Dear Lib Dems, this is a joke? Right?

January 17, 2013 8:36 am

From today’s Independent:

“The Liberal Democrats are considering whether to promise to reduce the £9,000 cap on university tuition fees in their manifesto at the next general election.

Senior Liberal Democrats sources told The Independent that the idea is among options being looked at by a working party on higher education policy.”

Is this how the Lib Dems plan to regain credibility in 2015? “We want to cut tuition fees…and this time we mean it…”

  • Monkey_Bach

    “… there will be more rejoicing in heaven over one sinner who repents than over ninety-nine righteous persons who do not …”

    (Luke 15:10)

    Would that the Labour Party repented its sins as far as Atos and similar atrocities go.

    • AlanGiles

      I was just trying to remember who introduced tuition fees in the first place?.

      Of course, LABOUR!

      • AlanGiles

        Are the two lickspittles voting that comment down, denying that it was Labour which introduced tuition fees?. Perhaps you re not old enough to remember.

        • Redshift1

          a) Loads of Labour MPs voted against it.
          b) It was highly controversial in the party.
          c) However much I don’t like tuition fees, that doesn’t blind me to the fact that there is a big difference between 3k and 9k.

          • aracataca

            This is correct Redshift. In addition this issue is also about making promises that are not kept. Labour did not promise not to introduce student fees at the 2001 general election ( they were introduced in the subsequent Parliament). At the 1997 general election it did promise not to introduce tuition fees and kept its promise during the subsequent 1997-2001 Parliament.
            Of course the Fib Dems made a big deal of their opposition to tuition fees at the last election and took a few seats with high student populations on the basis of that promise.
            Labour was committed to expanding Higher Education in order to include more working class people in it and tuition fees had to be introduced in order to fund that expansion. I am not a fanatical class warrior but when I went to University in the 1970s the overwhelming majority of people there were from middle class backgrounds – that was neither a fair, equitable or sustainable state of affairs. Like you I don’t like tuition fees but there is a clear difference between what Labour did and what the Fibs did in relation to this issue.

          • MonkeyBot5000

            The only difference between £3k and £9k is time.

            As soon as the idea of tuition fees was put forward, we knew they would just increase over time and unless Labour were expecting to be in power forever, they should have seen something like this happening when the Tories eventually got in.

          • aracataca

            ‘The future is unwritten’ – Joe Strummer.

          • AlanGiles

            Exactly. Once you set a precedent it is easier for somebody else to come along and enlarge on it. This is what angers me about Labour, pretending great outrage about issues like this and welfare reform courtesy of ATOS when it was they who started it. It is no good them pretending to be shocked like a Mother Superior outraged at being approached by a kerb-crawler.

            Had the New Labour shower not instigated tuiton fees (or Freud for that matter) the Tories/Coalition would have had to start from square one, and then Labour could be holier-than-thou.

          • Redshift1

            Well frankly I did argue at the time that introducing fees would run the risk of eye-watering fee hikes (like the 9k) by a future Tory government (didn’t envisage LibDem complicity at that stage of course), regardless of whether 3k was suitable or not, once the precedent of user-payment fees was set. So I agree with you there.

            Nevertheless, that doesn’t make the Labour position ‘the same’ or only ‘a matter of time’ different from the coalition position. Whether or not the Labour position was right, it was both qualitatively and quantitatively different from the Tories and Lib Dems who have basically transferred higher education funding almost entirely onto the user from the state (by making the move simultaneous with an 80% cut).

          • aracataca

            You are completely right Redshift the 2 positions of the Fib Dems and Labour on this issue are not interchangeable.

        • aracataca

          How does calling people lickspittles help the debate on this issue?

  • Pingback: The Lib Dem Dilemma | The Descrier()

Latest

  • News Scotland Neil Findlay gets UNISON endorsement for Scottish Labour leader

    Neil Findlay gets UNISON endorsement for Scottish Labour leader

    Neil Findlay’s campaign for the Scottish Labour leadership has received the backing of a second trade union today. Following a hustings event at the annual Scottish UNISON Labour Link forum this morning, the public sector worker union chose to give its backing to Findlay. UNISON is Scotland’s largest trade union, and this announcement will be seen as a big boost to the MSP’s campaign. He already has the support of ASLEF, the only other union to have made an announcement […]

    Read more →
  • Comment The London primary process is a wasted opportunity to engage more people

    The London primary process is a wasted opportunity to engage more people

    The Labour party has made the mistake of treating the primary election process in London as something to be got out of the way, rather than seeing its potential to get people re-engaged in politics. Both the decision to charge potential Labour supporters £3 to take part in the ballot, and the rushed timetable are mistakes that betray Labour’s fears about genuinely opening up the party to a wider audience. The grassroots are the lifeblood of the party and they […]

    Read more →
  • News Scotland Katy Clark will run for Scottish Labour deputy leader

    Katy Clark will run for Scottish Labour deputy leader

    Katy Clark, MP for North Ayrshire and Arran, has announced that she will run for deputy leader of the Scottish Labour Party. The position is vacant following Anas Sarwar’s resignation on Thursday night, and the contest will run alongside the race for leader. A timetable for the deputy leadership has yet to be formalised, and Sarwar will remain interim leader until December 13th. Clark has been an MP since 2005, and is seen as a left-winger within the Parliamentary Labour […]

    Read more →
  • News Scotland “We didn’t listen” – Jim Murphy launches campaign with apology to the Scottish people

    “We didn’t listen” – Jim Murphy launches campaign with apology to the Scottish people

    Jim Murphy will officially launch his campaign for the Scottish Labour leadership with a speech in Edinburgh today. He will focus on the Party’s failure to listen to the public, leading to subsequent defeats in 2007 and 2011. Murphy will use the experiences from his 100 towns tour, where he spent 100 days going around Scotland holding street meetings to campaign for a No vote this summer, to talk about the appetite for change around the country. “I want to apologise […]

    Read more →
  • Comment Why Miliband’s plans to scrap the Lords should be welcomed

    Why Miliband’s plans to scrap the Lords should be welcomed

    Ed Miliband’s announcement of plans to replace the House of Lords with an elected Senate is welcome on two counts. Firstly, it’s good to see Labour committing once again to reforming the House of Lords after ducking the issue for reasons of low politics earlier in the parliament. Choosing to drive a wedge between the Lib Dems and the Tories on constitutional affairs may well have reaped dividends (not least, the abandonment of the gerrymandering bill), but it was sad […]

    Read more →