You know what you have to do Vince…

May 23, 2012 9:09 am

Tory Donor Beecroft says of Vince Cable:

“I think he is a socialist who found a home in the Lib Dems”

You know what you have to do Vince…

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  • treborc1

    Do you not think this is a case of Cable being out of the media long enough, he’s fighting back, because I suspect calling Cable a socialist is really stretching the imagination, not to long ago everyone was calling him something else on here, and it was not socialist.

    My daughter is working in Tesco she has a two year contract which is renewed or not renewed it’s a way of keeping your workers happy, if you do something wrong your gone, but you have to have done two years already on a one year contract.

    Asda offers all the disabled a one year contract, this means if you have a down turn or somethings not working well you just do not renew the contracts and after twelve months your done.

    Always ways of getting rid of workers you do not want, if they are lazy my emp0loyers use to turn the CCTV on them, they be  gone in a week, it’s hard to work if you know the camera is on you all day.

    They also had a Union chap who was the time and motion, he would stand by you with his stop watch you knew it was time to move on.

    So in the end this is the Tories trying to prove they are on the side of business, it would be far better mind you if they had a bit of growth going in the economy this might well make people think more about employing then making redundancies.

  • Loxxie

    Beecroft is an idiot. Even John “The Vulcan” Redwood disagrees with a lot in his report and Redwood ain’t no socialist.

    • Brumanuensis

      Although that said, when I saw Redwood on Newsnight last month discussing employment regulations, he was very coy about which ones he’d get rid of instead.   

  • Mark

    “No fault dismissal.”

    An abusers charter. Anybody who stands up for themselves or stands out in any way could be dismissed out of hand. For example a man who witnesses his boss sexually harassing a female colleague, stops him and warns him off could be sacked on the spot by the abusive employer; or a whistle-blower growing anxious about health and safety who criticises his/her employer could get the boot because he/she made some embarrassing waves; or somebody who had been ill for a week could be dismissed because of that absence without explanation; or somebody refusing to work a huge amount of overtime could be out on their ear even though they were acting completely within their legal rights.

    The sole purpose of this proposal is to render the workforce acquiescent through fear.

    No surprise that Beecroft is a dyed-in-the-wool Tory then.

    • Jeremy_Preece

      Yep Mark, that is pretty much it.

      I was thinking that it was like the 1980′s and Lord Young saying that “unemployment is a price well worth paying in the battle against inflation”.

      But there again, it is very much like the Victorian ideas of employment during the industrial revolution. There really is a nasty and timeless quality about the Tories.

      Problem with inflation? Make working people unemployed and force wages down.
      Deficit? Squeeze the litle people, the workers and the middle, especailly public sector.
      Economic slow down? Cat tax for the very rich and squeeze the rest.
      Not enough revenue? Go easy on the large corporations who get out of billions in corporation tax and give unemployed and single mothers a good kicking.

      Beecroft is just the best illustration of just what is so wrong with the Tories.  

    • Mike Murray

      Absolutely.   Could you imagine the stink it would have caused  if a prominent Trade Unionist  appointed by Labour had  produced a report which recommended increasing trade union rights? 

  • Dave Postles

    I can’t stop laughing.  Cable is seemingly all talk.  I suspect that he will prevaricate, procrastinate, but remain in the cabinet.  The first point is this: his department has been circumvented again.  It’s a resigning matter, a matter of honour.  The second point is this: it indicates how pernicious are the Tories.  Did they consult with representatives of SMEs engaged in manufacturing?  No.  They went to a venture capitalist – a single person.  What do venture capitalists know about employment?  Nothing.  They simply extract.  So, did Osborne campaign with Hilton/Cameron for a representative of the ‘march of the makers’?  It doesn’t seem so.  They went back to financial services.  Appalling.  The other comments below are absolutely right about fear and aggregate demand. 

    • treborc1

      The best one is though Clegg saying he’s looking at spending  as the way of getting out of trouble, I nearly chocked on my carrots.

      Danny Alexander is the best though, if he does not get his own chat show one day I’d be very surprised, he so funny

  • Brumanuensis

    Rich Tory-donor expresses annoyance that crackpot ‘proposals’  are greeted with ridicule by people who actually know what they ‘re talking about.

    I’m shocked, shocked I tell you.  

    I love the fact that Adrian Beecroft is whining about Cable being opposed for ‘ideological rather than economic reasons’. This is the same Adrian Beecroft, by the way, who has no formal qualifications in economics. Vince Cable, on the other hand, a man who worked for most of his pre-politics career as an economist, is apparently just an uninformed ideologue. Sure. I can buy that. 

    It’s also worth drawing attention to something that Beecroft states in his ‘report’:

    “Quantifying the loss of jobs arising from the burden of regulation, and the economic value of those jobs, is an impossible task. How many more businesses would there be, how many people would they employ, how many more people would existing businesses employ, how profitable would all these businesses be? Who knows? But there is a growing feeling that, for the small business sector, the price is not worth paying”.

    ‘A growing feeling’. Oh how scientific. Not at all ‘ideological’ of course. I would also like to point out that at no point in his ‘report’ does Beecroft offer a single footnote, nor is there a bibliography of sources referred to, nor indeed are there any links to surveys or formal records of registered opinions – instead there are contant nebulous references to ‘employers’. Which employers?    

    Some gems from the Telegraph interview: 

    “One of the defences the Lib Dems put up is that our environment is better than the rest of Europe and therefore if people are coming to Europe they are still attracted to the UK. 

    “But people don’t have to come to Europe and particularly mobile entrepreneurs, I’m talking about the hi-tech sort, will tend to want to go to America or Singapore or wherever they want. So saying that we’re better than the rest of Europe is like saying we can beat Italy at cricket. It’s not really terribly helpful.”

    Well gosh. I suppose we could copy Chinese labour regulations. I hear the mining industry in the Democratic Republic of Congo is a model of flexible labour standards. After all, we’ve got to ‘compete’ with more ‘flexible’ jurisdictions haven’t we? 

    Less sarcastically, Beecroft is seemingly ignorant of the fact that according to the World Bank’s ‘Doing Business’ survey (2012), the UK ranks 7th out of 183 countries. The countries ahead of us? Er, Singapore, Hong Kong, New Zealand, the United States, Denmark and Norway. Three of those countries – Denmark, New Zealand and Norway – have higher employment protection ratings than the UK. In the OECD, the UK ranks 3 of 21 in terms of employment protection, after Canada and the US. So Beecroft is talking rubbish.

    “One of the things that surprised me, when it probably shouldn’t … people didn’t seem to just say, ‘Well, we think these are bad suggestions,’ they also said the person who made them must be a bad person,” he says. Whereas I don’t actually think that people who hold the opposite view are bad people, I think they’re wrong. Maybe I was naive, before I started I hadn’t realised that it was such a political hot potato.” 

    So Beecroft had no idea that his suggestion that employers ought to be able to fire people without giving a reason would go down badly? Smart cookie this one. 

    “Mr Beecroft seems resigned to the Coalition frustrating his recommendations, despite the warnings that up to five per cent could be wiped off gross domestic product as a result. Unbeknown to many, he has also advised the Conservatives on reforming the Department of Health and still does not rule out doing further work on employment law reform”.

    God help us all.

    • Dave Postles

      ”God help us all.’
      You’ll have to wait until he is Guv’nor of the BoE, I’m afraid.  Merv the Swerv is King pro tempore.

      • Brumanuensis

        Well played Dave. 

  • Dave Postles

    How did Cable vote on Chris Leslie’s amendment to promote co-operatives?

    ”Yesterday I moved Amendment 72 of the Financial Services Bill on the
    floor of the House of Commons. Last night, Conservative and Liberal
    Democract MPs followed the Government whips to vote our plan down and
    reject my amendment’
    (Chris Leslie)
     

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