Labour Party responds to Blair’s New Statesman piece

11th April, 2013 11:22 am

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Tony Blair’s New Statesman piece – released this morning – has promopted the following reaction from the Labour Party:

“It is always important to listen to Tony Blair because he has important points to make, including in this article where he emphasises our top priority must be growth and jobs. As he was the first to recognise, politics always has to move on to cope with new challenges and different circumstances. For example, on immigration, Labour is learning lessons about the mistakes in office and crafting an immigration policy that will make Britain’s diversity work for all not just a few. It is by challenging old ways of doing things, showing we have understood what we did right and wrong during our time in office that One Nation Labour will win back people’s trust.”

Or to put it another way – ‘thanks your your input, Tony…but we’re doing it our way…’

  • Chilbaldi

    They haven’t taken Tony’s good advice basically.

  • AlanGiles

    I should have thought Mr Blair would have been too busy buying himself a new hat and outfit for next Wednesday’s extravaganza, to have worried his little head about anything else. The hair-do and make-up to worry about…. Then, of course, there’s the flowers – and since times are tight, that will mean an early morning visit to the local park with a pair of scissors.

    Oh dear, an ex war leaders work is never done………..It’s all go, ducks! :-)

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Mike-Homfray/510980099 Mike Homfray

    A very sour little piece from Blair. He doesn’t seem to recognise that things have moved on.
    For example, Labour have under Ed’s leadership, started to recognise the limitations of globalisation and its negative effect. Hence the revisions of immigration and European policy.
    And if we can’t show common empathy with people whose lives are being attacked by the mistaken direction of so-called ‘welfare reform’, then why have a Labour party at all?

    • ToffeeCrisp

      “why have a Labour party at all?”
      Frankly, I’ve been asking myself that since 2001. My membership lapsed shortly afterwards.

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=715486331 Alex Otley

      I wish he would leave with dignity.

  • Jimmy Sands

    Tony’s piece was spot on. I don’t understand why the party would adopt the tory press narrative that it’s an attack when it’s nothing of the sort. It’s precisely this sort of reaction that makes me pessimistic about 2015. It would be nice to think would do something about those two cretinous ppcs this morning but I won’t hold my breath.

  • Pingback: Sorry Tony – But Being ‘Dispassionate’ Would Be A Recipe for Bloodless Technocracy | After Nyne()

  • Dave Postles

    When has he attacked Pinky and Smirky? Does anyone recollect any critique of them?

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