Has David Cameron lost the plot?

18th June, 2013 8:27 am

Once upon a time David Cameron was known for his deft handling of the public mood. Not anymore. Last night, he tweeted:

This is a Prime Minister who is often lambasted as “out of touch”, at a time when half a million people are being driven to using Foodbanks because they can’t afford to eat.

We’re all in this together, right?

  • Jonathan Roberts

    Prawn cocktail, roast beef and apple crumble is a pretty basic dinner
    to give to world leaders. Unless we’re suggesting not giving
    Presidents and Prime Ministers a single meal during the week, I think
    this is a dinner that is pretty respectful of the economic situation and
    that’s probably why he tweeted it.

  • Wanzle

    Isn’t the point that tweeting the menu, which was eaten by Obama amongst others, gives great publicity to Northern Irish companies/food regions? Kettyle beef, Bushmills Whisky and Kirkeel – all Northern Irish.

    I’d much prefer G8 leaders ate a fancy dinner that gave a boost to UK business than have an austerity dinner which doesn’t really benefit anyone.

  • Mark Myword

    What a silly article. Is Cameron supposed to give Obama, Putin et al Sainsbury’s Basic Beans on toast? For a gathering of important world leaders, who are the guests of the UK dont forget, this seems like a modest enough dinner.

  • John Ruddy

    There’s a difference between doing that, and then boasting about the grub you’re eating. You might even call it rubbing people’s noses in it.

  • rekrab

    Can’t see this menu being stored in the food banks?

  • http://twitter.com/waterwards dave stone

    Not much of a choice for vegetarians – if I had been invited I would’ve had to spend the evening in the bar.

    Would be such a shame to miss Cameron’s attempt to drum up support for arming Al Qaeda affiliated jihadists.

  • http://twitter.com/waterwards dave stone

    “Sainsbury’s Basic Beans on toast?”

    No. Chicken tikka masala would be better – it’s the UK’s national dish.

    • rekrab

      All left overs gratefully received by the pot licking Pickles!LoL!

  • Monkey_Bach

    I can’t help noting that Ed Balls and Yvette Cooper, despite their parliamentary salaries and oodles of money coming in from “other interests”, regularly claimed about £600.00 a month between them, in expenses, to help meet their food bills. Most politicos are divorced from the trial and tribulations that “ordinary” people have to deal with on a daily basis, which is probably why they eagerly make so many bad decisions whenever given half a chance. I doubt that any MP goes home to a plate of egg and chips and a mug of tea after a hard day’s politicking despite the rise of food banks and growing poverty abounding in our nation.

    Eeek.

  • trotters1957

    Most people’s comments have missed the point. The point is that Cameron’s judgement is poor. No-one expects them to eating beans on toast but why publicise this. It just invites criticism, that’s the point of the article.

  • Bobby

    Are people really saying visiting heads of govt should be fed at a food bank? British food used to be the laughing stock of the world but has made an incredible comeback, using every opportunity to promote it including when Brown got Jamie Oliver to cook for the G20 leaders is good.

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