Majority of voters back borrowing over the next year to build council homes

June 5, 2013 9:57 pm

More than half of the population are in favour of borrowing more in the next year to build more council houses and create jobs in the construction sector, according to the latest LabourList/Survation polling. 55.4% of the public would support such a plan, with only 22.5% opposed.

Such an investment in housing infrastructure to alleviate Britain’s housing crisis and provide jobs is the favoured option of voters from all major parties, across all age groups, genders, social and economic classes and regions/nations of the UK. 73.9% of Labour supporters would back such a course of action, as would 47.7% of Tories, 55% of Lib Dems and 43.2% of UKIPers.

This is the penultimate question in a set of polling data which we’ve been revealing each day this week on LabourList, as we seek to find a way towards “Securing Economic Credibility” for the party in a way that is also true to Labour values and electorally viable.

securing economic recovery housing

What is particularly interesting about this polling is the difference with what we revealed yesterday. Whilst nearly half of the population told us that they favoured higher borrowing in exchange for investment in growth and jobs, far more people supported such a plan when the kind of spending – in this case on housing – was made clear. In government Labour were able to make the case for higher National Insurance to fund the NHS, and this form of hypothecated spending pledge could be a template for how Labour acts in government – including people in the debate about how their money should be spent.

Whilst yesterday the majority of Tory supporters were against borrowing more money to fund jobs and growth, today a plan to borrow for investment in housing has a lead of nearly 17 points amongst Tory voters over the alternative (keeping borrowing down) – suggesting that this is a plan that shouldn’t be limited to Labour’s policy thinking, it could work for the Tories too, if they were minded to borrow for homes and growth, rather than borrowing as a result of strategic failure…

One final point – normally when questions are asked about housing, they revolve either around house-building as a whole or “affordable” housing. We wanted to be very clear that what we were talking about in this survey is “council housing” – built, owned and run by local authorities to serve the needs of local people. This may have depressed the numbers supporting it somewhat, but there’s still a clear plurality of voters in favour of building more council homes – and it’s a policy that resonates across the country, and across party lines.

What are you waiting for Mr Cameron? Build more homes. And if you won’t – Mr Miliband will need to…

Survation interviewed 1,121 adults aged 18 and over via online panel on May 24th 2013. The results have been weighted to the profile of all adults, and the data for the question referred to in this post can be found here

  • http://www.facebook.com/matthew.blott Matthew Blott

    I have no issue with this and cannot understand why Labour wasn’t saying this twelve months ago. And unlike 2far2fast voters clearly understand what this means.

  • AlanGiles

    No man is a prophet in his own country, but many of us have been calling for the building of council housing for DECADES. Like others, I was concerned when the late Mrs Thatcher started to sell of the public stock and not allow councils to rebuild, back in 1980/81.

    With a landslide majority and a healthy economy in both 1997 and 2001 many of us hoped and expected Blair to institute such a policy (a legacy of housing would have been far preferable to a legacy of wars), but as Hazel Blears revealed in a rare moment of truth nobody in New Labour “was interested” in social housing – probably because they were too busy flipping their second homes and buying expensive silk furnishings at our expense.

    It makes every sort of sense, both economic and morally to build homes for people who will never be able to afford to buy one of their own, and who are currently fleeced by private landlords.

    However – the big question today – and today as I write this it is 0520BST on 6th June 2013, so I hope it appears before the summer solstice, the “Eds” are so busy with their “iron discipline” financial soundbite, will they use this as yet another excuse not to do the right thing?

    • leslie48

      I think you will find from recent speeches that the Labour leaders have both advocated capital spending on building more homes to help jobs, economic growth and supply more homes to lessen the shortage of houses which puts money in Landlord’s pockets & means the state pays housing benefits. You seem to be inventing a straw man. This is basic Labour policy.

  • JoeDM

    I bet they’d also support the “Right to Buy” as well, if you asked them !!!

  • Pingback: Destined to Fail | John Rentoul | Independent Eagle Eye Blogs

  • leslie48

    Ed Milliband said the Government had “no answers to Britain’s housing crisis” and criticised the lack of house building, claiming housing completions are at their lowest level since the 1920s. Reported by the press during the Queens speech debate 16th May. Balls discussed the same issue at last years conference. Looks to me like a no brainer if we can’t promise to build more homes we may as well fold up out tents( no pun intended)

Latest

  • Featured Is Labour ready to appeal unashamedly to England?

    Is Labour ready to appeal unashamedly to England?

    Is Labour ready to appeal unashamedly to England? Whilst many party members feel (as I do) more British than English, that actually makes it more important to answer the question. Because whilst the Labour Party has in the past decade been more than comfortable in speaking directly to Scotland (something which is obviously in focus at the moment) and Wales (somewhere that is obviously under fire from the Tories at the moment), the same can’t be said about England. Sure, we’ve […]

    Read more →
  • News Why are the Lib Dems so shy?

    Why are the Lib Dems so shy?

    Regular readers will know that we’re always keeping an eye on Lib Dems leaflets. Their local propaganda sheets are always good for a questionable bar chart, or forgetting the name of the generic place their text is for – but they can also be quite shy about their party affiliation too. For example, take the “Islington Chronicle”. Sounds like a local paper, and there’s no Lib Dem logo and barely a splash of their trademark yellow. But it is, in […]

    Read more →
  • News Scotland Seats and Selections Have the Tories given up on Scotland?

    Have the Tories given up on Scotland?

    This morning we noted that the Tories haven’t selected candidates in nearly half of the most marginal Labour and Lib Dem seats. But what’s particularly telling is that in over 60% of target seats in the Midlands and the North they have so far failed to select a candidate, while the Independent claims that in Scotland there are no Tory parliamentary candidates at all. However, Mark Wallace over at ConHome notes that the Tories have in fact selected a total of two […]

    Read more →
  • News Labour go on UKIP offensive

    Labour go on UKIP offensive

    Labour have gone on the attack against UKIP, following the launch of their European election campaign over the weekend. Releasing a statement from Jon Ashworth, the Shadow Cabinet Office Minister, the response focusses on how right-wing UKIP are - suggesting this change of tack is to designed to put Labour supporters off switching their vote to Farage’s party. Ashworth said: “UKIP would have us believe they stand for working people but the truth is very different – they’re even more right […]

    Read more →
  • News Seats and Selections Tories yet to select candidates in nearly half of marginals

    Tories yet to select candidates in nearly half of marginals

    Out of the 75 most marginal Labour and Lib Dem held seats, the Conservatives have selected only 41 candidates for the next election, according to the Independent. Labour, on the other hand, have selected candidates in all but two of their top 50 target seats: With only a year to go until the general election, this shortage seems to suggest the Tories are not expecting to gain many seats. By this stage in a parliament, a party hoping to make […]

    Read more →