The words that will come back to haunt David Cameron

December 5, 2012 10:34 am

Today in the Autumn Statement George Osborne looks set to announce further austerity pain for Britain, but just a few weeks ago, David Cameron said:

“The good news will keep coming”

  • TomFairfax

    I’m surprised no one has taken the chance to mention all the ‘good’ news since on this post.
    Let’s start;

    – Borrowing up, not down.
    – Ratings agencies warning that triple A status is now at risk

    So that’s George’s only two stated objectives on taking office taking a beating.

    Then we have,
    – Theresa May being mauled by both sides for her technologically illiterate big brother spying proposals.
    – And now the spectacle of Andrew Mitchell who admitted to the offence of swearing at a police officer claiming it’s somehow OK because the person who brought the episdode to the public’s attention was pretending not to be a police officer, because somehow calling people plebs (unproven and not an offence) is why he resigned, not because he committed an offence at a time when the Home office was pushing zero tolerance of foul language directed at police officers and just after two unarmed police women had been gunned down mercilessly during the line of duty. Even DC has stopped short of publicly backing him. Which must be a first instance of good judgement demonstrated by this PM.

    If this shower were a football team, they’d be Glasgow Rangers, bankrupt and banished.

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