expect from this pair of idiots?

Latest

  • News Labour would instil co-operative principles in the rail industry, Creagh will explain

    Labour would instil co-operative principles in the rail industry, Creagh will explain

    Today, Mary Creagh Shadow Secretary of State for Transport will outline a new deal Scotland’s railways, if Scotland should votes ‘no’ in the referendum. Working together, Scottish and UK Labour are putting forward a proposal for a “new deal for rail”. This includes a review into the UK and Scottish Government’s franchising process and would mean that UK Parliament would legislate so that public sector companies can bid for rail franchises. The new plans would also see the Scottish Parliament have […]

    Read more →
  • Featured Miliband gets his retaliation in first

    Miliband gets his retaliation in first

    Of course Ed Miliband isn’t really like Wallace from Wallace and Gromit. If he was he’d have been eating a Wensleydale sandwich instead of a bacon one, and none of this fuss would ever have happened. OK, maybe not. The leader of the opposition, especially one who is seen as a threat by newspaper proprietors and other powerful interests, is bound to be scrutinised relentlessly and sometimes not very fairly. It happens – and the Labour leader knows it. Which is […]

    Read more →
  • News Cooper to explain how the government doesn’t take violence against women seriously

    Cooper to explain how the government doesn’t take violence against women seriously

    Today, shadow home secretary Yvette Cooper will give a speech outlining the crimes that have been hidden during the coalition’s five-year term in government – in particular focussing on the government’s decision to downgrade action on violence against women. Cooper will release figures, which Labour have obtained through a Freedom of Information request, that show the police are allowing people who commit domestic abuse to avoid getting a criminal record through what are known as ‘community resolutions’. These alternative forms […]

    Read more →
  • Comment 5 summer reads for the politically minded

    5 summer reads for the politically minded

    Each year I spend a good chunk of the run-up to the Summer holidays cajoling overworked PPCs and stressed-out organisers to take some downtime and read a good book. But, because it’s me, my recommendations are invariably both political and, usually, American in nature. So to save time in future I’ve written down a few great summer reads for my fellow aficionados. Showdown at Gucci Gulch, Alan Murray & Jeffrey Burnbaum In the words of my good friend Mark Dedrick: […]

    Read more →
  • Comment The mess left by the Trojan Horse

    The mess left by the Trojan Horse

    The Peter Clarke report into the Trojan Horse allegations in Birmingham schools is an impressive piece of investigative work marred by some wishy-washy recommendations. But it deserved more than it got from the new Education Secretary, Nicky Morgan in the Commons. The overall impression everyone is left with is that something nasty happened in only a handful of schools, and that Birmingham City Council could have done something about it earlier. The City Council has, broadly speaking, taken that on […]

    Read more →