Poll reveals part-time penalty for careers

8th January, 2013 11:43 am

However the economy fares, this government is headed towards being the worst ever in terms of regression in job quality.

Fixated on the headline job figures, the Coalition has allowed part-time work and underemployment to blossom. A quarter of those in part-time roles say they want to work longer each week. Figures released today show apart from being less well-paid, part-time work often comes with a career penalty.

A new poll of 1,163 employed people, performed by Survation as part of the Unions21 Fair Work Commission has found 6 in 10 say their current job is just a way to pay the bills until they can find something better, rather than one step in part of a longer career. This is higher for part-time workers (76.6%) than full-time (54.8%).

Part-time workers are more likely to see ‘lack of opportunities to progress’ in their jobs as a barrier to workplace fairness, with 18.7% identifying it as their priority.

Any Labour vision of “fair work” must include the opportunity to advance, with workplace training a key factor. The poll found that part-time workers rated their current workplace training as worse, with only 31.14% rating it ‘good’ compared with 44.3% of full-time employees.

From the policies we presented in the survey, working people picked ‘a guaranteed minimum level of training for all employees’ as their favourite (40.5%). They also favoured an extension of paid time-off for training for basic skills to those up to the age of 25 (up from age 18) (17.3%), and a commitment from employers to give all employees statements on the training they should expect (15.6%).

These new figures should encourage Labour to make ‘fair work’ a priority issue in its policy review – and to challenge the Coalition on its record on job quality.

Dan Whittle is the Director of Unions21

To report anything from the comment section, please e-mail [email protected]
  • John Muldoon

    Colin Crooks has an equally brilliant analysis of under-employment, part-time working and worklessness in his book “How to make a million jobs – a charter for social enterprise”.

  • If it’s all so simple, why doesn’t the TUC show the way and buy up some of these companies that are going bust and re-employ the staff at the living wage, full time with the training that is necessary? Is it because it would lose money?

    • JoeDM

      Didn’t Tony Benn try something like that when he encouraged the setting up of cooperatives way back in the mid 70s when he was Industry Minister and it turned out to be a very costly waste of taxpayers money.

  • LordElpus

    “the Coalition has allowed part-time work and underemployment to blossom.”

    The *Coalition* has allowed this?

    Is it not the companies themselves that have asked their employees if they would prefer to lose hours or have redundancies in order to keep the company afloat during these testing times?

    Is it not the companies that have tried to keep experienced skilled staff on their books so that they have the staff with the relevant skills when the economy turns?

    It seems Mr Whittle as though you have found the questions to fit a pre-determined answer.

  • JoeDM

    Having a part time job is better than having no job at all.

Latest

  • Featured News Scotland Dugdale casts doubt on Corbyn’s ability to carry on

    Dugdale casts doubt on Corbyn’s ability to carry on

    Scottish Labour leader Kezia Dugdale has weighed in on Jeremy Corbyn’s leadership crisis, suggesting that he will not be able to do the job “effectively” following a no confidence vote this afternoon. Although Dugdale did not explicitly say that Corbyn should resign, she said that she would “not be able to do my job” if she was in his position and that he should “reflect” on the outcome of today’s Parliamentary Labour Party ballot. Dugdale is the latest major figure […]

    Read more →
  • Comment Featured Corbyn’s defeat at the hands of MPs puts him on course for a fresh leadership race

    Corbyn’s defeat at the hands of MPs puts him on course for a fresh leadership race

    So now we have a leadership race. Of course, it has not been announced yet, but it seems an inevitability after today’s heavy defeat for Jeremy Corbyn in a confidence vote among Labour MPs. Corbyn is down indeed, but not out. Despite being hit a tidal wave of resignations from the frontbench over the last three days he is hugely confident he can win another vote of Labour members and tonight issued a statement decrying the confidence motion as having “no constitutional […]

    Read more →
  • Featured News LIVEBLOG: Corbyn loses no confidence ballot 172-40

    LIVEBLOG: Corbyn loses no confidence ballot 172-40

    Corbyn is rapidly putting together a new front bench as resignations continue to pile in. While the Labour Party is in limbo, we will bring you all the Labour frontbench news as it comes through. 22.34: Scottish Labour leader Kezia Dugdale has cast doubt on Jeremy Corbyn’s ability to do his job. Read her comments here. 19.23: National Policy Forum (NPF) members are unhappy about the last minute cancelling of this weekend’s meeting. In the email cancelling the meeting, it was […]

    Read more →
  • Comment Featured Seats and Selections “Today’s vote is illegitimate” – Corbyn’s response to losing confidence vote

    “Today’s vote is illegitimate” – Corbyn’s response to losing confidence vote

    This is the statement issued by Jeremy Corbyn immediately after he lost today’s confidence motion among MPs. “In the aftermath of last week’s referendum, our country faces major challenges. Risks to the economy and living standards are growing. The public is divided. “The Government is in disarray. Ministers have made it clear they have no exit plan, but are determined to make working people pay with a new round of cuts and tax rises. “Labour has the responsibility to give a […]

    Read more →
  • Featured News Round-up: All the resignations, sackings and appointments

    Round-up: All the resignations, sackings and appointments

    You can keep up to date with all the latest comings and goings on our liveblog here. Below is a quick round-up of everyone who has left their position or been appointed to a new one so far. We’ll keep the list updated as new names come through. Left the Shadow Cabinet Luciana Berger, Shadow Minister for Mental Health Maria Eagle, Shadow Culture, Media and Sport Lisa Nandy, Shadow Energy and Climate Change Owen Smith, Shadow Work and Pensions Angela […]

    Read more →
x

LabourList Daily Email

Everything Labour. Every weekday morning

Share with your friends










Submit