Who might stand for the Labour leadership?

9th May, 2015 10:53 am

We look at the potential candidates for the Labour leadership. If you know of anyone we might have missed please let us know on [email protected]

Andy Burnham

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Burnham is currently Labour’s Shadow Health Secretary, a role he has held since October 2011. Popular with activists (as our regular Shadow Cabinet rankings attest), Burnham is seen as a passionate advocate of the state’s role in public services. He’s likely to get support from the left of the party as well as potentially attracting union support too. However his perceived move from right to left over the past five years has raised eyebrows.

Yvette Cooper

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The Shadow Home Secretary is perhaps the most prominent female member of Labour’s top team (save perhaps acting leader Harriet Harman). Cooper is considered a serious intellect and a strong media performer. She’s been an MP since 1997 and has serious front-line political experience. However with husband Ed Balls having lost his seat on May 7th, might a tilt at the leadership come so soon after a difficult election?

Mary Creagh

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Currently Labour’s Shadow Minister for International Development, Creagh has held a number of senior party roles, also shadowing DEFRA and (relatively briefly) Transport too. The Wakefield MP (and one time leader of Labour’s group of councillors in Islington) is a dark horse in this race, but is already canvassing Labour MPs. Her argument is likely to be that she has more experience than some, and less baggage than others.

Dan Jarvis

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Former paratrooper, marathon runner and disarmer of muggers, Dan Jarvis has been an MP for the least amount of time of all mooted contenders, having only been elected in a by-election during the last Parliament. His easy going manner belies a steely determination and drive which seems him working long days in Parliament and on the campaign trail. Difficult to pin down ideologically, which may be either an advantage or a disadvantage.

Liz Kendall

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Shadow Social Care Minister Liz Kendall is often categorised as a Blairite, yet the Leicester West MP is perhaps more accurately defined by her interest in the politics of power and where it lies in society. An advocate of the devolution agenda with an interest in pushing power down to people, keen runner Kendall could be one of the 2010 intake who throws their hat into the ring.

David Lammy

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Former Business, Innovation and Skills Minister David Lammy has already said that he wants to run as Labour’s candidate for London Mayor next year, but with nominations for that selection not yet open, he is reportedly considering a tilt at the leadership instead. Lammy’s mayoralty candidacy has been defined by his focus on housing, communities and a pro-immigration stanc

Chuka Umunna

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A strong media performer who can be very persuasive on TV, Umunna was one of the most prominent members of the 2010 intake, and has been talked of as a future Labour leader since before he was even elected. As Shadow Business Secretary Umunna was seen as someone business could do business with. Meanwhile, his perceived political movement from a Compassite to someone more likely to work with Progress surprised many.

Other potential candidates

Caroline Flint – a strong media performer, Flint has excelled in the energy brief – an important role for Labour over the last five years. Seen as on the right of the Party, her loyalty to Ed won her loyalty in return from activists.

Tristram Hunt – thoughtful, studious and widely considered to have handled the education brief well, Hunt could be the dark horse moderniser candidate.

John McDonnell – If the leftist campaign group decide to run a candidate for leader, it will almost certainly be McDonnell (with Diane Abbott making it clear her interest lies in running for London Mayor). He ran against Gordon Brown in 2007  and again 2010, but failed to reach the requisite level of nominations each time to go forward.

Rachel Reeves – one of Labour’s biggest stars after just five years as an MP. But as she is just about to go on maternity leave now may not be the best time for her to be running a campaign.

With the dust not yet settling on this election defeat, there may well be more people considering their options – this by no means a comprehensive list.

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  • greenwich

    Burnham is unapologetic about Iraq and in denial about Mid Staffs. Those are two hostages to fortune that Labour would have to be in a suicidal mood to accept. But you never know with Labour…

    • Tim Mullen

      Honestly does anyone outside Scotland still believe Iraq is an issue on the doorstep now, or that it will be in 2020? If they do they are delusional. As for Mid Staffs, it wasn’t enough to get Kate Godfrey elected in Stafford, and when faced with what’s going to happen to health and social care in the next year, let alone five years, will be a non-issue to voters.

      • greenwich

        Iraq wasn’t even much of a doorstep issue in 2005 as I recall. I gave it as one of two examples of a man who is unable to show people that he is willing to acknowledge mistakes. Boris Johnson also voted for Iraq but he will slaughter Burnham in the 2020 leaders’ debates on the NHS. But, as I and the person above me has noted, Labour activists are nothing if not blinkered, so it comes as no surprise to learn from the news just now that Burnham is favourite.

      • bevinboy

        One word shoots you down.

        Chilcott.

      • Matthew

        Iraq seems to come up every time you talk to an SNP voter.

        • greenwich

          Thank you. I did not know that. I am liking the SNP voters more and more. Maybe they found the moral compasses that fell out of Labour activists’ pockets when they rose to give Tony Blair his standing ovations at the conference.

    • Michael Worcester

      Denying he was more responsible for privatising the NHS (4%) campared to 2% for the Tories, more deaths in mid staffs than have died in Iraq, and drinking from vases

      He never gave a satisfactory answer during the campaign why does anyone think he will be more effective answering this in the next 5 years?

  • Sunny Jim

    Dan Jarvis is the correct choice if you’re viewing it from the perspective of a voter on the street who doesn’t obsess about politics.

    He won’t be chosen though.

    The base will go for who they perceive to match up to their own idea of an ideal choice which means Burnham.

    Who will then turn Labour’s strongest card (the NHS) in to a weakness as he defends his reocrd as health secretary with everything that went on in that time.

    It’s so predictable and avoidable.

    • wolfman

      One thing Burnham has going for him though is the common touch…

      Not that I want him to win but he doesn’t come across as “One of them”….

      Poor old Ed did unfortunately..

    • Marco

      Is the NHS really a strong Labour card now? If it is, how do we account for voters saying ‘the NHS matters to me’ and then voting Conservative? I think this is a bit of received wisdom which is getting a little out of date. Only labour activists and tribal supporters seem to be convinced that the Tories want to destroy the NHS…

      • bevinboy

        That is because while some party activists think we own the NHS, it is plainly not true.

        Labour had said for years that the Tories are the enemy of the NHS and would privatise it, but that has not been manifested in the history.

        So it is not treated as a serious threat. It is disregarded.

        If one main message is disregarded, the rest of the messages are damaged. the people around Miliband never worked this out.

        Similarly with “austerity”. For many voters, in work, with cheap mortgages and some of the things they buy like food, road fuel, electronic goods, relatively cheap and becoming more affordable, those voters do not see “austerity” themselves. even their summer holiday is cheaper as the pound strengthens

        For them, if “austerity” just means benefit cuts for the indolent, they like the sound of that.

        A messages or messages that only cut through to the faithful or those dependent on the state, is not good enough to win over the people that Blair pulled in three times.

        Miliband’s campaigning sounded like the record was stuck . The team he pulled together were just not smart enough to tell him the truth about the messages.

        • Ian

          I agree. The majority of people did not recognise the Britain poor old Ed was describing, because for them it wasn’t their daily experience. Labour must stop preaching to the 10% who will always vote for them and address the other 90%..

        • Ken Burch

          Are you arguing that Labour should keep silently accepting the Tory notion that people on benefit are generally “indolent” and deserved to be harried?

          In case you missed the entire campaign, Ed Balls made sure that Labour did precisely that. The result was a 26 seat loss.

          There is no evidence that a Labour campaign that was more unsympathetic and dismissive towards the jobless would have gained more votes, or that Labour would even still be a different party than the Tories if it did what you call for and appealed mainly to the smug and socially unconcerned-none of whom have any non-Tory views on anything that matters.

          • bevinboy

            Dear dear, this is difficult..

            OF COURSE NOT. I am arguing that in terms of campaign rhetoric we have to cut through, to ordinary, hard working, aspirational voters and that rhetoric just based on creating fear of the Tories is plain silly and lost Miliband the election. It was a childish, atavistic, ill thought out campaign, that failed to understand most of Britain.

            I am angry that the people around Miliband were so mind blowingly stupid. That is why I am cautious about a new leader with the same cultural mindset.

            We need to learn from history, on right and left(ish). Thatcher and Blair, love or hate either of them, were able and regularly, to reach out to that aspirational voter

            That voter is often not very political. Appealing just to our core vote is a big mistake, the core vote is shrinking, UKIP are after it. Some of it was never THAT core anyway.

            We need to understand that and deal with it.

          • Michelle

            Amongst many young people the concept of aspiration is dead. Now it’s simply a case of, Can I buy my first home before I hit forty. Times have changed and Labour need to change with them. The mantra, Rise with your class, not above it, is back.

          • Chris Morris

            Surely the wish to buy a home if you do not own one is itself aspirational ? There is a long and complex conversation here but essentially I think bevinboy has a point. Indeed I agree with most of his analysis.

        • Marco

          I think your analysis is spot on.

      • Matthew Blott

        Another good point. Labour has said in every election the Tories are going to privatise the NHS and it doesn’t resonate anymore. People think privatisation means paying for NHS services but the Tories have never proposed this so each time the charge is made and charges don’t follow the argument loses potency. The economy is the issue we need to own.

        • Marco

          Yep. Hard to see this happening in one electoral cycle now, but not impossible…if we make the right leadership choice. We need a really substantial set of leadership campaigns, lots of opportunity for thinking and debating.

          • wildcolonialboy

            That would be a silly mistake; months of navel gazing and backbiting is what allowed the Tories to seize the initiative and control the narrative last time

          • Marco

            No, it isn’t. Labour didn’t lose because Tories seized initiative in the first months. Ed had a good honeymoon period – but he didn’t use it to seize the initiative and define himself. He DID have plenty of opportunity.

        • g978

          Exactly and when Labour say there is a “secret plan to do X” as they did on several issues this election it is just scaremongering. It wasn`t only the Tories that used “fear”. Labour did plenty of that too.

    • bevinboy

      Yey, cannot fault that logic

    • Doug Smith

      The only common sense approach for Burnham is to publicly admit to the errors of the Blair years: the expensive marketisation of the NHS, PFI etc.

      He’ll have to turn over a new leaf if he wants to retain credibility.

    • Matthew Blott

      Indeed. I’m coming out more and more against Burnham and wouldn’t be surprised if a Stop Burnham campaign gets off the ground. The unions will swing behind him but the class war rhetoric will be a disaster in the long run. His credibility is also shot – how can he shamefacedly criticise Conservative privatisation when it’s something he introduced himself?

      • g978

        The Unions wanted Ed and see where that got us. David M would not have lost as badly.

      • sammy gravano

        Aw c’mon, Andy’s privatisation was a different sort of privatisation.

        Apparently.

        So he says.

        • Dave Postles

          Do let us know – he was only Sec of State for Health for nine months.

      • Dave Postles

        Burnham was Sec of State for Health for nine months before May 2010. The initiative for privatization came from Milburn. Burnham commissioned the Francis Report. Burnham has campaigned for the risk register to be revealed for Lansley’s bill. The commissioning of Circle was done by Lansley, with the provision that the deficit for Circle should not exceed £5m. Burnham can quite easily stand against the Tories if he has his wits about him. Still, it’s your party.

    • BillFrancisOConnor

      Yup. 和我零点be

  • Bernie Evans

    “handled education brief well”-Really? Speak to teachers!
    Sadly, I was correct in suspecting that a half page devoted to news involving Tristram Hunt was bound to include much of the same old nonsense to which we have become accustomed since his appointment to the shadow cabinet.(Labour could abandon GCSEs within a decade, Hunt reveals,23/04/15) Every time he makes an announcement like this one, he reveals far more about his ignorance, both of what is happening in the majority of state schools, and of what the majority of their pupils are like, than about his party`s education policy. Where exactly are the schools whose “gates close at 2.55pm”, or the students who lack “character and resilience”? I know of none of the former, and in my forty plus years of teaching in the state sector, I saw very few of the latter, especially as they became so adept at “dealing with the unexpected” every time a government`s new educational initiative involved a change of course, subject, syllabus or teacher!
    It may well “drive him mad” to see these so-called “fortress schools”, if indeed they exist, so why doesn`t he visit them and discuss problems with the heads and staff? What makes, I suspect, many of us even madder is to see a future education secretary miss yet another opportunity to praise teachers and congratulate everyone involved with the huge improvements made in state education in the last twenty years or so; he much prefers, with Gove-like predictability, to emphasise the “long tail of underachievement”, something based on Pisa tests where students from a variety of nations are given different questions, and their results somehow compared. A commitment to address teachers` ridiculous workload would not go amiss, either, and how about an announcement to meet and work with teachers` union leaders on a regular basis to sort out the pay and conditions` problems? After all, he is the Labour spokesperson for education, so it would be refreshing to hear some comments on education which do not sound as if they were drafted by Keith Joseph!

    • liversedge

      Just once it would be nice to hear an Educ Minister say ‘I will listen to you the experts and am keen to see stability not radical change’.

      • g978

        The Education Secretary is there for students and parents not teachers. Don`t mistake the producer interest for the consumer interest.

        • liversedge

          My point is that stability and informed decisions are required.

          From Baker onwards all you hear are Education Ministers making a name for themselves in Education, usually involving massive amounts of change and instability.

          Your point is rather tangential to that if I may say so. It is also a strawman. Oh, and a false dichotomy to boot.

  • Ultra_Fox

    We need a leader from outside the Westminster bubble, untainted by association with the Blair/Brown years and who can withstand the frenzy from the media that goes with this post.

    Dan Jarvis would tick all of these boxes.

    • bevinboy

      Yep. His seeming love for the current damaging EU set up being his only obvious flaw.

      All of the rest, without exception . are tainted losers who Cameron would make mincemeat of and who cannot pull in the disaffected voters who sometimes do vote Labour and who Blair did pull in.

      I want to hear him speak.

      See him grilled by Andrew Marr

      • Matthew Blott

        Fondness for the EU is a plus in my book, the reason we’re nearing the exit door is because too many supporters have stayed silent.

        • bevinboy

          Personally I do not think we ARE near the exit, I think the staying in political Europe argument, is one that can be won. Cameron certainly does not want to leave the political Union

          What cannot be won, is not giving the population a choice. hence (partly) the demise of the two parties fighting against that.

          The political Europe project is very different to what many thought they were getting. So why not a choice?

          Not going along with a referendum, lost us votes to UKIP. It is that simple. It probably cost Ed Balls his seat.

          How stupid is that? Why do that? What, in Labour ideology stops asking the people and laying out the arguments? Even taking a position? Surely not taking a position that denies a vote though.

          Any new leader who still wants to fight against the referendum is starting from behind the start line and cannot easily recover.

          The renegotiation position of the UK would be strengthened by all main parties standing behind it.

          • Matthew Blott

            Should we have a referendum on NATO membership which obliges us to commit armed forces if Islamist Erdogan’s Turkey is attacked? At least we’ve had a referendum on EU membership in the past, we’ve never had one on NATO.

        • Matthew

          I think the longer we refuse to give people a choice the more likely an exit becomes as people vote for parties willing to give people a vote.

          • sammy gravano

            Um the people have just voted for a party willing to give people the vote. Thursday there.

      • sammy gravano

        I’ve never seen the word ‘grilled’ in the same sentence as ‘Andrew Marr’ before.

        He always reminds me of James Nastie interviewing Mad Gordon McRuin with…

        ‘So Prime Minister, what message have you got for the nation today?’.

        • bevinboy

          Yes, too many “Andrews”. Of course I meant to putt Andrew Neil.

          I agree, Marr is a pointless waste of space and the licence fee.

          • sammy gravano

            Everything on BBC is a waste of the licence fee.

    • Matthew Blott

      I thought Ed Miliband’s ‘out of touch’ line never really worked because too many saw him as part of the same metropolitan elite (with some justification). Dan Jarvis would be a very different prospect and as a guy who disarms muggers and served with special forces could easily be spun as The Man To Face Down Putin. Nobody would ever ask him if he’s tough enough.

      • Doug Smith

        “could easily be spun as The Man To Face Down Putin.”

        Indeed. With Dan as leader Labour is sure to receive financial backing from the military-industrial sector.

        • Matthew Blott

          What does that mean?

          • Doug Smith

            If you really want to find out you’d do well to take a look at Chalmers Johnson’s wiki page and read his book Blowback or take a look at Eugene Jarecki’s theeisenhowerproject dotcom

          • Matthew Blott

            Can’t you provide a more simple answer?

          • Marco

            Stop encouraging this person to write things 😉

          • Jane Manby

            that would not allow him to feel superior

          • sammy gravano

            He doesn’t know.

            He read it on a placard at a demo.

            It’s what passes for analysis these days.

      • Adam Peak

        Dan would be my first choice. I wish him well.

      • Jake McQuillan

        ‘ served with special forces ‘

        How many innocents did he kill ?

        • Matthew Blott

          What sort of question is that?

          • Jake McQuillan

            An honest one ..how many innocent people did he murder ?

          • MacGuffin

            None. Special forces don’t ‘murder’ people. What an absurd comment.

          • Matthew Blott

            You’re not from the Greens are you? They have a problem with a country having a defence force as well.

          • MacGuffin

            Don’t get him started. There are far too many people who want to chase after the 1% of voters who left Labour for the Greeniacs, rather than the 5% who went to UKIP, or the uncountables who stayed at home. I despair.

  • Bilious Oesophagus

    The trouble with the Labour leadership is they resemble characters from Thunderbirds..

    • wolfman

      You looked at Cameron lately !!!!!

  • althejazz

    In the meantime, who is going to harass camoron in the House of Commons. The man is an abject coward and a bare faced liar and needs to be held to account for all that his odious party has done over the last five years. We have no time for navel gazing and, quite frankly, I don’t think Ed should have been so quick to resign as he is NOT to blame. The real culprits are Nick Clegg and our electoral system. Yet again Labour got about as many seats as they would have got under PR but the tories have far more with only a slightly higher percentage of the vote. Clegg could have saved us from this but didn’t so he deserves to be kicked into oblivion along with his lickspittle party cronies. The fact is that the vast majority of voters wanted an end to austerity and the only people who were prepared to offer that chance were the SNP and look where we have finished up. What has become clear is that about a third of the electorate are as callous and unfeeling as the neo-nazis of the tory party.

    • J. White

      Nick Clegg was the only politician who pushed for electoral reform. Where are the Labour politicians who should be pushing for radical reform so that power is more widely distributed and more voices heard at Westminster.

    • imw101

      “neo-nazis of the tory party”

      Do you even have any idea what a “Nazi” is?

      But keep it up. The same old delusional mindset that lost you the election and will keep you out of power for 20 years or more.

    • bevinboy

      Godwins Law alert, Godwins Law alert

    • olliebear1516

      ‘The man is an abject coward and a bare faced liar and needs to be held to account for all that his odious party has done over the last five years.’

      ‘We have no time for navel gazing’
      I think someone’s forgotten to take their medication.

      • sammy gravano

        The electorate have just held Cameron to account.

        And 11.3 million liked what they saw.

  • Sandy Andrews

    Time for a woman – Caroline Flint would be a great choice !

    • wolfman

      Wouldn’t mind !!.

    • Monkey_Bach

      Burnt out. Eeek.

  • J. White

    Tristram Hunt adamantly resisted change to the electoral system illustrating an arrogance and unwillingness to reform our rotten political system. Part of Labour’s catastrophe in Scotland lies in the failure to reform so that a more plural politics could be practised there.

    • Matthew Blott

      Good point, I’d forgotten he was a reactionary FPTP advocate.

  • carlton temple-powell

    Andy Burnham and Caroline Flint have a presidential look to them and would certainly present an attractive ticket, appealing to generations across the board. Of course Image has to be backed up by substance but we know these two can deliver. As much as some of us old timers might like to be purists and stick to policy, we learnt from the Blair years that presentation can open doors and make people listen.

    • bevinboy

      Flint in the flesh, thinking on her feet, is unimpressive.

      Burnham is robotic like Umunna

      None of these three is capable of pulling off a coherence that will pull in the legions of voters we have lost.

      • Matthew Blott

        Flint is very good on her feet. One of the few ministers and shadow ministers who never gets duffed up on TV.

  • wolfman

    Think it’s time for a lady but not Iyvette. Someone with a more pleasing personality !!…

    Suspect Burnham will win though. He’s the flavour of the month with the membership…

    • Matthew Blott

      Stella Creasy and Caroline Flint are both very strong – I wish they both had more support.

      • Marco

        Stella C I find a bit hard to like. She’s so bien pensant, predictable. I find her patronising, a bit self righteous. She’s also clever, a good communicator, and she has some serious political skills, so I can see the positives. She’s been more of an issues-based campaigner than anything else so far – I wonder what her big vision is for the Left, for Labour? Hmmm. Now I’ve written that I realise I’m quite interested to find that out…!

      • sammy gravano

        ‘Stella Creasy and Caroline Flint are both very strong – I wish they both had more support.’

        ooh err.

    • SableKeech

      How about Gloria de Piero? Northern, working class, non-Oxbridge, sharp operator, media savvy and has proved she can run a ground campaign by turning a 192 majority in one just shy of 9k. Oh, and proved she can take on Dacre, faced down the Mail over ‘those’ photos.

  • Marco

    No surprises here, except Dan Jarvis perhaps. I hope there are some new and less predictable possibilities emerge over the coming weeks.

    Reeves is a disaster. An automaton who would repeat Ed’s inability to connect.
    Hunt is wet and patronising, poor political skills too.
    Burnham will please the Party and not the electorate.
    Umunna is a sharp suited robot, though he’s clever. Too slimy.
    Lammy is lightweight.

    Caroline Flint and Yvette Cooper I’d like to hear more from. Dan too.

    • Matthew Blott

      Caroline Flint is a knockout. Whenever I’ve heard her she is on top form and is shamefully under appreciated. Stella Creasy is also very good. Miliband didn’t like her apparently and despite the spin we had at Labour List about Miliband promoting talent I didn’t see any evidence for it. He liked to surrond himself with yes men (with the inevitable consequences).

      All your other assessments I pretty much agree with. Reeves – you’re spot on. Utterly boring and sends me and the voters sleep. Ditto Yvette Cooper (although not as bad as Reeves). Lammy a lightweight? Sadly yes. Umunna – slick is the word I’ve used, slimy a bit harsh (although with slick some can see it that way I guess).

      Dan Jarvis gets my vote but I don’t think he’ll get it. I think in the end it will come down to a straight fight between Burnham and Umunna with my vote going to Umunna.

      • Marco

        Flint is really interesting, I agree. And I was a little harsh on Umunna, you’re right! I really hope you’re wrong about it coming down to a fight between Burnham and Umunna – though maybe they have qualities we have not yet seen? I still hope to be surprised by this process, to discover some new talent or something fresh and interesting from someone whose loyalty has kept them circumspect until now. Sometimes I think we just need to leap a generation and find someone completely fresh.

        • g978

          Umunna would accelerate the shift of “old” Labour in the North to UKIP (UKIP is second in over 120 seats). He is slick and has no achievements. He may be a media performer (although he got tangled in some interviews), we need more than that.

          • Marco

            Yeah, I think that’s probably true. The slickness would be a problem. And he talks too much like Blair…

      • bevinboy

        I was at a meeting where Flint had a 20 minute slot to answer questions on her departmental brief.

        She got some difficult questions from the floor and walked out after 7 or 8 minutes, chased by her baffled spad.

        Useless in non planned and controlled situations I concluded.

        Marginally better than a vacancy

    • Bah Humbug

      Very concise, and well put.

    • liversedge

      Dan Jarvis appeals the most.
      Probably because all I know of him is in a NS article.

    • sammy gravano

      Jarvis is available on betfair at 5.3.

      Hardly a surprise candidate.

    • Jimmy Sands

      “Too slimy.”

      And we’ve just seen how much the voters hate that.

  • Charles Knight

    As someone who has voted Labour I would either go for Chuka Umunna or Dan Jarvis. To me, Burnham and Cooper in particular represent failure and the same old crap.

    • Matthew

      Either could work. Chuka if positioned in the centre could do a good job of winning back much of the middle-class, middle-England support Labour seems to have lost under Miliband, with some effective messaging and key policies on a few areas like housing could win over ex-Lib Dems and those on the centre-left. Depends – he reminds me a lot of Blair, in good and bad ways. I don’t get that ‘feeling’ that I can trust him in the same way I got that with Ed. Maybe that’s just me though.

      Dan Jarvis is a very interesting candidate for all the reasons mentioned elsewhere. His background and personality make him almost untouchable to all the attacks that seem to have worked against Miliband, though where he sits ideologically could make all the difference.

      • Charles Knight

        To put my remarks into further context, I’m speaking as someone who votes labour and broadly understands their policies but have no real knowledge or indeed interest in the minutiae of the inner workings of the party or who is friends with who and what clique is in the ascendance. From that perspective a lot of the conversation here are about things that will make no difference to the general public or are odd in the extreme – “Cooper is considered a serious intellect” – for example has been said by no-one nowhere outside of this sort of site – actually I doubt the public could pick any of these people out of a line-up.

      • sammy gravano

        Trust me I’m ‘middle-class, middle-England’.

        And Chuka absolutely stinks.

    • Grouchy Oldgit

      Gotta be Dan. Chuka seems too much like a Tory.

  • Doug Smith

    Dan Jarvis: “Difficult to pin down ideologically”. Jarvis is a vice-chair of Progress – i.e. he’s on the Blairite hard-Right of the Labour Party.

    • Matthew Blott

      When you say things like ‘hard-Right’ you sound like a loon.

      • Doug Smith

        Goodness, Matthew! I thought you’d like to thank me for correctly identifying Dan’s underpinning ideology.

        In my view Dan would be the most appropriate next Labour leader. As a leading Progress appointee he best reflects today’s Labour Party.

        • Matthew Blott

          The term ‘hard Right’ should be used where it applies: fascists. When you use it against someone you disagree with it sounds like a smear and you lose the argument.

          • sammy gravano

            Nothing ‘smear’ about calling someone ‘hard right’.

            If you want ‘smears’ look at Damien McBride.

          • Jimmy Sands

            You could simply post a link to Guido rather than cutting and pasting his blog here. Just a thought.

    • SableKeech

      Got John Mann’s backing, difficult to paint John as a right winger.

      • sammy gravano

        Does John Mann have his wife on the payroll (our payroll) but under her ‘professional name’ which isn’t ‘Mann’?

        Just asking.

        • SableKeech

          Yes, and he declares it on the Register of Interests. And your point is?

          • sammy gravano

            He has to by law,

            Can you not see what my point is.

            Anyway – must go, Nicola, the new darling of the BBC, on the telly.

          • SableKeech

            Of course I can. Just wondered why you didn’t have the guts to state it outright.

    • sammy gravano

      Labour Party doesn’t have a ‘hard right’.

      It’s got a slightly wetter left.

    • Ultra_Fox

      Pretty sure Ed Miliband was a previous incumbent of that post too.

  • liversedge

    I do wish we wouldn’t rush into this.

    This is the biggest single decision to be made that will determine the outcome of the election in 2020.

    Whether we like it or not leadership ratings are more important than policy and strategy in determining the outcome of a general election.

    Can we just slow down please ?

    • Matthew Blott

      Agree. A conversation about direction is more important at the moment.

  • Doug Smith

    Burnham is the best of the bunch but won’t receive sufficient backing from the Progress-heavy PLP and their supporting LP members.

    • Matthew Blott

      We just had a leader who wasn’t supported by the PLP and wider membership. Look how that turned out.

      • Doug Smith

        You may not like to admit it but it’s the backing of the voters that matters.

        • Matthew Blott

          What?

  • imw101

    Memo to the next Labour Leader: Here’s some free and helpful advice – get
    rid of the career politicians who have never worked in the ‘real
    world’. Look for people and professionals who have business savvy.
    Junk the hypocritical lifestyles (eg flipping your properties while
    denouncing tax dodgers). Set up focus groups comprised of people who
    actually work for a living and run enterprises. They are also ‘hard working people’.
    Stop painting everyone who doesn’t have a car and a house as
    ‘vulnerable and a ‘victim’ of nasty capitalism. Learn to control public spending through efficiencies rather than knee-jerk taxation, Stop demonising people who have succeeded through work and sacrifice. Understand that life
    is not intrinsically fair and that human nature means people are
    basically self-centrerd survivalists. Understand no one will ever
    change that. Stop accusing anyone with a different world view as
    wicked racist, neo-Nazis. Stop
    handing out benefits to people with a brain and functioning limbs.
    Try and resist a “holier than thou” patronising attitude that
    only people with political views left of centre “care” about
    society. Then you just might have a shot at running the country
    again in 10 years’ time.

    • olliebear1516

      Lol, couldn’t have put it better myself. They won’t take your advice, of course, they’ll slink back to the comfort zone of disgruntlement and victimhood once the dust has settled, they’ll carry on with their feigned outrage on Twitter, and they’ll go back to being what they always once were – unelectable. Be sure of it.

    • sammy gravano

      ‘Set up focus groups…’

      ————————————-

      You had me til then.

      This is Labour List right.

      You haven’t wandered on here by mistake have you.

    • Ultra_Fox

      TL:DR Did you copy and paste rhat from the Sun, or the Mail?

  • Chris

    Stella Creasey.

    • Matthew

      Give her some experience in ministerial roles first – after that if she does well I’d definitely vote for her.

      • sammy gravano

        That’s one in the bag, albeit with caveats.

        Just need another 11.3 million or so.

    • Dan

      Really like Stella but she’s very London-y. I feel like Labour needs to reconnect with people outside London. We’ve had a lot of Londoners near the top of the party for a long time and Labour is doing really well in London. What we need now is to repeat that trick elsewhere in the country.

      Stella would be great deputy leader IMHO and should get strong brief in cabinet.

      • Chris

        She is London-y without a doubt!

        It’s a tough one, I think one of the reasons that Labour has lost Scotland and why it lost a lot of votes to UKIP is because it took its strongholds for granted. London is a new stronghold which would need to be defended…

        But then the London focus of the recent leaders is probably another factor in the parties problems so…

  • olliebear1516

    Not one of those people could be considered to be a credible alternative PM. Anyway, I don’t think it really matters, because whoever Labour selects, they’ll be up against Boris Johnson at the next election. I think we all know where Middle England are going to put there ‘X’ in five years time.

  • Ken Burch

    Labour desperately needs at least one genuinely left-wing candidate for the leadership. No meaningful debate on the party’s future will occur, and no possibility for the restoration of grassroots influence and the restoration of internal democracy will exist, if John McDonnell or someone with a similar perspective is not among the candidates.

    • sammy gravano

      ‘Labour desperately needs at least one genuinely left-wing candidate for the leadership’

      ——————————————————————–

      It desperately doesn’t.

      Well it might, but the country desperately doesn’t.

    • Michael Worcester

      Wasn’t that Miliband, kinnock and foot? The definition of insanity is repeating the same action over and over again and expecting a different result

      • Malatesta!

        Miliband and Kinnock were not on the left of the party, they were just to the left of Blair. The New Labour project started under Kinnock with his war on socialists.

        A move right is not going win back SNP or Green voters and a return to Blairism will continue to alienate the northern voters defecting to UKIP.

        McDonnell is probably too left wing to lead the party, but it desperately needs to start listening to people like him.

        • Michael Worcester

          All three were too left wing to be voted into office by the British people. Beyond them to the harder left are a plethora of deposit loosing angry parties. If you wanted real socialism it would be better to start there than keep trying to move the Labour party to yet another dead end. Although most of your energy would be spent decrying other socialist groups and/or their demagogue leaders. I see Scargill is still active why not join him?

          • Malatesta!

            Most of the “hard left” parties you are referring to are authoritarian groups who still subscribe to Bolshevism. They are fighting the battles of the 20th century and on the wrong side.

            There is definitely space for a democratic radical left, as evidenced by the rise of the Greens and the SNP.

            Also the party needs to put the interests of working people first rather than the Apple and latte loving liberal middle classes. It needs to be a bit less Guardian left and a bit more Mirror left.

          • wildcolonialboy

            Ah yes, as evidenced by the Green/SNP getting 4/5% of the vote.

            If you like those parties so much, then bloody vote for them and stop bothering the labour Party

          • Malatesta!

            Did you not just see the SNP gain 56 of 59 seats in Scotland?

            And telling people to go and vote for another party is not going to help Labour win any elections.

      • Ken Burch

        Foot, perhaps(although he was sabotaged by the arrogance of the Gang of Four and Labour’s total incomprehesion of how television works.

        Kinnock spent most of his time as leader driving the left out of the party(including his insane and, as it turned out, utterly indefensible war against Militant-a war that cost Labour control of Liverpool and made the later restoration of Labour rule there meaningless because post-Militant Liverpool Labour governed exactly as the Tories would have, with nothing done at all for the benefit of the workers or the poor, and which resulted in no meaningful gains for Labour in 1997(and too few to matter in 1992).

        Miliband was to the right of Wilson and Callaghan on most issues and the Blairites used Ed Balls to sabotage his chances by pledging Labour to promise only “fewer cuts” rather than no cuts, and by endorsing the Cameron-Osborne-Murdoch narrative on the evils of “deficits”.

        It was that campaign that made it impossible to significantly increase turnout in England. Miliband was only “left-wing” in comparison to General Pinochet.

        • Michael Worcester

          Labour just got thumped in the election with the most left wing candidate that was available. If Labour wants to move the party more to the left it has a choice of either creating a different electorate (which is actually what UKIP are saying Labour has been doing) or be an increasingly irrelevant minor party watching Tories dismantle the state.

          • Ken Burch

            Miliband vowed only to reduce the cuts-a meaningless promise(imposed on him by the Blairites and their now-defeated henchman Ed Balls).

            If he was the most left-wing candidate for the leadership on offer(his programme was almost identical to his brother’s)that’s saying little at all.

            And it wasn’t “left wing” for Miliband to promise never to work with SNP-a promise that destroyed any chance Labour had of victory, since everyone knew Ed had no chance of getting a majority and essentially no chance of getting a plurality of seats. No one affected by the Tory “SNP scare” campaign was ever going to vote anything but Tory or UKIP anyway.

            “Miliband was too left wing” is a delusional statement.

            What was he supposed to do to prove he wasn’t “left wing”? Promise to match Cameron cut-for-cut? Pledge to personally nuke Tehran?
            Have Jeremy Corbyn tarred-and-feathered in Trafalgar Square?

          • wildcolonialboy

            I’m sorry but what you see as left-wing and what reality and ordinary voters see as left-wing are two different things

            It will be political suicide for the Labour Party to chase the 1% or 2% of former Labour voters who went over to the Greens, people like you who mistake their own prejudices for some kind of general view within broader society

          • Ken Burch

            So it’s left wing simply to mention inequality, then? Or simply to say that the deficit shouldn’t be erased solely by cutting the social wage?
            And who appointed you the official spokesman of “reality”?

            If Labour goes back to 100% Blairism(as opposed to the 99% Blairite programme it fought this election on)we both know the party will have no reason to exist. There is no good reason to have TWO parties of greed , austerity, and war. Having that makes elections meaningless.

  • Rob K. Mart

    Dan Jarvis has leadership experience and knowledge of British people across the social spectrum. We need a leader, not a vehicle for the views of a faction. I ask you to consider Dan Jarvis.

    • Chris Morris

      ‘We need a leader, not a vehicle for the views of a faction’
      Spot on.

  • Duncan Hall

    Well this is a depressing conversation. If one side of this discussion gains traction I worry for our party’s survival 🙁

    • bevinboy

      Likewise.
      It tries my patience to explain to those who just cannot and will not understand.

      • sammy gravano

        Understand what?

        You’ve not made yourself very clear.

        (ironically)

  • Mike Green

    It’s time to focus on what we are about, David Miliband is so much a better choice that this list of people. Can we postpone the leadership election until he is back in the UK ? After all the vast majority of the country could not give a hoot at the moment, who leads or who doesn’t lead us , it is small potatoes at the moment. Our energies would be better served by figuring out what the hell we are about, and revising our economic policies to something that will appeal to everyone and keep our socialist philosophy written into the modern world. No one believed our borrowing plans, the mansion tax was laughable without property valuations in place, and we needed to say that of course we cocked up on the spending. We really made a mess withe PFI’s and we need to undo all those arrangements and remove the horrendous costs to Health Trusts up and down the country.

    • Matthew Blott

      David Miliband is not a step forward.

      • g978

        Yes he is. He is a Blairite and they were proven election winners.

        • Michelle

          Any one would have won in 97 against a deeply unpopular Tory government that had been in for 18 years. Not everyone would have lost labour 5 million working class voters while it was on this winning streak. Get another Blair and a huge number of people will stop supporting labour, me included. Please rub the star dust out of your eyes.

      • Dan

        Can you imagine the hilarity if Labour offers the voters another Miliband? It’s a mad idea. The distance between Dave & Ed has been wildly exaggerated.

  • Matthew Blott

    The best piece of advise on the leadership I have heard so far comes unexpectedly from Polly Toynbee in her latest piece here.

    “At the hustings for the next leader, each candidate should pledge to step down if they, too, become a drag anchor, not an asset.”

    • sammy gravano

      Is that the same Polly that accused a panelist on QT of slander because he said she had a house in Tuscany? (which she’d just sold).

      She shouldn’t be calling anyone else a drag anchor

      • Matthew Blott

        No she didn’t accuse anyone of slander. Richard Littlejohn made some comment about her having a home in Tuscany and she said it was cheap.

        • sammy gravano

          … and he said, well you started it, treacle’.

          She did accuse someone of slander and for the reason I gave but not on that edition.

          Apparently in Polly’s tiny brain accusing someone of living in Tuscany is a slander.

        • Jake McQuillan

          What ? In Tuscany ?? I bet the house cost a fortune : )

  • Naomi Fearon

    Tirstram Hunt has not been considered to handle the education brief well at all-most of us can’t stand him. In our union he has the nickname’ Govelite’.

    • Matthew Blott

      I’ve not been following his brief as closely as some but my eyebrows were raised when I read the above appraisal of Hunt as it’s not what I’d heard.

      • Naomi Fearon

        Education has been one of our weakest points. He is very pro-academies (something we should have never had started) , he is pro-performance related pay (a tory policy) , he didn’t argue against the draconion curriculum reforms of Gove , he hasn’t listened well to our concerns at all. A fair few of my colleagues left Labour and went Green because him. He has been a liability if anything. Oh-and often also referred to as ‘Tory Tristram’ on top of ‘Govelite’

        • Matthew Blott

          I don’t have strong opinions either way on a lot of these things, I probably need a bit more information. Gove just seemed to be spoiling for a fight all the time and I’m not very clear what Hunt’s position is on issues.

          • sammy gravano

            To be fair, neither is Tristram.

          • MacGuffin

            Gove was a brilliant Education Secretary for turbocharging the Adonis reforms, and I am looking forward to him p***ing off more of the usual suspects in his new job.

        • Marco

          No, we should support Academies, we should continue the Adonis reforms. The Tory education policy has been better than the Miliband/Hunt policy. Labour’s education policy is too concerned with keeping teaching unions happy and not interested enough in raising standards or putting children first.

          • Matthew Blott

            I’m not sure that’s completely fair but I do think standards aren’t as high as they should be.

          • Marco

            The problem Hunt had is that the Tory education policy was an evolving version of the New Labour policy. Gove stole quite a lot of the Adonis ideas and took them further. There was little left for Labour, except opposing parent power (incl Free Schools) and going on about QTS, despite the fact that the Public schools are full of unqualified teachers and standards are high. QTS is not essential to teach well – the evidence shows that quite clearly. I voted Tory this time partly because they had a clear prospectus for improving school standards by putting power in the hands of parents. Blair understood this stuff. We should re-connect with it.

          • bevinboy

            In the language of business analysis, it puts “producer interests” above “consumer interests”.

            It is why Tesco has faded so badly. and yet Waitrose and Booths (northern privately owned supermarkets) both prosper, even though they are more expensive.

            It is a problem Labour often has, because of historic closeness to the Unions.

          • Marco

            I was trying to avoid using that terminology 😉
            Incidentally, I was struck last week re-watching Yes Prime Minister that the episode on education is basically the Tory education policy in action. It’s uncanny how close it is.

          • sammy gravano

            I take it you didn’t see Waitrose’s results the other day then.

          • bevinboy

            Yes I did, they are all hurting, the sector is very competitive. Tesco and their shareholders are hurting more.

            The problem with the teaching profession is they have historically had a monopoly for most people except the rich. Naturally they fight to preserve their producer monopoly. It is a mistake for Labour to be their ally against the consumer, just to buy a few votes from the profession.

          • sammy gravano

            ‘The problem with the teaching profession is they have historically had a monopoly for most people except the rich. ‘
            ————————————————————–

            understood all the words there but not your meaning.

            I think that makes it your fault.

            (italics just to show I know how to do it)

          • sammy gravano

            hear hear.

            Tory party thatway >>>>>>>>>

          • Jimmy Sands

            A long long way to the right?

        • g978

          Naomi – Hunt may have done well then if he was not just supporting the producer view. Labour cannot just be a party for the producers in the NHS and Education. They should be there for the patients and students. Your wants are not necessarily what is good for the students. Pay for performance is a great example, you want more pay but not on how you actually teach. Students want better teaching.

        • sammy gravano

          ‘he is pro-performance related pay (a tory policy)’

          ——————————————————-

          Yeah, fancy getting paid more than one of your colleagues who’s bone idle and doesn’t give a t*ss.

        • Jimmy Sands

          Just so I’m clear, rewarding good teachers is a bad thing because….?

        • Rob K. Mart

          Performance related pay is simply stupid.

        • MacGuffin

          How very dare good teachers expect to be rewarded more than rubbish ones??? How very dare they!

      • Jake McQuillan

        No ones going to vote for someone called Tristram ffs

  • Jane Manby

    Hunt crossed a union picket line at the university he teaches at with the excuse he was not in that union, and get this is was to teach on Marx, Engels and Marxism, solidarity with the workers eh

    • bikerboy

      It’s what he was teaching that’s my worry

      😉

      • sammy gravano

        Is he for or against free schools this week, I forget.

  • sammy gravano

    Andy Burnham

    • Jimmy Sands

      Thank you for collating all the relevant right wing flatulent talking points so that we can handily ignore them in a single place.

      • sammy gravano

        My pleasure.

        Happy to help.

        If you’d asked me five years ago I could have helped you out with Siliband as well.

        • Jimmy Sands

          I can assure you I managed to work that one out all by myself.

  • returner

    Good discussion.

    I agree it would be suicidal to go with Burnham. Too much baggage — Mid Staffs muddies the water.

    re; Dan Jarvis, I can see how his life story makes him a compelling candidate, but I doubt it makes him attack-proof. A concerted five-year effort by the right wing press will no doubt conjure up something about why middle england shouldn’t vote for him. (The Militant Major, or whatever).

    I hope the next leader is someone very comfortable doing the rounds of breakfast tv sofas, etc, as Cameron is. Signs of humanity (rather than just robo-message-speak) a bonus.

    I’m a returning Labour voter, ex-Green. Liked Ed, but can understand why he didn’t connect.

  • Sam

    For me it’s got to be Chuka Ummuna. 2010 in-take so a fresh break from the past. Can command the support from the left and right of the party. He would inject the energy and dynamism the Labour Party needs to be an effective opposition. He can handle the media and will have wide public appeal. Ideologically he is a progressive who understands the need to tackle inequality and supports aspiration.

    • Dan

      Very london though. In fact hard to be more London than Chuka. Hard to believe he will convince Welsh and Northern regions that he cares about them. I think he’s great for talking to the City, but not so great for talking to Labour voters.

    • Malatesta!

      There are too many racist people in this country for a man called Chuka Umunna to become prime minister.

      He’s the ultimate vote losing candidate in that he’s posh and metropolitan enough to send more working class voters to UKIP, right wing enough to alienate the left and foreign enough to work up the Mail/Express.

    • MacGuffin

      On Friday afternoon, I happened to be having a chat with a person who confided that she had voted Conservative for the first time in her life, just in order to vote against Umunna. She said she couldn’t stand the sight of his punchable face and his mincing around.

  • Chris Morris

    1. Are we electing a leader of the Labour Party we all feel comfortable with or a future election-winning Prime Minister the electorate will vote for ?
    2 When Manchester United appointed Alex Ferguson it is said that the son of Paddy Crerand asked his dad why the club had appointed such a nasty man. Dad said – we haven’t won the title for twenty five years – what do you want, a nice man, or a bastard who wins?
    3. Discuss

    • greenwich

      From the tone of your comment I guess your answer to question 1 is “the latter”. If so, then Labour can cut this process short and just appoint Boris Johnson as the new leader.

    • liversedge

      Another Blair ?

      • Chris Morris

        I’m no apologist for Blair, but if, right now, in some alternate reality, you could replace this Tory government for a Labour one but only if Blair is leader, what do you do ?
        Should we think not just about who we most want to lead our party but who the country will elect ? Any of our candidates is better than any Tory, but some are more likely to win an election than others – so pick the one with the best chance of getting Labour back in power.

        • liversedge

          I’d take Blair in an instant of course!

      • Michael Worcester

        He won elections

        • liversedge

          Absolutely !

        • Ultra_Fox

          So did Richard Nixon. And Ronald Reagan. And George W. Bush.

  • treeblopez

    None of these stand out. It needs to be someone who can generate some energy and interest. It also needs to be someone who can appeal to English voters outside London and the North (rules out Chuka and Burnham?). Stella Creasy – she’s a clever, effective campaigner and much less robotic than most of the names above. A northerner from Essex and a woman – all helpful. Wonga/EDL proves her mettle. We need someone who can enthuse people. We need someone who doesn’t look like a typical Labour leader – someone who can appeal to people who aren’t obvious Labour voters.

    • Chris Morris

      I like your analysis. Can I add, think of what the job actually entails, for example (not by any means the most important), PMQs. Cameron and his chorus of bully boys are going to be difficult. Would he be able to treat a woman the way he treated Ed ? Work through some other examples, and see if this a consideration in choosing the best candidate ? Jose Mourinho picks the right team to beat the opposition (though sadly we can’t rotate our leader. Unless a jobshare is an option,,,,

      • treeblopez

        Cameron has a problem with women – as many public-school boys do. And we know female leaders performed well and were popular in this election. Yvette Cooper is capable but she doesn’t inspire warmth. It’s astonishing that Rachel Reeves and Liza Kendall are on this list at all (Labour is not the party of people on benefits, anyone?). Labour needs someone who isn’t painfully dull on television. And besides being clever and sensible, it should be someone with a personality. There are *very* few among the leading contenders who you can imagine wanting to meet in a pub. Dan Jarvis? Who else?

  • Chris Morris

    I am no apologist for Blair, but if, right now, in some alternate reality, you could replace this Tory government for a Labour one but only if Blair is leader, what do you do ?
    Should we think not just about who we most want to lead our party but who the country will elect ? Any of our candidates is better than any Tory, but some are more likely to win an election than others – so pick the one with the best chance of getting Labour back in power.

  • Michelle

    Reading the standard just now and their advise to labour is for them to modernise, not talk about inequality, housing, the nhs etc. This is code for, if you want our support get yourself a blairite leader. Yuk!

  • Michael Worcester

    If you look at the past Brillo interviews only Mary didn’t end up looking like a bumbling idiot or slippery

  • Michelle

    Ed was a leader who, despite his monstering by the media, inspired a lot of people. We all knew it was going to be an uphill battle to win after the terrible defeat in 2010, and that was before we knew there’d be a rise in nationalism north and south of the border. I’ve just checked out Eds Facebook page and the comments are genuinely moving. I hope the next leader inspires such sentiment.

    Pud Edward I only joined the Labour Party to vote for you as leader. Beyond gutted you’ve gone. Think you should have stayed on. Really worried who labour choose next. Whoever it is they won’t be a patch on you.
    Like · Reply · 33 mins

    Nicole Adey Thankyou Ed for restoring faith in politics for young people like me. You are an inspirational figure and it is sad to see you step down.
    Like · Reply · 2,081 · Yesterday at 2:05pm
    65 Replies · 3 hrs

    Elijah Handley Did the best you could Ed. Unfortunately so many of the British people just believe everything they read in the tabloids. Labour is the best party for the majority, but as long as Cameron has Rupert Murdoch on his side the Conservatives will stay in charge and continue running our country into the ground. Never give up on Labour!
    Like · Reply · 1,177 · Yesterday at 2:06pm
    36 Replies · 7 hrs

    Jo Stock You’re a good man Ed Miliband. Keep the faith.
    Like · Reply · 354 · Yesterday at 2:06pm
    12 Replies · 2 hrs

    Ashley Thomas Roberts Sorry to see you go tbh you would of been a good pm
    Like · Reply · 327 · Yesterday at 2:04pm
    6 Replies · 6 hrs

    Thomas Hingston Solidarity Ed – Cant see how this was your fault.
    Like · Reply · 881 · Yesterday at 2:04pm
    13 Replies

    Mo Hitchcock I wish you would stay Ed. We need you more than ever. My fellow Scots have something strange going on – nationalism and it is ugly Ed. I am so ashamed to be Scottish right now, so heartbroken but I will never be ashamed to be Labour and I know you would have been a great PM. Thank you for giving a damn.
    Like · Reply · 243 · Yesterday at 2:07pm
    14 Replies · 4 hrs

    Tom Halligan I’d vote for Ed again, this was a total failure of the left and people saw who Miliband really is far, far too late in the game. Drop the ‘politician’ act Ed – you do much, much better when you are just being yourself.
    Like · Reply · 194 · Yesterday at 2:05pm
    8 Replies · 4 hrs

    Katie Ward Solidarity forever. On the back of my Labour Party membership card it says: United we Stand, Divided we fall. We need to stand together now more than ever.
    Like · Reply · 190 · Yesterday at 2:07pm
    5 Replies

    Kerrin Mawdsley-dillon Reading this brought tears to my eyes (1st time ANY MP has moved me), you never had the chance and were slated for personal reasons rather than political. Shows the unkindness of people, wishing you all the best x x
    Like · Reply · 502 · Yesterday at 2:09pm
    7 Replies

    Rachael Holt You spoke up for the vulnerable, those facing poverty and relying on food banks, the NHS staff working tirelessly in the face of privatisation, pay cuts and under staffing. We need voices like that.
    Unlike · Reply · 141 · Yesterday at 2:12pm
    5 Replies · 8 hrs

    Corinna Louise Lovegrove Ed Milliband – the best Prime Minister we’ve never had.
    Like · Reply · 126 · Yesterday at 2:11pm
    8 Replies

    Kevin Brook I don’t really see how ed is responsible for the idiocy of the British public…..
    Like · Reply · 119 · Yesterday at 2:15pm
    7 Replies

    Anita Collette Smith Very sorry Labour didn’t get in – I fear greatly for our country now.
    Like · Reply · 335 · Yesterday at 2:09pm
    19 Replies

    Christine Williams I’m literally gobsmacked and disheartened that we don’t have Labor in charge. I can’t believe people would vote to have Tories run this country into the ground, I am frightened for this country’s and my families future
    Like · Reply · 99 · Yesterday at 2:14pm
    6 Replies · 6 hrs

    Charlotte Jones The fight doesn’t end here
    Like · Reply · 92 · Yesterday at 2:05pm

    Carol Ashley Jones You’ve done us proud Ed, Just wish you’d have stayed and fought back even more! A true gentleman with compassion for others. Good luck, hope you continue to work with Labour…. From a Milifan
    Like · Reply · 82 · Yesterday at 2:07pm

    Josie Gotch We will miss you Ed, you have been an amazing and inspiring leader for the Labour Party. You are not responsible for this outcome, the people of this country are. Good luck in all you do. I will always #VoteLabour
    Like · Reply · 81 · Yesterday at 2:06pm
    2 Replies

    Jennifer Evans Best man never to be PM.. All because ppl believed David Cameron’s scare rubbish..
    Like · Reply · 75 · Yesterday at 2:08pm

    John Coates Tony Blair is to blame. He destroyed the solidarity within the Labour movement and has dissillusioned so many ex-staunch Labour voters – myself included. I voted Lib/Dem in 2010 and Green in 2015. We need to get back to the roots or die. Tony Benn, Michael Foot etc were the true Labour heroes within my lifetime.
    Like · Reply · 69 · Yesterday at 2:08pm
    9 Replies

    Bobby Ikari Monckton You’ll be missed Ed. You’re an honest politician, and that’s hard to come by these days…
    Like · Reply · 59 · Yesterday at 2:07pm

    Bobby Presley You put up a good fight Ed. Now here’s five years of rebuilding getting stronger and make a better fight to stop the Tories.
    Like · Reply · 53 · Yesterday at 2:05pm
    2 Replies

    Mohd Nurhakim Salleh Good Luck Ed , from Malaysia!
    Unlike · Reply · 54 · Yesterday at 2:04pm

    Elliot Mair You challenged Murdoch , the big energy companies and the rich. For that i respect you. Thanks Ed
    Unlike · Reply · 52 · Yesterday at 2:11pm

    John Lyle Some would say thats why he didn’t win..
    Unlike · 1 · 9 hrs
    Pud Edward

    Write a reply…

    Lynn Johnson I think you have had a very raw deal. I stand by you and always by the Labour party. Good luck xxx
    Like · Reply · 50 · Yesterday at 2:05pm

    Nicola Bate-Roden I am devastated but remember Ed, you did us proud. Keep up the good work.
    Unlike · Reply · 49 · Yesterday at 2:07pm

    Sophie Townend I believe you’ve captured a new generation in to the interest of politics, and you’ve been fantastic in the campaign. I’m absolutely gutted and hope you remain leader. Thank you for running such a personally driven, dignified and honest campaign. I sti…See More
    Unlike · Reply · 41 · Yesterday at 2:14pm
    2 Replies

    Stephanie Desborough Totally behind you, Ed. Sorry the rest of the country are either smug self-serving tossers or idiots.
    Unlike · Reply · 36 · Yesterday at 2:14pm
    9 Replies · 2 hrs

    Paul Ryan WTF? 17 million votes against the conservative government and they still get in with 11.1?

    Even if the Con + Lib Den joined forces again they would have just 13.5 with 15.3 against….See More
    Like · Reply · 30 · Yesterday at 2:15pm
    1 Reply

    A Gary Twigg Ed, you are a dignified, intelligent and caring person who would have made a great PM. It’s all about image in this country now unfortunately. Wish you all the best for the future
    Like · Reply · 30 · Yesterday at 2:12pm

    Peter Baldrey Thanks Ed. I am proud to have stood as a parliamentary candidate under your leadership. I admire your integrity and determination to make Britain a better place for the many. Best wishes to you and your family for the future.
    Like · Reply · 23 · Yesterday at 2:14pm

    Dani Grave We’re right behind you! Fighting alongside you for a country that we believe in!
    Like · Reply · 46 · Yesterday at 2:05pm

    Susie Morris You did your best. You can’t win against propaganda and lies in the press. I always felt you were genuine and cared about ordinary people. Sadly too many people in this country have a ‘me first’ attitude.
    Like · Reply · 20 · Yesterday at 2:22pm
    1 Reply

    Valerie Anderson You didn’t stand a chance against Murdoch, Ed. We need leaders with integrity like you. Really sad to see you go.
    Like · Reply · 20 · Yesterday at 2:12pm
    4 Replies · 1 hr

    Leigh Jackaman Such a shame, you would have made my life a whole lot better and now all I have to look forward to is more cuts, and Tory ideals that harm the low paid and sick and give the rich more power and money – this election was disgraceful and you should have …See More
    Like · Reply · 20 · Yesterday at 2:12pm

    Heather Atkins Ed, I work in the public sector and I fear for its future. I can’t understand the election result. Why have people voted for 5 more years of the Tories? You have my comisserations and I wish you good luck for the future. X
    Like · Reply · 19 · Yesterday at 2:32pm
    1 Reply

    Olivia Mayer I was right behind you and believe in your vision still now. I am devastated
    Like · Reply · 19 · Yesterday at 2:07pm

    Clara Popp ed miliband never deserved this, labour never deserved this and our country certainly doesnt deserve being ruined by the torys but that’s what will happen. what a shame.
    Like · Reply · 20 · Yesterday at 2:06pm

    Lauren Burn Truly devastated as a first time voter you really inspired me and sparked an interest for politics in me which I never thought would happen youve inspired me to always stand up for whats right and ill forever be beside you in this fight for a Britain w…See More
    Like · Reply · 18 · Yesterday at 2:17pm

    Angie Stack Ed I am so proud of you. People. Britain will never know now what a Great Prime Minister you would have been. Lots of love to you and your family xx
    Like · Reply · 16 · Yesterday at 2:22pm

    • Matthew Blott

      I’d rather a leader who inspired people to vote for them than one who inspires lots of Facebook likes.

      • Michelle

        I wish David had won. Then when he was defeated, as he would undoubtedly have been, this talk about the winning formula would have been put to bed once and for all.

        • Matthew Blott

          He might have lost. Or he might not have. We will never know for sure. I didn’t think he was great but I think he might have saved 20 to 30 seats.

          • Michelle

            Or lost them.

          • Michelle

            Which means he would have lost, and then this ridiculously naive notion that only someone like Blair can win elections, would have died off. Then ed could have stood in 2020 when people were more peed off with this shower we have in now, and won. I’m starting to think timing is everything.

          • Matthew Blott

            Michelle you inhabit a world I don’t think I can ever understand.

          • Michelle

            I’ll take that as a compliment 😉

      • Michelle

        This was a very difficult election for labour to win. What worries me is the thought any leader who threatens the status quo like ed undoubtedly did, will get the same treatment from press he did. I don’t want the press to choose our leaders.

        • Ian

          This should have been an easy election to win. An unpopular PM at the head of a deeply divided coalition government who had put the country through the most severe austerity in living memory. What better could you ask for?

  • Grouchy Oldgit

    Lots of people will suffer from 5 more Tory years. The priority must be a leader who can win and that must be Dan Jarvis. He’s untainted from the Blair Brown years, warmongering and recession. And even the wholly hostile Tory media will not be able to make the vile personal attacks that Ed faced seemingly daily.

    • sammy gravano

      A Para who’s ‘untainted by warmongering’.

      You do know what a Para is, right?

      • Grouchy Oldgit

        Unlike careerist desk jockeys I would hope and expect that having seen the horrors of war up close he would only commit to military action as an absolute last resort.

  • Jake McQuillan

    Sarah Champion …you heard it here first …

    • MacGuffin

      And last.

  • Jake McQuillan

    Why dont you just get a human being that relates to other people ? Not the fakes and murderers youve listed above …
    Sarah Champion … you heard it here first …

    • MacGuffin

      If that’s a joke, it’s funny. If it’s not a joke, it’s even funnier.

      Sarah Champion – defending the rights of muslim rapists everywhere.

      • Ultra_Fox

        Serious accusation – care to provide some evidence for that?

  • Malatesta!

    Labour have spent 20 years alienating the left wing voters of this country and Miliband didn’t offer anything to floating centrist voters. Can we at least have a leader who will make sure the party represents ordinary working people.

    The party needs to re-establish itself as a party of peace. Iraq was a disaster, as was supporting air strikes on Syria.

    It needs to ensure there are more affordable homes, to buy and to rent. It needs to build more social housing and stop rents in the south from spiralling out of control.

    It needs to address voters concerns with globalisation. Working class voters, the core vote, in the Labour heartlands, are defecting to UKIP. Labour needs to ensure their are more and better jobs in the North, it never did anything to solve the problem of de-industrialisation.

    It needs to support free education and abolish tuition fees.

    It shouldn’t be afraid of nationalisation, and it needs to remember that it is linked to the Co-operative party and start promoting more workers co-operatives as opposed to exploitative businesses.

    • MacGuffin

      Yes, workers coooperatives work soooooooooo well, don’t they. Remind me how the Cooperative Bank fared?

      • Malatesta!

        Waitrose/John Lewis seems to be doing okay.

        Housing co-operatives across the country are giving people affordable rents without parasitic landlords.

        And despite the name the co-operative bank was not a workers co-operative.

        What’s your alternative? State socialism?

        • MacGuffin

          There is no one alternative; it depends on the particular situation and industry. However, I would say well-regulated free enterprise tends to deliver the best results in most cases (please note I said ‘well regulated’, not ‘heavily regulated’ or ‘lightly regulated’).

          • Malatesta!

            Free enterprise, no matter how “well regulated” means leaving the power of the capitalist class intact. One needs to abolish their power as much as possible or they will always regroup for further attacks on the proletariat.

          • sammy gravano

            This is a spoof post, right.

          • Malatesta!

            Why do you think it has to be a spoof? Is having political beliefs and convictions rather than abandoning left wing ideals in the name of “pragmatism” unbelievable?

            There is no point in Labour maintaining the status quo whilst in office then watching in horror as the Tories tear society apart.

            The Conservatives always go on the attack when in office, it’s time Labour did too.

          • sammy gravano

            Tories tearing society apart.

            I suppose those were Tory thugs down Whitehall the other day ‘tearing society apart’.

          • MacGuffin

            Good Lord. You sound like you grew up in the Miliband household.

          • Malatesta!

            Très amusant. Carry on making baseless ad hominem attacks instead of engaging with my argument and carry on advocating for the Labour to be a bourgeois right wing capitalist party instead of authentically representing the working classes.

      • trotters1957

        Remind me how well did RBS, Nat west, Northern Rock do. And the others would have gone down without the bailout like a pack of cards. Then they took £350bn in QE.
        The Co-op Bank hasn’t taken a penny of tax payers money

        • swatnan

          Well said!

  • MacGuffin

    Russell Brand. I mean, he’s such a surefire votewinner, and the Labour Party has become a joke.

    • Ian

      Not Eddie Izzard then?

  • Michelle

    I’ve read so many people saying we need a Blair. Blair won elections. But can we at least put these victories into context. Blair won a landslide in 97 against a deeply unpopular Tory government who had been in for almost two decades. Over the next two elections his majority shrunk as more and more working class voters abandoned the party. Ed was trying to win after just five years out of power after the second worse defeat in labours history and with Scottish and English nationalism on the rise. Personally I think Ed did well to increase labours share of the vote under these circumstances.

  • Ken Burch

    Labour should abolish the rule that only an MP can be chosen leader. And should restore every degree of internal democracy that was abolished by Kinnock and Blair. Only new voices from outside and below can provide the creative thinking the party desperately needs.

    Labour should also give full support to the People’s Assembly.

  • Grumpy_Col

    I hope Dan Jarvis stands.

    If a Nottingham Forest fan (Jarvis) can rely on the support of a Derby County fan (me) then uniting the anti Tory electorare should be a bloody doddle!

  • Michael Worcester

    I am surprised Emma Reynolds isn’t mentioned, she did a good job defending what was an ill thought out reactionary and often chaotic housing policy with passion. I also think Mary Creagh and Dan Jarvis managed well. As to the rest they were Brillo’d, so wouldn’t survive PMQ’s and have baggage and looser written all over them.

  • MK50

    The thought of five years of canvassing and campaigning under a Burnham, Umunna or Copper banner doesn’t energise me much. And they’d all have the Tories rubbing their hands.

    I need to hear a lot more of Dan Jarvis, and I’m writing on a hunch, but right now he feels like the only guy that could make me hopeful about taking on the Tories in the marginals and UKIP everywhere they’re piling up Labour votes.

  • John Davies

    Top question – who’s most electable? It’s the art of the possible, not the art of the ideal.

    • liversedge

      Jarvis

  • John Davies

    To elect a leader before resolving new approaches and policies would put cart before horse. I’d ask Ms Harman to stay on as caretaker for maybe a year so that the nature of renewed Labour is agreed before electing a replacement.

    • MacGuffin

      Get Harman off the tv screens as quickly as possible.

  • Jack

    Blairites saying forget about the Tories’ attacks on the NHS, they don’t really mean to privatise it, casts doubt on their motives and observational abilities. The NHS IS being privatised before their eyes yet they refuse to admit it, it’s one of the reasons the Tories exist. As Tory minister Oliver Letwin said, the NHS will no longer exist with the Tories. If the Blairites can’t see that the responsibility to oversee the NHS was removed from the Health Secretary and that the Health and Social Care Act was introduced precisely to allow NHS privatisation then they are wilfully blind.

    With so called Labour supporters like these, who needs Tories?

    • sammy gravano

      So what’s wrong with my gardener cutting the lawns of my local NHS hospital

      He’s even got his own lawn mower.

      Oh I forgot that’s *gasp* *shriek* privatisation.

  • John Davies

    Look again at Stella Creasy.

  • John Davies

    Labour should put off electing a new leader until they have sorted out new approaches and policies. Keep Harriet Harman as caretaker for six months, a year, as long as it takes. Then consider some great female candidates as well as Yvette Cooper that are being unjustly overlooked – Stella Creasy, Mary Creagh, Caroline Flint, Rachel Reeves.

    • MacGuffin

      The last thing the Labour Party needs is to keep Harriet Harman on tv screens for a year.

  • wildcolonialboy

    Dan Jarvis, no question

    • sammy gravano

      Dan’s questioned it.

      never mind.

      There’s always Rachel Reeves.

  • Ian

    Hunt said on Election Night that he felt Labour had run a good campaign. The guy’s an imbecile.

x

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