Labour MEPs oppose “secret vote” on EU budget deal

February 8, 2013 5:17 pm

In a statement released tonight, Labour’s MEPs rejected the proposal put forward by ally Martin Schulz:

“Labour MEPs do not support the idea of a secret ballot on the MFF as proposed by Martin Schulz.  We  believe that a vote as important as this should be conducted in the most transparent way possible. 

“Labour MEPs welcome some of the savings that have been made in these negotiations so far. However,  we still believe this is a wasted opportunity to really reform the EU’s budget. 

“It looks likely that David Cameron has failed to secure a budget that will be most effective in tackling the consequences of the economic crisis and creating jobs and growth.  

 “Labour MEPs will  look at the details of the  deal and decide whether or not what is on offer is satisfactory in the current climate.” 

  • Hugh

    “It looks likely that David Cameron has failed to secure a
    budget that will be most effective in tackling the consequences of the
    economic crisis and creating jobs and growth. ”

    How so? What details – other than the overall figure – had Labour actually seen to make this comment less than 2 hours after the deal was announced?

    • jaime taurosangastre candelas

      If Keynesianism works at all – of which there is reasonable debate – it would only work in practicality if the entire economic “system” is controlled by one central figure. This is possible in single nations with their own currencies and central government. It is laughable that with the added complexities of an international system just “slightly” harnessed to common control measures, and arguing about every little detail for the benefit of particular parts of the system, that Keynesianism could work across the EU. Everyone and every special interest will want the stimulus to be applied to their own interest, whether it be French farmers who benefit from the CAP, or the British financial services industry, or German manufacturing, or the southern countries’ summer tourist industries, or the Eastern cheap labour industries, or the northern Italian fashion industry, or the Spanish and Portuguese fishing industry, and so on. And of course none of these special interests will want to pay for the stimulus – some other actor will be assumed to pick up the bill.

      If European Labour argue for a Keynes stimulus across Europe, it will very rapidly degenerate into a “slug-fest” between interested parties, and nothing at all will be agreed.

    • David B

      Because they oppose for the sake of opposition

  • David B

    If the secret vote is carried will they all declare publicly how they vote

    • http://twitter.com/Bobbylad Bobby

      I think the point of the secret vote is so MEPs can vote in favour of the budget and then claim they didn’t. In legislatures where secret ballots are held, often in key committee meetings behind closed doors, members will claim to have voted one way publicly and voted “in the best interest” privately. This is an area of political culture clash within Europe I think.

      • David B

        I think it is the opposite, I think it is so MEP’s can vote against the budget in private and then in public state they are keeping to the policy of their leader and avoid the PR plunder this would create.

Latest

  • Comment Where is Labour going on housing?

    Where is Labour going on housing?

    If Labour Conference was great for the Health Service, it was something of a disaster for housing. Statements by the Treasury team will make it very difficult for Labour to meet its own target of 200,000 new homes a year. The house building figures are well known and they are truly dreadful. We have failed to build enough homes for a generation and now we face at least another five years of inadequate supply even if Labour wins. It is […]

    Read more →
  • Comment Exposing UKIP for what they are

    Exposing UKIP for what they are

    I was born in Doncaster Royal Infirmary, less than a mile and a half from where UKIP are holding their party conference this weekend. I grew up in a nearby pit village in South Yorkshire, close to the Barnsley East constituency that I represent today in Parliament. The sight of all those UKIP politicians in Doncaster – Margaret Thatcher worshippers, ex-bankers, former big money Tory donors – trying to pass off as born-again champions of the working classes bordered on […]

    Read more →
  • Featured Six answers for Jeremy Hunt – and six questions

    Six answers for Jeremy Hunt – and six questions

    Today Labour activists will be out in force across the country to campaign on the NHS. They’ll have the wind in their sails after Conference, buoyed by the fact that the Tories are rattled and now on the back foot. You can always tell when Jeremy Hunt is rattled. He starts sending out dodgy tweets. When most people might reasonably have expected the Health Secretary to be focused on sorting out the A&E crisis, he instead took to Twitter this […]

    Read more →
  • Comment However MPs voted on airstrikes – they must now hold the government to account

    However MPs voted on airstrikes – they must now hold the government to account

    Britain is now at war with ISIL. At some point over the weekend that will cease to be a technical statement and become an on-the-ground reality. RAF jets will take part in airstrikes against the so-called Islamic State. In concert with the Iraqi army and Kurdish forces they will attempt to damage and drive back ISIL, stopping their otherwise relentless military gains. It is a tough but necessary task. The vote in the Commons today was not a close one. […]

    Read more →
  • Featured News The 24 Labour MPs who opposed airstrikes against ISIL

    The 24 Labour MPs who opposed airstrikes against ISIL

    The vast majority of Labour MPs (and MPs from across the Commons) voted in favour of airstrikes against ISIL in Iraq today, but 24 Labour MPs voted against the party whip and opposed airstrikes. One of them (Rushanara Ali) resigned as a Shadow Education Minister as a result of a “formal abstention”. Here’s the full list of Labour’s 24 rebels: Diane Abbott Graham Allen Anne Begg Ronnie Campbell Martin Caton Katy Clark Ian Davidson Paul Flynn Stephen Hepburn Kate Hoey Kelvin Hopkins […]

    Read more →
7ads6x98y