Rennard – who knew what and when? And why did he quit? – Media and blog round up: February 26th 2013

February 26, 2013 10:54 am

Subscribers to our morning email get the best of LabourList – including the Media and blog round up – every weekday morning. If you’d signed up you would have got this over an hour ago. You can sign up here.

Rennard – who knew what and when? And why did he quit?

“This newspaper [The Telegraph] contacted Jonny Oates, who is now the Deputy Prime Minister’s chief of staff, in April 2010 with five specific allegations of incidents allegedly involving Lord Rennard. The disclosure will add to the growing pressure on the Liberal Democrat leader who said last night that his office had only been aware of “non-specific” allegations surrounding the peer until last week.” – The Telegraph
“Senior Liberal Democrats suggested for the first time on Monday that Lord Rennard had not stood down as the party’s chief executive for health reasons, but after pressure from Nick Clegg’s office and the then party president over general allegations of sexual impropriety.” – Guardian
“The Liberal Democrats have slumped to their lowest rating in a national opinion poll, as the party struggles against claims of a cover-up surrounding the alleged behaviour of its former chief executive, Lord Rennard. The party is on just 8%, down two points from last month, while Ukip is on 9%, according to a survey for the Independent by ComRes. The poll shows Labour up four points on 43% and the Conservatives on 31%, down one point. Other parties are unchanged on 9%.” – Guardian

“Scotland Yard says it is looking at “whether or not criminal activity has taken place” after claims of sexual impropriety by former Liberal Democrat chief executive Lord Rennard. In a statement on its website, the Met said its Specialist Investigations Command had been “approached by officials in the Liberal Democrat Party following recent media reporting”.” – BBC

Electricians hit hardest by blacklisting

“A study by the GMB union has broken down the victims by their occupations for the first time and electricians were twice as likely as labourers to be blacklisted. Union officials believe they were targeted for being most likely to raise health and safety concerns on dangerous construction sites. The union is demanding a full public inquiry into the scandal of blacklisting and the 3,213-name list of construction workers, which was used to vet job applicants who were denied employment for union activity or raising health and safety issues.” – Mirror

Other highlights

Latest

  • Comment As the PPC in Iain Duncan Smith’s constituency, Ed has taught me two important lessons

    As the PPC in Iain Duncan Smith’s constituency, Ed has taught me two important lessons

    Ed Miliband has tackled the issue of his perceived image problem. Rather than embarrassingly excuse himself or convince the public he is something he is not, he has embraced his own persona, accepting it in order to extinguish the ongoing media analysis of who he is rather than what he stands for. This move shows courage, political prowess and most of all, it’s set the stage for next year’s election to be about policy rather than personalities. I cannot tell […]

    Read more →
  • Featured Cameron condemned for immigration PR stunt

    Cameron condemned for immigration PR stunt

    Yesterday, David Cameron offered an ominous threat to people who are deemed to be ‘illegal immigrants’, when he said “we will find you and make sure you are sent back to the country you came from.”  Who knew he meant this literally?  This announcement was worrying enough in itself – such a threat demonises immigrants and ignores the many reasons people might be in the UK illegally – but the PM decided to take his intimidating statement one step further. Cameron, […]

    Read more →
  • Comment Cameron dropped Gove, now Labour must drop his policies

    Cameron dropped Gove, now Labour must drop his policies

    Fireworks, champagne corks popping and rare mashups of Hallelujah and Ode to Joy were heard echoing down the corridors from staffrooms across England and Wales in response to the news that Michael Gove had at long last been sacked as Secretary of State for Education. Forget the unpopularity of his policies, his mishandling of the scandal over suspected attempts to indoctrinate Birmingham’s children to Islamic extremism or his inability to work with anyone from teachers to the Home Secretary – […]

    Read more →
  • News Labour outraised the Tories in 2013, but financial worries still remain

    Labour outraised the Tories in 2013, but financial worries still remain

    The Electoral Commission’s annual report of party finances has been published for 2013, and it turns out that Labour actually raised more money than the Conservatives last year – by almost £8 million. Labour raised £33.4m, while the Tories raised just £25.4m. As George Eaton points out, over at the New Statesman, much of Labour’s advantage comes from short money (the money opposition parties receive from the state). However, this only amounts to £6.9m, meaning Labour still raised roughly an […]

    Read more →
  • Comment We need a Mayor who offers London serious alternatives

    We need a Mayor who offers London serious alternatives

     Speaking at the launch of Labour’s summer campaign last week Ed Miliband said “We need a new leadership: Leadership that thinks deeply and offers creative, new ideas. Leadership that seeks to be faithful to principle, even when it’s hard to do. Leadership that listens and cares.” His eyes, of course, are set on the general election but he could have been talking about the London mayoral campaign. This time next year a very short primary season will be in full […]

    Read more →