Ed’s Deputy Chief of Staff Lucy Powell steps down

24th April, 2012 11:21 am

After being selected as Labour’s candidate for the upcoming Manchester Central by-election last week, Ed Miliband’s Deputy Chief of Staff Lucy Powell has today stood down from her role, and from the party’s Executive Board.

A Labour source told LabourList this morning that Powell had taken the decision herself in order to focus on her campaign in Manchester, where she will be seeking to retain the large Labour majority left by outgoing MP (and PLP chair) Tony Lloyd.

As yet there has been no indication as to whether Miliband will hire a replacement Deputy Chief of Staff, or whether the role (created for Powell) will be abolished, but this is one of a number of significant changes at the top of the party in recent weeks, following the appointment of Tim Livesay as Chief of Staff, the move to the new HQ at Brewer’s Green and the appointment of the 7 Executive Directors.

Recent interviews with Miliband have stressed the need for further change within the party – especially with regard to the party being “rooted in community” as he told Prospect this morning. With that in mind, we  can expect to see further changes announced in the coming weeks and months.

Latest

  • Featured News Weekly survey: Budget surplus, Syria and Heathrow expansion

    Weekly survey: Budget surplus, Syria and Heathrow expansion

    The Labour leadership team seem to have agreed with George Osborne’s proposals that the government should run a budget surplus in “normal times”. Over the weekend Chris Leslie, Shadow Chancellor, said that signing up to these proposals was important for Labour to gain economic credibility. However, it’s unlikely everyone in the party will agree, particularly as 77 academics have argued this ignores “basic economics”. What do you think? Is it right for Labour to aim to run a budget surplus in […]

    Read more →
  • Featured News Labour leadership candidates answer readers’ questions on education

    Labour leadership candidates answer readers’ questions on education

    LabourList readers can submit weekly questions on a different topic to the Labour leadership candidates. Here are the answers we got back from the first round of questions, on education. Note: Yvette Cooper’s will be added when we receive them. 1) How would you improve the quality and availability of childcare? Corbyn: It is important for all children to socialise together from an early age, and it’s a community good. We need to expand wraparound childcare at schools and free childcare […]

    Read more →
  • Comment Soft on welfare? The challenge of a popular welfare policy that works

    Soft on welfare? The challenge of a popular welfare policy that works

    We are being told that Labour lost votes through being seen as “too soft” on welfare. But we must understand the complexity of public attitudes in this area, and the difficulties of reconciling these attitudes with policy that works, and with the reality of the hardship caused by a “tough” policy. It must be Labour’s role to lead the debate on benefits, as well as follow public opinion. We can challenge the misinformation behind policies like Universal Credit and the […]

    Read more →
  • News Mary Creagh says failure to act in Syria “opened the door to ISIS”

    Mary Creagh says failure to act in Syria “opened the door to ISIS”

    Shadow International Development Secretary Mary Creagh has said that the failure of western governments to act against Bashar al-Assad in 2013 helped give rise to jihadist group ISIS. Writing for Progress Magazine, Creagh describes the vote that stopped the possibility of UK intervention in Syria as a “shock defeat” that “reverberated around the world”. Following the use of chemical weapons in Syria two years ago, the Government put forward a motion to begin military action against Assad’s regime. Creagh outlines the series […]

    Read more →
  • Comment Workers under the hammer: Sotheby’s workers need all the help they can get

    Workers under the hammer: Sotheby’s workers need all the help they can get

    Last week, I had the privilege to speak on a panel a number of women speaking about their experience of being in low paid work in London. Two days later, one of these women, I can’t name her for fairly obvious reasons although it still somehow feels wrong not to, lost her job simply for protesting for better pay. The common thread in the very moving stories – as the women described the long hours, poor conditions and inadequate rates […]

    Read more →
Share with your friends










Submit