Why won’t Cameron criticise (or sack) the man he was sat next to at PMQs?

February 27, 2013 1:00 pm

cameronandjones

It’s a shame that no Labour MPs decided to use one of their scripted questions to ask about the vile views of the Welsh Secretary David Jones today. Less than two weeks ago he said:

“I regard marriage as an institution that has developed over many centuries, essentially for the provision of a warm and safe environment for the upbringing of children, which is clearly something that two same sex partners can’t do.”

So far the Prime Minister hasn’t publicly criticised the Welsh Secretary or asked him to apologise. In fact, we’re not sure that he’s made any comment about the disgraceful comments of the Welsh Secretary at all. The most we can find is a Downing Street source saying:

“Gay marriage and gay adoption are both conscience issues and, as such, have been treated as free votes. The Prime Minister is a supporter of both.”

That’s neither a criticism or an admonishment of Jones, whose views have been quite rightly described as hate speech. So Mr Cameron, here’s a question for you to ponder about the man you were sat next to this afternoon:

  • Are you comfortable having someone with such bigoted views in your cabinet?
  • And why are you too afraid to criticise him – or sack him? Is it because many of your backbenchers feel the same…?
  • Hugh

    He’s already clarified – and it was pretty clear from the initial interview – that he intended to simply reiterate the argument that homosexual people cannot fulfill the intention of marriage in the procreation and upbringing of children. Given you also note he doesn’t oppose same sex adoption, your insistence on describing his comments as “vile” is a bit childish.

    • http://www.facebook.com/matthew.blott Matthew Blott

      You got there before me :-)

    • http://www.facebook.com/people/Mike-Homfray/510980099 Mike Homfray

      But that isn’t what he said….

      • Hugh

        Yes, he expressed himself badly. It was pretty obvious at the time that that was what he meant, and explicit in the clarification he issued (which Mark covered in the post linked to). Unless you therefore want to upbraid him for a “vile” slip of the tongue, I’m not entirely sure of your point.

  • http://www.facebook.com/matthew.blott Matthew Blott

    You might not agree with the Welsh Secretary’s views but unless there’s something else he’s said you haven’t reported calling them “vile” is completely over the top.

    • frp4914

      It certainly is most extraordinary. I don’t believe I agree with the Welsh Secretary’s view, but using this ‘vile’ and ‘hate speech’ rhetoric is perverse.

    • cari_esky5

      I guess you could say that his views about a same sex couple not able to offer a warm and safe environment for raising children is also over the top if he has no proof to offer this assumption.

  • http://www.facebook.com/people/Mike-Homfray/510980099 Mike Homfray

    The views are also directly in contradiction with existing policy on fostering, adoption and same-sex parenting, which are completely separate from the marriage debate. Someone clearly hasn’t informed David Jones

  • http://twitter.com/MMBTycalibre MMB Tycalibre

    Hate speech, lol.

    Silly Labourlist.

  • markfergusonuk

    So saying that gay people can’t provide a safe environment for kids isn’t vile? It is in my opinion

    • Hugh

      Labour candidate says he felt sorry IRA missed Thatcher and Ed refuses to condemn: All fine, no problem.

      Tory MP expresses himself poorly but clarifies he was not putting forward the “vile” opinion you attribute to him: Outrage Dave hasn’t sacked him.

      It’s a funny old world.

    • frp4914

      Mark, I disagree with his view. This is an emotive topic, but progress in our society isn’t made by labelling any ill-informed, misguided opinion as ‘vile’. There are plenty of atrocities in our world that truly merit that term.
      Regards, Andy.

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