“Secret” coup to oust Cameron – how many MPs are involved?

January 20, 2013 11:20 am

The Sunday Times reports this morning:

“An increasing number of backbenchers are privately discussing the possibility of attempting to unseat the prime minister before the poll in 2015 if the party continues to trail in the polls.

For the first time, discussions about ousting Cameron before 2015 appear to be spreading beyond the so-called “usual suspects” — a hard core of about 20 backbenchers who are hostile to his leadership.”

The Sunday Times suggests that 17 MPs have now written letters of “no confidence” to Graham Brady (head of the 1922 committee) – that’s far short of the 46 needed to trigger a leadership ballot – but it seems a “rebel reserve” of 55 MPs is being gathered. Of course if Nadine Dorries ever gets the whip returned that probably nudges the numbers of a little…

  • Chilbaldi

    Of course if they got a new leader in they would call an immediate general election, judging by their previous blood vessel popping anger at the “unelected” Gordon Brown.

    • aracataca

      Nice and mischevious there Chilbaldi.

  • Monkey_Bach

    Which Tory would be more appealing to the electorate than Cameron as far as the next general election goes? Grant Shapps? Michael Gove? George Osborne? It’s all good news for Labour, right? Eeek.

    • James Jacobs

      Or even Iain Duncan Smith!

      • Monkey_Bach

        That tyre’s so bald it’s illeagal! Eeek.

    • Monkey_Bach

      Retread tyres don’t have much mileage in them and nor do retread politicians… unless you’re slimy Peter Mandelson of course! Eeek.

  • Gabrielle

    The Tories have previously been unwilling to ditch Cameron because polling indicated that he seemed marginally more popular than his party (that isn’t saying much).

    If there’s civil unrest this summer, combined with the Tories getting their collective knickers in a twist about Europe, it may be curtains for Cameron. Cameron would at last be emulating his heroine, but not in the way he hoped.

    Gove seems the most likely replacement. Alastair Campbell recently blogged about his appearance on Any Questions that there’s a discrepancy between how the Tories think Gove is perceived by the public and how the public actually see him. In short they think Gove is one of their rare success stories, whereas the public find him pretty repellent.

    Gove’s popularity with the press will help him in a future leadership bid. The public won’t be impressed though.

  • Amber_Star

    Boris rumours again?

    • aracataca

      My hunch is that Cameron is going to be ousted in favour of Gove. And then in utter desperation, they’re going for BoJo, not realising that his success in London will not be replicated elsewhere. Johnson’s cronies in the London press (cough)new cycling czar Gilligan!(cough) made sure that Livingstone was thoroughly vilified, and Johnson bigged up. Plus Livingstone probably wasn’t the right choice.

      I don’t think the ‘let’s vote for Boris he’s so FUNNY’ strategy will work north of Watford. (Thank God.)

      • Chilbaldi

        Too right. London is an odd place that likes odd politicians.

  • http://twitter.com/youngian67 Ian Young

    I’m right behind them. The Tories need a man of experience in touch with the national zeitgiest. John Redwood is clearly the man for the job. I will start a campaign in the Spectator immediately.

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