Labour announces campaign for “National Memorial” to commemorate Afghan war

April 25, 2013 1:52 pm

The party have today called on the Government to “lead a national effort” to build a National War in commemoration of the war in Afghanistan, and the fatalities and injuries suffered by British Armed Forces.

Announcing the campaign, Shadow Defence Secretary Jim Murphy said:

“It is essential there is meaningful commemoration of our Forces’ painful sacrifice in Afghanistan. This must be a national memorial that the whole nation feels part of. The public should be involved from the start so that they can show their sympathy and solidarity. Everyone should have the chance to offer their ideas and insights so we get a truly brilliant memorial. I hope the Prime Minister will personally oversee the project. Those who give their lives will never be forgotten by their families, and it is right their names live publicly forever.”

  • AlanGiles

    A sacrifice, Murphy, that would not have needed to be made if Tony Blair hadn’t been so keen on being George Bush’s poodle and going off to war yet again. If only the soft politicians who make such decisions had to fight themselves, they would be a lot less keen on warfare.

    • i_bid

      Yep, and lets erect some more symbolism to paper over those sacrifices. Makes you sick, doesn’t it?

    • http://twitter.com/waterwards dave stone

      And the reprehensible Murphy will deliver more of the same* – if he gets the chance. At least, unlike previous disasters, we have been forewarned.

      * http://www.jimmurphymp.com/news-room/Speeches/news.aspx?p=1041435

    • jaime taurosangastre candelas

      With respect, Alan, are you not able to separate your views on Tony Blair, with having some respect and feeling for those who died in the service of their country?

      I completely support Jim Murphy’s idea. I hope that there is a national memorial to those soldiers who did not choose to go there, but went because their country sent them. We will never know, maybe some did leave the Army because of personal political opposition to the national policy to Afghanistan, and that is their right. Maybe some went, with misgivings. But those that did serve and die there should not be forgotten because the policy was possibly wrong.

      As for Afghanistan itself, my thoughts are that after 9/11, and the knowledge that Al Qaeda were hosted there by the Afghan Government, what did you expect the Americans to do? They behaved remarkably normally: gave the Afghans an ultimatum to eject Al-Qaeda, when they did not they evicted the Taliban Government and Al-Qaeda by force. Since then, they have been involved in a possibly “unwinnable” battle. If you look at the casualty numbers, it was only after the war in Iraq started in 2003- a completely separate matter – that the Taliban returned to fight in Afghanistan.

      I feel that Iraq was a battle unwisely entered into on a probably false premise, but that does not stop me from thinking that Afghanistan was a “just” intervention. And indeed, for the same reasons as in my second paragraph, I would also support a memorial to our soldiers who died in Iraq.

      • AlanGiles

        Jaime. I am not blaming the service personnel in any way whatsoever. They were only doing what they were ordered to do – thanks to that big girls blouse of an effette Prime Minister we had at the time – and Murphy is as war-minded as his master was.

        If it is left to the likes of Murphy, sadly there will be many more casualties in other parts of the world thanks to his determination to “intervene”

  • Mark Myword

    I’m not sure about this. Already we have memorials in virtually every community – on my local cenotaph we already have the name of a local squaddy who lost his life in Afghanistan. He together with all the others so recorded, is remembered every November by the local community within which he lived and where his relatives still live. I am not sure why Afghanistan rather than, say, Iraq should call for this initiative.

  • FMcGonigal

    I hope we can also commemorate the fatalities and injuries suffered by civilians.

  • Daniel Speight

    Government and shadow defense ministers should be embedded in front line units for a minimum period of six months. Probably be good if prime ministers and opposition leaders were too. Maybe then they would be a bit more careful in the future, both in policy matters and of the troops’ safety.

Latest

  • Featured 5 reasons why Labour’s tuition fees plan is a big improvement

    5 reasons why Labour’s tuition fees plan is a big improvement

    I was ready to be underwhelmed by Ed Miliband’s tuition fees announcement today. In recent weeks the outlines of Labour’s HE funding policy had been clear, leaving little scope for a ‘big bang’ announcement. And besides, cutting tuition fees to £6,000 didn’t look like a particularly radical reshaping of a system that is quite critically flawed. If the only policy that had been announced today had been a cut in the headline tuition fees figure I’d have been a bit […]

    Read more →
  • News Video Ed Miliband gives “official Labour Party position” on that dress

    Ed Miliband gives “official Labour Party position” on that dress

    The debate over the colour of a dress has been today’s biggest story. By this morning, the original Buzzfeed story had been read by more than 20 million people, all trying to figure out whether the dress was white and gold or black and blue. With Labour leader Ed Miliband doing the media rounds to promote the party’s latest election pledge to cut tuition fees, it was only a matter of time before he was asked his position on the […]

    Read more →
  • News Full text: Miliband’s speech pledging tuition fees cut

    Full text: Miliband’s speech pledging tuition fees cut

    Ed Miliband MP, Leader of the Labour Party, in a speech at Leeds College of Music, said: Today is about the young people of Britain. And all who care about them right across the generations. I have listened to you. And today I pledge the government I lead is going to work with you to change your future for the better. Four years ago I said the Promise of Britain – that the next generation will do better than the […]

    Read more →
  • Featured News Labour confirm pledge to slash tuition fees by a third in email to supporters

    Labour confirm pledge to slash tuition fees by a third in email to supporters

    As expected, Labour have today confirmed that they pledge to cut tuition fees from £9,000 to £6,000 a year. In an email sent out to thousands of supporters by Ed Miliband in the last few moments. This is the fourth Labour election pledge (after reducing the deficit, controlling immigration, and funding for the NHS), and Miliband says it is a promise they will keep: “And unlike with certain other parties, that’s a promise you can rely on.” Update: Here’s the […]

    Read more →
  • Comment Labour has given young people a chance to shape their own futures

    Labour has given young people a chance to shape their own futures

    It is a harsh reality that too often politics responds to those who shout the loudest. We know that young people are currently far less likely to vote than their parents and grandparents, and as a result they have been ignored for too long and written off as ‘non-voters’. The situation is made worse by the missing million who have dropped off the electoral register this year alone, many of whom are young people and students. The Tories seem relaxed […]

    Read more →
lablist-logo mark-ferguson maya conor coffee-cup
Everything Labour. Every Weekday Morning
×