The content of every policy motion passed at Labour conference 2022

Katie Neame

Labour passed all 17 of the policy motions discussed at its party conference this year, covering topics including proportional representation, a £15 minimum wage, public ownership and the abolition of the House of Lords.

All of the motions were passed by delegates on a show of hands, meaning the result was clear to see on the conference floor and did not require a ‘card vote’ to confirm.

The party is not bound by policy passed at its annual conference – even if motions are passed unanimously. It is Labour’s national policy forum (NPF) and ‘Clause V’ meeting before an election that decides which parts of the party programme are included in the manifesto.


The growing challenges of our economy one (composite motion one)

Put forward by Unite, this motion was passed by conference on Monday afternoon. The motion commits Labour to calling for a “new political and societal consensus” to include taking back control of essential services and utilities through new models of democratic and efficient public ownership.

The motion calls on the party to provide a “genuine alternative plan to solve the cost-of-living crisis, to prevent profiteering and reshape the economy to the benefit of workers and communities”. It also urges Labour to support trade unions as the “most effective vehicles to organise workers”.

The full text of the motion can be found in our news piece here.


The growing challenges of our economy two (composite motion two)

This motion, proposed by Usdaw, was backed by delegates on the second day of conference. It calls on Labour to back the introduction of a requirement for employers to consult with workers on new workplace technologies.

Usdaw’s motion also urges Labour to support a “significant and long-term investment” in skills funding, including the reinstatement of the union learning fund across England and for the party to back strengthened collective rights including reducing the thresholds for trade union recognition.

The full text of the motion can be found in our news piece here.


Investing in infrastructure one (composite motion three)

The motion, put forward by ASLEF, passed on Monday afternoon. It reaffirms Labour’s commitment to a publicly-owned railway and the delivery of key infrastructure projects.

The motion also resolves that conference “stands in solidarity with workers taking industrial action over the cost-of-living crisis” and states that a “good way” of showing solidarity with workers is to visit them on picket lines.

It adds: “Conference supports a negotiated settlement in the rail dispute and supports all Labour MPs attending picket lines until such an outcome is reached.”

The full text of the motion can be found in our news piece here.


Investing in infrastructure two (composite motion four)

Proposed by the CWU, this motion was also passed on Monday. It called on conference to give its “unequivocal support” to all UK workers “taking strike action for higher pay and in defence of their jobs, terms and conditions”.

The motion reaffirms that Labour in power will bring Royal Mail back into public ownership, reunite it with the Post Office and create a publicly-owned Post Bank.

The full text of the motion can be found in our news piece here.


Workers’ pay (composite motion five)

The motion, submitted by UNISON, states that the “only way to avoid the steepest drop in living standards since the 1950s is to give Britain’s workers a pay rise”. It was backed by delegates on Monday.

The motion calls on Labour to commit to pay rises “at least in line with inflation”, the introduction of a £15 per hour minimum wage and reform of the welfare system to “protect dignity and provide adequate income”.

It also urges the party to ensure access to affordable, good quality childcare that allows parents to return to work and pays early-years staff a decent wage.

The full text of the motion can be found in our news piece here.


Social care (composite motion six)

The motion, put forward by Colchester Constituency Labour Party (CLP), was the first of a second tranche of motions passed by delegates on Monday. It calls upon the next Labour government to transform care provision, widen entitlement and reduce barriers to access.

The motion urges the party to raise the quality of care based on enforced national standards and shift the focus to prevention and early intervention with a new principle of ‘home first’ to ensure choice and control.

It calls on Labour to deliver a National Care Service with nationally mandated standards “but designed and delivered locally” and to introduce a new deal for care workers, which ensures staff are recognised for the work they do “with the pay, terms and conditions they deserve”.

The full text of the motion can be found in our news piece here.


Equalities (composite motion seven)

The motion, proposed by Unite’s Jayne Taylor, states that conference believes the government has “deepened income and wealth inequality and systemic inequalities experienced by women, Black and Asian, disabled and LGBT+ people”. It was passed by delegates on Monday evening.

The motion calls on Labour to commit to allowing cross-employer comparators in equal pay cases and “urgently” prioritising its commitment to establish a fair pay agreement in social care.

It urges the party to reaffirm its commitment to fully implementing the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (UNCRPD) and to “appropriately” fund disabled benefits, housing, education and the care system to “underpin the dignity and living standards of disabled people”.

It calls on Labour to restore the rights of migrant domestic workers, commit to a new Race Equality Act, including actions to close the race pay gap, strengthen equal pay and pension rights for women and take action on disability and LGBT+ pay gaps.

The full text of the motion can be found in our news piece here.


Electoral reform one (composite motion eight)

Proposed by Ashford CLP, this motion was backed by conference on Monday. It calls on Labour to make a commitment to introduce proportional representation (PR) for general elections in the party’s next election manifesto.

The motion urges the party to change the voting system for general elections to a form of PR in Labour’s first term in office and to convene an “open and inclusive process” to decide the specific proportional voting system it will introduce.

The full text of the motion can be found in our news piece here.


Electoral reform two (composite motion nine)

The motion, put forward by Blackpool North and Cleveleys CLP, was passed by delegates on Monday evening. It calls for Labour to replace the ministerial code with a legally binding contract, with “clear consequences” for breaches.

The motion urges the party to increase the Electoral Commission’s powers to “hold political parties, candidates and MPs to account if they are found to have broken the rules”. It adds that MPs “shouldn’t ordinarily” hold second jobs and that any secondary income “can’t surpass” their MP salary, with some exceptions.

The full text of the motion can be found in our news piece here.


Electoral reform three (composite motion ten)

The motion, which was proposed by Glasgow Anniesland CLP, was the final motion voted on and passed by delegates on Monday. It resolves that conference believes that Labour should commit to the abolition of the House of Lords and its replacement with an elected second chamber or senate.

The motion adds that the new body should be “democratically elected and must reflect the makeup and identity of the United Kingdom”.

The full text of the motion can be found in our news piece here.


Violence against women and girls (composite motion 11)

This motion, put forward by Ribble Valley CLP, was passed by conference on Tuesday afternoon. It calls on Labour to campaign to make misogyny a hate crime, to be recorded as such by all police forces across the UK and prosecuted by the Crown Prosecution Service.

The motion urges the party to require police forces to record all instances of femicide and assess the extent and impact of incel (involuntary celibate) groups both online and offline.

The full text of the motion can be found in our news piece here.


Climate crisis (composite motion 12)

The motion, moved by SERA, calls on Labour in government to recognise a “legal duty of care” regarding the climate change and biodiversity emergencies and recognise the UK’s international legal responsibilities in that area. It was backed by delegates on Tuesday afternoon.

The motion demands that the party offer a programme that shows “global climate and energy policy leadership” and work with UK nations, local authorities, FE colleges, businesses and unions to devise and deliver the training necessary for the skilled workforce required to achieve its renewables and energy efficiency plans.

The full text of the motion can be found in our news piece here.


Ukraine (composite motion 13)

This motion – put forward by the GMB – calls on Labour to support a “free, united Ukraine” and a peaceful end to the conflict that secures the territorial integrity of the country. It was passed by conference on Tuesday evening.

The motion demands that the party support the provision of military, economic, diplomatic and humanitarian assistance to Ukraine and back calls for International Criminal Court (ICC) investigations into potential war crimes committed by Russian forces.

It calls on Labour to support a long-term strategy to “tackle [Vladimir] Putin and dictators around the world” and for the party to back an increase in funding for UK defence manufacturing “so that the UK can rebuild lost industrial capacity and jobs, better aid Ukraine and ensure its forces are equipped to keep Britain and our allies safe”.

The motion also calls for Labour to support the Ukrainian decision to apply for EU membership and the decision of Finland and Sweden to join NATO.

The full text of the motion can be found in our news piece here.


Public services and local government funding (composite motion 14)

This motion, proposed by UNISON, was the final motion to be voted on and passed by delegates on Tuesday. It calls on Labour to commit to “proper long-term funding” for local government services and ensuring local government workers receive a pay rise each year at least in line with RPI.

The motion urges the party to “combat” further privatisation, academisation and outsourcing and work to bring public services back in-house.

It states that conference opposes the Home Office white paper Reforming Our Fire and Rescue Service and commits the Labour Party to “vigorously campaigning” alongside the FBU in defence of firefighters and their service.

The motion also calls on Labour to commit to significant investment in public services to protect retail workers, including by delivering nationwide initiatives that support the complete rehabilitation of offenders and investing in community-led policing initiatives.

The full text of the motion can be found in our news piece here.


Health (composite motion 15)

The motion, put forward by the Socialist Health Association, calls on Labour to repeal the Health and Care Act 2022 and eliminate integrated care systems. It was backed by conference on Wednesday morning.

The motion demands that the party establish a “publicly-funded, publicly-provided, publicly accountable, universal and comprehensive” National Health Service and return all privatised portions of the NHS to public control upon forming a government.

It also urges the party to establish a publicly-funded and publicly-provided National Care Service and to ensure that a Labour government and economy are fit to handle another pandemic

The full text of the motion can be found in CAC Report 4.


Early years and childcare (composite motion 16)

The motion, moved by Bristol South CLP, was the second motion passed by delegates on Wednesday morning. It urges Labour to consider childcare as “infrastructure” and a “key part of regional and national industrial strategies”.

It calls on the party to develop an industrial strategy, in partnership with trade unions, service providers, service users and other stakeholders, that includes good quality, affordable and accessible childcare for all and professional recognition for early-years childcare workers.

The full text of the motion can be found in CAC Report 4.


Universal free school meals (emergency motion)

This emergency motion, put forward by the Socialist Educational Association, calls on Labour to back the ‘No Child Left Behind‘ campaign and commit to rolling out universal free school meals for all pupils in primary and secondary schools. It was the final motion passed by delegates at Labour conference 2022.

The motion urges Labour to campaign at all levels for an increase in school funding to cover increased energy costs, free school meals for all, breakfast clubs and decent pay rises for teachers and support staff. It also expresses solidarity with education unions should they take action to protect their members’ living standards.

The full text of the emergency motion can be found in CAC Report 4.

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