Paul Kenny to step down as GMB General Secretary

December 4, 2012 12:21 pm

Paul Kenny has today told the GMB Central Executive Council that he intends to step down as GMB general secretary in late 2013. Kenny was appointed Acting General Secretary on 24 March 2005, and was first elected General Secretary in 2006. He was re-elected unopposed in 2010 for a further five years, but has decided to stand down before the end of his term.

Had Kenny served as General Secretary until 2015, the GMB – one of Labour’s biggest affiliates – would have been electing a new General Secretary around the time of the general election.

It has been suggested that Kenny took the decision to step down early to avoid such a scenario.

Update: Kenny is also the Chair of TULO – the grouping of Labour Party affiliated unions – so he’ll be standing down from that role too.

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