Labour set to back Leveson compromise? – Media and blog round up: February 11th 2013

12th February, 2013 10:27 am

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Labour set to back Leveson compromise?

“The Labour Party has signalled it may accept a Royal Charter on press regulation, but is seeking assurances that ministers will not be able to amend it. The Tories will today publish a draft charter as an alternative to Lord Justice Leveson’s recommendation for a statute to underpin a new regulator. The charter would establish a system of verifying that a new regulator set up by the press had the independence and powers recommended by the judge. Labour had initially insisted on a statute to underpin the new regulator and pledged to force the issue to a vote in the House of Commons. However, Harriet Harman, the Shadow Culture Secretary, yesterday indicated that the charter idea, put forward by Oliver Letwin, the Cabinet Office Minister, could be acceptable.” – The Times (£)

Infrastructure-shambles?

“Only seven of the 576 major building projects in the Government’s much-trumpeted national infrastructure plan have been completed, according to a report out today. Only 1 per cent of the schemes are operational and just 18 per cent are said to have “started” or to be “under construction”. The figures, compiled by Labour from Treasury figures, will fuel demands from Liberal Democrat ministers for the Coalition to do more to kick-start the economy.” – The Independent

Eastleigh Tory candidate under fire over plagiarism from Wikipedia

“The Conservative candidate in the by-election for disgraced Chris Huhne’s seat has been caught lifting a Wikipedia entry for a campaign website. Maria Hutchings copied an extract from the online encyclopedia about the Roman past of Eastleigh, Hampshire. The website said: “The modern town of Eastleigh lies on the old Roman road, built in A.D.79 between Winchester (Venta Belgarum) and Bitterne (Clausentum). Roman remains discovered in the Eastleigh area, including a Roman lead coffin excavated in 1908, indicate that a settlement probably existed here in Roman times.” The section was lifted word for word from the Wikipedia page on the Hampshire town and made a mockery of the Tories’ claim she was “is in tune with the community.”” – The Mirror

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