Labour MEPs oppose “secret vote” on EU budget deal

8th February, 2013 5:17 pm

In a statement released tonight, Labour’s MEPs rejected the proposal put forward by ally Martin Schulz:

“Labour MEPs do not support the idea of a secret ballot on the MFF as proposed by Martin Schulz.  We  believe that a vote as important as this should be conducted in the most transparent way possible. 

“Labour MEPs welcome some of the savings that have been made in these negotiations so far. However,  we still believe this is a wasted opportunity to really reform the EU’s budget. 

“It looks likely that David Cameron has failed to secure a budget that will be most effective in tackling the consequences of the economic crisis and creating jobs and growth.  

 “Labour MEPs will  look at the details of the  deal and decide whether or not what is on offer is satisfactory in the current climate.” 

  • Hugh

    “It looks likely that David Cameron has failed to secure a
    budget that will be most effective in tackling the consequences of the
    economic crisis and creating jobs and growth. ”

    How so? What details – other than the overall figure – had Labour actually seen to make this comment less than 2 hours after the deal was announced?

    • jaime taurosangastre candelas

      If Keynesianism works at all – of which there is reasonable debate – it would only work in practicality if the entire economic “system” is controlled by one central figure. This is possible in single nations with their own currencies and central government. It is laughable that with the added complexities of an international system just “slightly” harnessed to common control measures, and arguing about every little detail for the benefit of particular parts of the system, that Keynesianism could work across the EU. Everyone and every special interest will want the stimulus to be applied to their own interest, whether it be French farmers who benefit from the CAP, or the British financial services industry, or German manufacturing, or the southern countries’ summer tourist industries, or the Eastern cheap labour industries, or the northern Italian fashion industry, or the Spanish and Portuguese fishing industry, and so on. And of course none of these special interests will want to pay for the stimulus – some other actor will be assumed to pick up the bill.

      If European Labour argue for a Keynes stimulus across Europe, it will very rapidly degenerate into a “slug-fest” between interested parties, and nothing at all will be agreed.

    • David B

      Because they oppose for the sake of opposition

  • David B

    If the secret vote is carried will they all declare publicly how they vote

    • http://twitter.com/Bobbylad Bobby

      I think the point of the secret vote is so MEPs can vote in favour of the budget and then claim they didn’t. In legislatures where secret ballots are held, often in key committee meetings behind closed doors, members will claim to have voted one way publicly and voted “in the best interest” privately. This is an area of political culture clash within Europe I think.

      • David B

        I think it is the opposite, I think it is so MEP’s can vote against the budget in private and then in public state they are keeping to the policy of their leader and avoid the PR plunder this would create.

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