Labour MEPs vote against plans to overturn EU budget deal

March 13, 2013 4:22 pm

As expected, Labour MEPs today voted against plans to amend the EU budget deal – otherwise known as the  the Multi-Annual Financial Framework (or the EU seven year budget) – and urged “restraint” on spending. Their leader Glenis Willmott said:

“Labour MEPs today voted against calls to reject the MFF budget deal. Instead we supported the view that restraint needs to shown in the current financial climate.”

“Although we fully support measures to boost jobs and growth by focusing spending on research and development, infrastructure and combating youth unemployment , we believe this must be done through efficient and effective spending.”

Update: So with this being Europe, nothing is ever as simple as it sounds. Here’s what has happened – Eu governments agreed that the EU budget should be cut in real terms, but a majority of the EU Parliament voted to reject the deal agreed by EU governments, instead favouring further rises in the EU budget. (With us so far?) Labour MEPs voted not to reject the deal struck by EU governments, and opposed the view taken by most of the Socialist group in the European parliament, who favour a higher EU budget.

Or to put it another way – Labour MEPs today voted with Tory and UKIP MEPs on EU budget plans?

Clear? We hope so…

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