What the papers are saying about press regulation – Media and Blog round up: March 19th 2013

March 19, 2013 10:55 am

Subscribers to our morning email get the best of LabourList – including the Media and blog round up – every weekday morning.  If you were a subscriber you would have already received this in your inbox. You can sign up here.

Press Regulation – what the papers are saying

“The deal done should unblock the government’s legislative programme, and secure early passage of a defamation bill, a potentially momentous advance for free speech. But doubts continue to linger, not only about powerful titles setting up secessionist self-regulators but also about fears of ruinously punitive damages for publications prospectively outside the system, such as Private Eye. After doing a deal among themselves, the politicians will breathe a sigh of relief and hope they can move on. But as the industry alights on grievances, both real and hyperbolic, the political class as a whole could discover that the brokering has only just begun.” - Guardian

“The near unanimity in Parliament yesterday in support of the new approach was a powerful indication of how far the press needs to move in order to restore faith in its regulatory structure. The three party leaders urged the newspaper industry to endorse the new dispensation as quickly as possible. However, after 318 years of a free press, its detail deserves careful consideration.” - Telegraph

“The Sun thinks celebrations are premature. Yes, it is welcome that Parliament seems to have stepped back from the worst case scenario — full-scale control of papers by politicians. And yes, The Sun is committed to tougher rules that safeguard the public. But much remains to be studied before the Royal Charter can be accepted as the foundation stone of new regulation.” - The Sun

“The final outcome is a clever one. The regulatory regime will rest on a Royal Charter, as is already used to oversee, for example, the BBC. There will be statute, but only a single clause – appended to the Enterprise and Regulatory Reform Bill – which specifies that the charter can be amended only according to its own provisions, in this case a two-thirds majority of Parliament. Thus, the danger that press supervision would be at the whim of the Privy Council, as is usual with a Royal Charter, is neutered. The result is a regulator that is independent of the press and also, crucially, of ministers.” - Independent

Boris admits he wants to be PM

“Boris Johnson has admitted that he would like to be prime minister but insists “it’s not going to happen”. In a forthcoming BBC 2 documentary, the mayor of London says he thinks the job of PM is “very, very tough”.” - BBC

“In a BBC documentary, Mr Johnson said that he did not expect to lead, but would relish the prospect of being Prime Minister if it came about. “I think it’s a very tough job being prime minister,” he said. “Obviously, if the ball came loose from the back of a scrum — which it won’t — it would be a great, great thing to have a crack at. But it’s not going to happen.”” - Telegraph

Other highlights

Latest

  • Featured Cameron condemned for immigration PR stunt

    Cameron condemned for immigration PR stunt

    Yesterday, David Cameron offered an ominous threat to people who are deemed to be ‘illegal immigrants’, when he said “we will find you and make sure you are sent back to the country you came from.”  Who knew he meant this literally?  This announcement was worrying enough in itself – such a threat demonises immigrants and ignores the many reasons people might be in the UK illegally – but the PM decided to take his intimidating statement one step further. Cameron, […]

    Read more →
  • Comment Cameron dropped Gove, now Labour must drop his policies

    Cameron dropped Gove, now Labour must drop his policies

    Fireworks, champagne corks popping and rare mashups of Hallelujah and Ode to Joy were heard echoing down the corridors from staffrooms across England and Wales in response to the news that Michael Gove had at long last been sacked as Secretary of State for Education. Forget the unpopularity of his policies, his mishandling of the scandal over suspected attempts to indoctrinate Birmingham’s children to Islamic extremism or his inability to work with anyone from teachers to the Home Secretary – […]

    Read more →
  • News Labour outraised the Tories in 2013, but financial worries still remain

    Labour outraised the Tories in 2013, but financial worries still remain

    The Electoral Commission’s annual report of party finances has been published for 2013, and it turns out that Labour actually raised more money than the Conservatives last year – by almost £8 million. Labour raised £33.4m, while the Tories raised just £25.4m. As George Eaton points out, over at the New Statesman, much of Labour’s advantage comes from short money (the money opposition parties receive from the state). However, this only amounts to £6.9m, meaning Labour still raised roughly an […]

    Read more →
  • Comment We need a Mayor who offers London serious alternatives

    We need a Mayor who offers London serious alternatives

     Speaking at the launch of Labour’s summer campaign last week Ed Miliband said “We need a new leadership: Leadership that thinks deeply and offers creative, new ideas. Leadership that seeks to be faithful to principle, even when it’s hard to do. Leadership that listens and cares.” His eyes, of course, are set on the general election but he could have been talking about the London mayoral campaign. This time next year a very short primary season will be in full […]

    Read more →
  • News The Choice on the Economy – read the full text of Ed Balls’ speech

    The Choice on the Economy – read the full text of Ed Balls’ speech

    It’s great to be back here in Bedford supporting your campaign. Because it’s vital that we win here in this marginal constituency – and in seats across this region from Stevenage to Ipswich, Watford to Waveney – if we are to get the Tories out, elect a Labour government and start to rebuild our country for the future. Seats where we lost in 2010. Seats where we have worked hard to show that under Ed Miliband’s leadership we have changed […]

    Read more →