Nick Raynsford to stand down as Greenwich and Woolwich MP

March 22, 2013 6:45 pm

Nick Raynsford – who has represented Greenwich and Woolwich for 21 years – announced last night that he’s standing down as MP at the next election.

Before being elected to the Greenwich seat, Raynsford served for a year as MP for Fulham from 1986-87. After being elected in 1992 by beating the SDP’s Rosie Barnes by a narrow margin, Raynsford has gone on to make the seat solidly and safely Labour. He served in a variety of government departments before returning to the backbenches in 2005, and in 2009 he called for Gordon Brown to step down as Prime Minister.

It has yet to be decided whether the seat will be an open selection or Aws – nonetheless, Len Duvall – the leader of the Labour Group on the LGA – has said he’s interested in the seat. Other potential frontrunners for include local councillor Matthew Pennycook, and former CLP Vice-Chair and businessman David Prescott.

However don’t get too carried away with the selection just yet – it’s likely to be months before it’s officially underway.

Latest

  • News “Let us face the future” – Angela Eagle’s speech to the National policy Forum

    “Let us face the future” – Angela Eagle’s speech to the National policy Forum

    The National Policy Forum(NPF) meets this weekend in Milton keynes – here’s NPF Chair Angela Eagle’s opening speech, in which she invokes the spirit of 1945: It is a great honour to open this meeting of the National Policy Forum at such a crucial moment for our Party and for our country. But first before I look forward to the weekend I want to look back. When I was elected Chair of Labour’s NEC nearly a year ago, I took […]

    Read more →
  • Comment What should we hope for from the NPF? That a bold, radical manifesto remains on the table

    What should we hope for from the NPF? That a bold, radical manifesto remains on the table

    Today nearly two hundred delegates arrive at a conference centre/hotel on the edge of Milton Keynes to begin Labour’s “final stage” meeting of the National Policy Forum(NPF). It’s possible to both understate and overstate the significance of this weekend. On one hand, this is the biggest weekend in the party’s calendar when it comes to policy. The level of boldness and radicalism that we see coming out of Milton Keynes will define the kind of campaign Labour wants to run in […]

    Read more →
  • Featured Shadow Cabinet rankings – who is the runaway winner?

    Shadow Cabinet rankings – who is the runaway winner?

    In the past we used to do a monthly “shadow cabinet rankings” to give LabourList readers an opportunity to have their say on who they were happy with and who they weren’t. The last time we did such a survey back in 2013, Andy Burnham was the runaway winner. Today we’ve got the latest shadow cabinet rankings, and Burnham is – if anything – further ahead of his colleagues than he was before. First though – a quick explanation of […]

    Read more →
  • Featured News Where Labour now stands on rail – and what the NPF must decide

    Where Labour now stands on rail – and what the NPF must decide

    Nick Robinson reported earlier this evening that “Labour will soon unveil a promise to change the law to allow for the part re-nationalisation of the rail network.” Except that’s not exactly the case. Tomorrow the National Policy Forum (NPF) will begin meeting in Milton Keynes for their all important three day meeting. Once there delegates will be voting on a wide range of potential Labour Party policy positions – rail will be one of those areas discussed tomorrow afternoon. Sources […]

    Read more →
  • News Boris’ economic advisor wants to hike interest rates to 6%

    Boris’ economic advisor wants to hike interest rates to 6%

      Gerard Lyons, the Chief Economic Advisor to Boris Johnson, has today said that interest rates should be raised to “5 or 6%” – an increase that could see the price of mortgage payments in London double to over £4,000 a month. The Governor of the Bank of England has said that he would like to see rates return t 2.5% in time, but when questioned by London Assembly Members, Lyons said: “I would sooner be five or six [per […]

    Read more →