A day in the life of Ed Miliband

April 24, 2012 10:34 pm

Ed Miliband got the “a day in the life” treatment from Nick Robinson today – you can see how that worked out below:

  • Brumanuensis

    Let’s analyse this video.

    Ed begins, as customary, by saying ‘look’. This is not good. It sounds pushy, defensive and he says it so often, it’s practically a verbal tic. This if followed by 45 seconds of pure political boilerplate. Cameron does this too, but he sounds natural. Ed sounds over-rehearsed. Even his expressions seem practiced, so it all comes out as ‘now I’m going to sound concerned; now I’m going to sound perplexed; now I’m going to sound emphatic’. And so on. 

    He also has an infuriating habit of speaking in bullet-points. He did this for his entire conference speech and it’s exhausting to listen to. When he stops doing it, he sounds much less forced and a lot more engaging. But some lack of confidence means he keeps lapsing into a  ‘de-dum, de-dum, de-dum rhythtm’, almost as if his speeches had been written in iambic pentameter. 

    The cereal packet question is an annoying trick interviewers like to pull, but nonetheless, an answer that lasts about 20 seconds is not ‘short’. ‘Short’, in this context, is 5 – 10 seconds. Someone needs to sit down and give Ed a more succinct line to use, because by the end of his answer, I’d almost forgotten how it started.

    These are his problems in a nutshell. Ed prevaricates. He needs to learn that ‘less is more’ when answering a question, and try and cut out the over-theatrical speaking style. Developing a backbone and properly resisting the government’s idiotic policies on housing and disability ‘reform’ wouldn’t hurt either.

  • Brumanuensis

    Let’s analyse this video.

    Ed begins, as customary, by saying ‘look’. This is not good. It sounds pushy, defensive and he says it so often, it’s practically a verbal tic. This if followed by 45 seconds of pure political boilerplate. Cameron does this too, but he sounds natural. Ed sounds over-rehearsed. Even his expressions seem practiced, so it all comes out as ‘now I’m going to sound concerned; now I’m going to sound perplexed; now I’m going to sound emphatic’. And so on. 

    He also has an infuriating habit of speaking in bullet-points. He did this for his entire conference speech and it’s exhausting to listen to. When he stops doing it, he sounds much less forced and a lot more engaging. But some lack of confidence means he keeps lapsing into a  ‘de-dum, de-dum, de-dum rhythtm’, almost as if his speeches had been written in iambic pentameter. 

    The cereal packet question is an annoying trick interviewers like to pull, but nonetheless, an answer that lasts about 20 seconds is not ‘short’. ‘Short’, in this context, is 5 – 10 seconds. Someone needs to sit down and give Ed a more succinct line to use, because by the end of his answer, I’d almost forgotten how it started.

    These are his problems in a nutshell. Ed prevaricates. He needs to learn that ‘less is more’ when answering a question, and try and cut out the over-theatrical speaking style. Developing a backbone and properly resisting the government’s idiotic policies on housing and disability ‘reform’ wouldn’t hurt either.

    • treborc1

      The biggest problem is he does not look or sound like a leader in waiting, his whole attitude is one of I’ve no idea what to do so I will say little in the hope the people will think I’m a middle of the road politician, so why say anything which proves I have nothing to offer.

      One minutes he sounds like he’s socialist, he might be a leader who will be labour, ten second later he sounds like his brother

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