Harman’s PPS resigns over pensions amendments

December 6, 2012 2:08 pm

As noted by Kevin Maguire on Twitter earlier today, Labour MP (and former NUM President) Ian Lavery has been forced to step down as Harriet Harman’s PPS, having brought an amendment in the Commons that argued Prison officers should be allowed to retire at 65, like police officers, firefighters and members of the armed forces. You can read Ian’s comments in the house here.

Both Lavery and Harriet Harman have released statements following Lavery’s resignation, with the Wansbeck MP saying:

Political life is about being prepared to make your own political choices but I also understand the need for discipline within the Labour party.

I tabled a series of amendments to the Public Sector Pensions Bill which I was asked to withdraw because they were not in line with the front bench position. I was not prepared to withdraw them and I stand by that.

I have therefore decided to resign my position as PPS to Harriet Harman. I’ve done this reluctantly and with great regret.

I greatly enjoyed and valued my time as PPS to the Deputy Leader and she and Ed Miliband will continue to have my full support and friendship.

Following Lavery’s resignation, Harriet Harman responded, saying:

I thank Ian for all his invaluable help, support and friendship as my PPS – particularly during my time as acting Leader .

 He will continue to play an important role in the PLP and in the wider Labour movement. 

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=514409408 Colin McCulloch

    Perhaps Ed Milliband would like to tackle 19 year old offenders when he’s 68 and show the Prison Officers how it’s meant to be done?

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Mike-Homfray/510980099 Mike Homfray

    Its a pity that there can’t be diversity on topics which there are quite legitimate differences of view on – its not as if this is anything which would fundamentally be seen as anti-Labour. I really don’t know why we are encouraging people to work past these years in any case – many people simply aren’t able to do so. Make it possible for people to take that option, sure, but I can foresee a whole lot of people clogging up the system because they can’t do the jobs they have done after 60

    • aracataca

      A lot of sense there Mike.

  • Daniel Speight

    So what is the shadow front bench position?

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/David-Trant/1105641645 David Trant

    At least there are people in politics with a shred of honour, I was beginning to doubt it.

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