Cooper joins Labour leadership race – and says she wants to “make life better for Britain’s families”

13th May, 2015 10:04 pm

Yvette Cooper Shadow Home Secretary

Yvette Cooper has tonight become the latest candidate to join the Labour leadership race – following Liz Kendall, Chuka Umunna and Andy Burnham – by saying she wants to “make life better for Britain’s families”. In an article for the Mirror, the Shadow Home Secretary (who is believed to have already garnered significant support amongst MPs) said that:

“Labour lost because we didn’t convince enough people in all parts of the country that we had the answers to match up with their ambitions.”

Cooper’s full Mirror piece can be read below:

Millions of Mirror readers woke up to a bitter disappointment last Friday morning – the prospect of five more years of Tory Government.

But let’s face facts. Labour lost because we didn’t convince enough people in all parts of the country that we had the answers to match up with their ambitions.

Our promise of hope wasn’t strong enough to drown out the Tory and UKIP voices of fear.

That’s what we need to change. And that’s why today I’m putting forward my name to stand as next leader of the Labour party.

I’m proud of the things Labour has done together – building the NHS, bringing in the National Minimum Wage, expanding universities, creating Sure Start. And helping young people get jobs even in the face of a financial storm.

But as a mum of three children I’m in politics not because I’m proud of the past, but because I care so much more about the future.

All of us as parents want the best for our kids – and we worry about what jobs they’ll get to do, whether they’ll be able to afford a home and family of their own.

We want them to be ambitious, to have great opportunities – and above all for all our family to be happy and safe.

Yet too few people feel confident about their own and their children’s future in such a fast changing world.

The digital age is creating amazing opportunities, but many jobs are out of date.

Long gone are the jobs for life. But gone too is the security of a life-long trade or skill.

Under the Tories, for too many people pay has fallen, living standards have been squeezed and they have been left behind.

So yes, people want to know where the good quality jobs of the future are coming from – whether they have a chance at them, and whether they will be in their own town or just miles away in the city.

In the end, Labour didn’t convince enough people that we had the answers.

They liked a lot of what we had to say, about raising the minimum wage, expanding childcare, cutting tax for low paid workers and banning bad zero hours contracts. But for many people it wasn’t enough to give them hope and confidence we could match all their ambitions for the future.

And when there’s too little hope, optimism or confidence, the politics of anger, fear and division takes over – that’s what the Tories, the SNP and UKIP all exploited and campaigned on in this election.

The fracturing of politics reflects the fracturing of our country and our communities. Divided between rich and poor, north and south, city and small town. And it leaves Britain a darker, narrower place.

But that’s why Labour needs to be bigger in our appeal, bolder in our ambitions and brighter about the future.

Going back to the remedies of the past, of Gordon Brown or Tony Blair, won’t keep up with the way the world has changed.

We need a Labour party that moves beyond the old labels of left and right, and focuses four-square on the future. Credible, compassionate, creative, and connected to the day to day realities of life.

The Tories don’t have any of the answers for Britain’s future. All they will do is divide us, holding families back, widening inequality, helping only the richest in the country while everyone else gets left behind.

So that is why the next Labour prime minister needs clear purpose; a clear view of the problems we face and a clear priorities for the future.

I don’t want to be the next leader of the Labour Party just because there’s a vacancy, I want to make life better for Britain’s families.

It isn’t enough to say we can stop bad things happening, we need to show how good we can be for people too.

This four-month leadership election can’t be just a debate about the future of our party as some have suggested. It has to be a debate about the future of our country.‎

I’m in politics to make change happen. Because I believe we are an incredible country, capable of achieving anything when we put our minds to it and pull together.

And when we’re determined, together we’re unstoppable.

 

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  • Balls.

    • Ian

      Don’t you mean “Ed Balls”?

      That was last month anyway.

  • Matthew Blott

    Hmm. Think I’d prefer her to Burnham. I didn’t think she’d have much chance but she could get a lot of second preferences as the Stop Burnham candidate.

    • Marco

      I’m all for stopping Burnham, but I can’t see that there’s much difference between them. They’re both very tainted by the Ed M connection too. I have a lot of respect for both of them in their way, but neither of them really seem like they can propel Labour to success and lead this difficult period of hard thinking. We will see!

      • Doug Smith

        “both very tainted by the Ed M connection”

        Quite right.

        Better to have someone more closely associated with Blairite success. Perhaps Jim Murphy could be parachuted into a safe seat. Surely a less talented Blairite would volunteer to step down to make way for him?

        Or perhaps not.

  • NT86

    Not unexpected. But many sections of the press will remind us of who her spouse is and possibly that she’s a career politician.

    • DangerousK88

      Rather that than Mid Staffs. Who isn’t a career politician?

      • Jonathan

        Dan Jarvis.

  • Marco

    She doesn’t concede much in this speech – she seems to suggest that the Ed M campaign was just fine, but not enough people were convinced that ‘we have the answers’. Hmm. She sounds quite Ed Miliband-ish, sort of reheated Ed. It’s not a very exacting or bold response to the moment, as far as I can see. But let’s see what happens. Early days, and all that.

    • Bah Humbug

      Smart people keep their powder dry for as long as possible. I suspect Yvette Cooper will take an “evolution not revolution” approach to change, when setting out her leadership stall … and her not bashing Miliband in her opening pitch sets her apart from some of the other (emerging) contenders, who couldn’t get the knife in quick enough (whether it was warranted or not).

  • BillFrancisOConnor

    She’ll be a disaster!

    • Boy Charioteer

      Any thoughts on any positive aspects of the candidates?

  • Marco

    Politicians who say ‘families’ when they mean ‘people’ just make me sick. Stop it Yvette!

    • Paul Richardson

      Here here!
      Thats said at least she has moved on from only the families who are hard working!

      • Peter Colledge

        It’s Hear Hear! But agree with your comment.

  • 5moreyears

    As a Labour Party member have to say I’m disappointed with all the candidates so far… we need some fresh faces and ideas not Blair/Brown all over again.Where are the new generation?

    • BillFrancisOConnor

      Biding their time and waiting until after what looks like an inevitable defeat in 2020.

      Sorry but I’m still reeling from last week’s catastrophe. I can’t see any way out of this mess anytime soon.

      • 5moreyears

        All is not lost.Cameron has battles ahead with Europe and Scotland.We need to start the fightback with some new faces and appeal to a wider audience while appearing at least human and not clones of whats been before.

        • BillFrancisOConnor

          I don’t agree with Chuka about much but he said we need to win 90 seats and he’s right. Where the hell are those 90 seats going to come from?

          There’s a time and a place to take political protest to the street and in my view that time is now>

          • Dave Postles

            20th June it is then?

          • BillFrancisOConnor

            Yes, I shall be at that demo.

          • Steve Stubbs

            In a legal peaceful protest no doubt?

      • Ian

        I have to agree with you. I think the best we can hope for is someone who will regain us some credibility and seats in Scotland and shore up what looks like a very unstable situation in the North of England. I suppose theres still Wales, but even there we didn’t do brilliantly. I think we have to choose someone who can do this and hope that in the interim a better successor will arise. “Biding their time” is right, but realistically other than Jarvis who else is there at present?

  • DangerousK88

    Cameron has a majority of 12, that is less than John Major, with the Lib Dems he had a majority of 60-70. It’ll be incredibly difficult to govern for him as he doesn’t have the cushion there anymore. Second of all the Tories do not have a majority in the House of Lords.

    My dad who is a Tory voter see’s Cooper as a formiddable opponent to Cameron. Burnham wouldn’t win it despite his NHS passion. The Tories would bring up Mid Staffs, with Cooper all they have in their armoury would be that she is married to Ed Balls and her taste in men, the Mid Staffs barbs would be more damaging.

    I back Yvette Cooper.

    • Jonathan

      The ‘middle England’ factor is important here. The Tory-leaning swing voters of Middle England might actually grow to like Yvette. Sadly, I can’t imagine them ever growing to like Andy or Chuka.

      • Jape

        I do wonder sometimes if people are talking geographically or about class (or both) when they say Middle England in relation to Labour. Our vote held amongst the middle class this election, it dropped quite a bit amongst C2s and DEs in 2010 and 2015, who don’t all just live in Salford and Scarborough or vote UKIP out of anger. But then that’s the odd thing about all the “aspiration” talk, the candidates are saying the better off are the aspirational (“talking to Aldi but not John Lewis”). There’s a big chunk of working-class voters in the Midlands and South-East who want to be John Lewis shopping homeowners. Many of them, feeling ignored during the election were attracted to Cameron’s ‘optimistic’ shall we say, rhetoric rather than Miliband’s calls to protect the worst off – because who wants to be the worst off?

        Now maybe the candidates are playing psychology, referring to the “aspirational” middle class (who on average have already done quite well) when they mean the working-class people who want to be middle-class but it seems a pretty round about way to do it.

        The main thing I hope for in this contest is that we don’t decide on some cookie cutter strategy – that to admit the need for a more centrist platform we’ll pretend the last five years never happened. Let’s not forget Ed chickened out on rail and utilities nationalisation despite their popularity. People support such measure not out of socialist dogma but because they feel turning key infrastructure into a market creates an unstable situation in their day to day lives – better a public service.

        There’s nothing to stop combining such apparently Bennite policies with ideas like a serious cut in VAT, which is pro-consumer, pro-business and weakens a regressive tax, and reform of the civil service to make major savings or whatever “Blairite” ideas might crop up.

        The point is to provide basic life security and the ability to progress in life. Have clear central message and use the policies that make the most sense, regardless of the apparent Party wing they appear from.

    • Peter Colledge

      I back Liz Kendall.

      • There’s a long way to go, and we need to hear a lot more from all of them. But Liz is the most impressive so far. Thoughtful, not knowing all the answers, not trotting out the same old lines and not just being sentimental about Labour.

        • Peter Colledge

          Thanks for this, Carl. I thought she was impressive last night on Newsnight.

          • ColinAdkins

            Peter and Carl, I know these things are subjective but I thought she was poor particularly on the top rate of tax. If she doesn’t respond well under the pressure of Davies who knows who will help her when it comes to PMQT. On the plus side she is relatively jargon free and does speak human. Colin

          • I know what you mean; but the “write your 2020 manifesto now” questions Evan Davies put to her were a bit silly, and she was right to try to stop him. She might have put it more strongly, but “I don’t know the answers” was a good response, I thought – straightforward rather than evasive.

          • NewForestRadical

            Mentioned it above but bears repeating: where was her criticism of the standard line on the benefit cap ie housing benefit wouldn’t be so high if private rents were lower!!?

        • Jape

          She is also ‘normal’ and unlike Burnham can talk confidently about the NHS without anything like MidStaffs hanging round her neck.

        • Absolutely agree with your points, Carl. Liz Kendall has the vision that’s needed.

  • Alecto

    I fear it may be on to another defeat if any of these four are leader. We need someone who isn’t a career politician, is relatable and means what they says. I don’t buy into the ‘we must move left/right’ arguments; don’t think the policy platform was the problem. Humans can instinctively tell when someone’s being insincere, and we don’t like it. Farage’s great strength is that he means what he says, and sounds/looks like a real human being. All of the current candidates are a mix of typical insincere politicians, and ‘never had a real job in their lives’ types.

    • DangerousK88

      Farage has risked turning UKIP into a joke by not going, and now Carswell is looking for a way out. I think there will be more problems for UKIP. All politicians today are career politicians, Dan Jarvis has ruled himself out because he is a single dad and isn’t prepared for it, fair enough.

      • Alecto

        A fair point that I hope the other parties will be able to capitalise on. Mustn’t squander chances to show UKIP as just as politicking as the rest.

        • DangerousK88

          Indeed, I was very surprised Suzanne Evans wasn’t put in as leader, UKIP sure, but very good in terms of communicating and leadership.

      • Patrick Nelson

        Farage and co. already did that long ago, but people will still vote for them as long as they are the only ones saying certain populist things.

    • Matthew Blott

      You’ll struggle to find any party leader of a mainstream party anywhere in the western world who isn’t a career politician.

      • luckydipper

        Quite. And a career Tory politician would run rings round someone like that–would just make them look bumbling and amateurish.

      • Alecto

        I’m still holding a candle out for Dan Jarvis. Just someone who had a down-to-earth career before politics, please!

        • DangerousK88

          Not going to happen, he is a single dad, quite rightly not prepared to put his kids through it.

          • Alecto

            Yes it’s all fair enough, but quite sad both that he’s ruled out, and that there’s no-one else with similar qualities!

      • Sugarcube

        I agree, and actually we want them to lead the nation – we should expect that they are career politicians. Personally its naïve to think otherwise. Even at local Cllr level it can be tough, harsh and cutthroat. The tougher, more focussed the better for me really.

  • luckydipper

    Her message is not distinctive enough. It’s ‘hope and togetherness’–but Umunna is saying, and will be identified with, ‘let’s pitch for the New Labour voters’ and Burnham saying, ‘let’s not move too far from our northern working-class base’. The danger for Yvette Cooper, who to me is the most intelligent experienced candidate, is that she gets squeezed in between those two. She has support in the PLP but what can she say that’s sharper and more convincing to the membership?

    • Alecto

      ‘Burnham saying, ‘let’s not move too far from our northern working-class base”

      Is he? Doesn’t seem to have said much of anything yet. That’s a fair guess of what he might say, but I’ve not heard him say it yet.

      If he does say it, I think he’ll have a point. We mustn’t be complacent about what happened in Scotland happening in North of England. It’d take longer and be less singularly dramatic, but nonetheless more devastating.

  • Sunny Jim

    I think she’d be a steady hand but not particularly passionate.

    She’s always seemed a bit of a cold fish to me but maybe the leadership would change that.

    • DangerousK88

      Leadership changes everybody, despite the result Ed Miliband certainly did improve towards the end. Problem with Ed, he started to sound very robotic towards the end, that daft note from Liam Byrne too.

      • Sunny Jim

        I would agree with that.

        He was diabolical for the first 18 months but improved hugely. Just a pity those advising him didn’t do a better job.

        • Paul Richardson

          So what we require is a list of each candidate’s advisers as well as their manifesto.

          • Ian

            I think what we require is no tolerance of sloppy briefings and unprepared interviews. If advisors don’t advise properly they shouldn’t get a second chance.

      • It wasn’t a daft note. It was the kind of teasing private note ministers have left for their successors for years (going by the biographies I’ve read). It’s just that until now no incoming politician’s been personally nasty enough to use them against the writer in such a shameless, career-destroying way. A bit more humanity extracted from politics.

        I might have felt sorry for David Laws over the difficulties he had about his private life and expenses – except that he was so ruthless about exposing this private joke.

  • JayUKChelsea

    Yeah, Ed wanted to make things better – thats a given?!?! whats new? Didnt see you much in debates, pressing ideas, just the structured responses – will listen tho

  • JayUKChelsea

    Come on people – something new please – this sounds a bit same old same old – lovely, I would vote for it, i voted Labour, but not me you need to talk to as well??

    • DangerousK88

      You’re not going to get EXACTLY what you want in things like this. All the Tories would have on Cooper is her taste in men, with Burnham they’d have Mid Staffs. Chuka they’d have the ‘trash’ comment, and a Blairite. Kendall also a Blairite.

  • returner

    Thinking of match-ups in 2020 — she’s done well shadowing May, and she’s got a certain gravitas which might put Boris’s bumbling act in the shade.

    And in the Mirror article above she avoided the “aspiration” buzz-word, which is a plus. My favourite candidate so far, with the least baggage.

    • DangerousK88

      This, least baggage can’t be emphasised enough.

      • Alecto

        It’s not the most thrilling or inspiring basis for a leadership, though.

        • She has *least* baggage? Of the four declared runners? Come off it.

          • returner

            The Sun etc will never let Chuka forget he (twice) called ordinary people “trash”. Think what they did to Emily T over a neutrally captioned twitter picture of a house. Now multiply it by a 100.

  • Bill Filey

    Will that be all families, working families or only hard-working families? I need to know.

    • Alecto

      None of them seem particularly on board with Angela Eagle’s point about focus-grouped-to-death phrases yet. Doesn’t bode well.

      • Doug Smith

        How else are MPs to know what the voters think. Labour’s elite are out of touch. Many constituency parties are moribund, including some in the 100 target constituencies – so there’s little feedback from those at the base of the party.

        The never-had-a-proper-job careerist politicians can only rely on focus groups or never-had-a-proper-job ‘communications consultants’ who want to become careerist MPs.

    • wolfman

      The usual politico speak…………..I imagine If you’re married without children or single does she want you to vote Tory ??…

      She’s bland…She’s like a robot and she’s all wrong in a media age !!.

    • Demongo

      I believe it only applies to families of 2 MPs (or Ex MPs) who triple-flipped their second home 3 times in a 24 month period in order to claim massive expenses. That’s hard work.

  • Kenneth Watson

    not sure she sees or can concede that the SNP fought a hugely impressive campaign on progressive issues ,that Nicola Surgeon caught the public imagination with that same boldness she recommends and ran rings around all of them …that is what the result totally says!

  • Ross Gillon

    Positive. But we must get away from stating that ‘left’ and ‘right’ does not matter. That sounds too much like new labour which won’t win back votes lost in Scotland.

  • DangerousK88

    Yvette is getting cross party support, even from the SNP voters on social media, she’s the one I back.

    • Jimmy Sands

      Based on her remarks I agree if I supported an opposing party, she’s the one I’d want.

    • Matthew Blott

      Social media eh? Yeah that’s a great guide for the political weather.

  • Dan

    I feel she is the only candidate who the electorate will see as a credible PM and capable of “standing up to Putin” (which matters more than we might like).

    Torn between my head saying Yvette and my heart saying Andy.

    • Dave Postles

      “standing up to Putin”
      Centrica has just agreed another deal with GazProm.

  • Daniel Speight

    Seems to me Yvette that what the party doesn’t need is another Oxbridge PPE as leader. More than that, it could probably do without someone that has never done a real job outside politics and got into some early political jobs because of her father’s connections.

    • Boy Charioteer

      Any suggestions?

      • Daniel Speight

        Yes, the guy who doesn’t want it, Alan Johnson.

        • Boy Charioteer

          My old union boss.

  • Ken Burch

    As opposed to the other leadership candidates, who want to make life hellish for them?

    • Jimmy Sands

      It’s the sort of edgy blue sky thinking we need. As a rule of thumb, if your speech sounds like a Thick Of It script then bin it. Still, she was rude about Blair, so that’s the Unite endorsement in the bag.

      • Ken Burch

        Blue sky has an edge now?

  • Stanvax

    The next leader is going to have to kill some sacred cows to convince voters that Labour represents the future. This will need big ideas, that are radical and not defensive at their heart (there was too much emphasis on protection of the status quo, NHS/Pensions – in the last manifesto, nowhere near enough on designing the future).

    Labour has a major advantage, When it wants to appear modern, it can look so much more appealing than the conservatives, who are even hindered by their name/demographics

    50 years on, we are at another “A new Britain forged in the white heat of scientific revolution” moment, There needs to be a commitment to making the UK the innovation capital of the world, with radical incentives to drive this. There needs to be radical modernisation of the public sector (where the level of waste in comparison to the private sector is unsustainable, unpalatable but true) and there needs to be a commitment to a new political settlement with real local power

    • ColinAdkins

      Stanvax you have earned my nomination come on down.

    • Patrick Nelson

      Protecting the NHS and state pensions are though two of the very most important political issues that we face in Britain.

      • Stanvax

        They are, and they should be defended, but they should not be a main pillar of the vision taken to the country in an election. I think voters want to hear about innovation, ideas, radical reform not defending the status quo (protect the NHS etc). Its hard to get excited about a manifesto that just defends what we currently have. Labour has to be more ambitious than this and start articulating the future

        • Patrick Nelson

          Yes, good point, but I think Ed Miliband was trying to get that sort of message across as well. Only it was like no one was listening.

          • Stanvax

            I am thinking much bigger ideas, Like it or not most of the big ideas HS2, Northern Powerhouse come from the Tories, they even talk about Full Employment. Labour needs its own set of great big societally changing big ideas – where are they?

  • Keir Softie

    Whoever we choose we must not move to the right. Ignore the Blairite calls. If we are not true to our roots then what are we for?

    • RWP

      All very well, but places like North Warwickshire (number 1 on the target list) were lost not because Labour was too right wing, but because it was seen as an economic risk.

      • Dan

        And Labour is always going to be seen as an economic risk no matter how far to the right they move. The only way to combat it is to get enough positive reasons for people to vote Labour to make people feel it’s worth taking the risk.

        • RWP

          Well that wasn’t the case during most of the Blair era, when Labour was actually rated far higher on economic competence than the Tories.

          • Dan

            Actually, even in 1997, Blair was seen as less economically competent than Major.

          • RWP

            Disagree – Labour had a significant lead on economic competence from 1992 to around 2007.

          • Dan

            In the final IPSOS-MORI before the ’97 election, Labour trailed the Tories on economic competence. Plus focus groups picked up worries about whether the economy was “safe in Labour’s hands”. It was countered by the many positive reasons for voting Labour (extra spending on public services, Blair, kick out the tired and sleazy Tories) which made people feel it was worth the risk.

    • Let’s just keep losing gloriously, and each time dedicate our defeats to the memory of Keir Hardie.

  • Carole

    Labour politicians need to stop concentrating on sound-bites about families. Yes most people are part of a family, whether hard-working or otherwise, but it sounds exclusive to people who don’t feel part of a family.

    • I agree. And even for those with families, it’s just too well-worn and clichéd. We need to move on in language, as well as policy and strategy.

      • returner

        Agreed, “hard-working families” is 20 years old now. Whoever becomes next leader needs to start with fresh, everyday, language.

  • RWP

    It’s her or Burnham for me.

    • Why?

      • RWP

        Because we need a well-known name, someone with gravitas but who also seems like a real person, someone with experience, someone with ideas based in reality, someone the public will like, a big hitter. There are the only 2 candidates to tick these boxes.

        • imw101

          “someone with gravitas but who also seems like a real person,’

          Funniest oxymoron since “military intelligence”

  • Keir Softie

    Hard working families? What about unemployed single people? Do they have no voice in the modern party? People can be unemployed for many reasons, through no fault of trying.

    • Kev

      Good point but don’t forget we live in a society that is seemingly content to demonise the unemployed. Look at the ‘freak show’ tv programmes that litter our airwaves. Does anybody know the actual figure of unemployment in this country? Call me cynical (lol) but I don’t believe the government figures!

      • imw101

        “Does anybody know the actual figure of unemployment in this country?”

        756,891

        • Kev

          Lol

  • swatnan

    Should be a straight fight between Chukka Yvette and Burnham.
    The only credentials and proof we should insist on is that their grandparents were working class and had grown up on a council estate. On 2nd thoughts that might rule out Chukka my preferred candidate, so lets waive that rule.

  • David Callam

    The right-wing press will have a field day, painting the shadow cabinet as Mrs Balls’ boys and linking her to her unpopular husband at every opportunity.
    It may be unfair, but it’s real life.

    • Johnny Foreigner

      Errrrrr, it could also be true.

  • David Pickering

    “The Tories don’t have any of the answers for Britain’s future. All they will do is divide us, holding families back, widening inequality, helping only the richest in the country while everyone else gets left behind.”

    Did Ed Miliband write her announcement? Yvette Cooper always struck me as talented, but overshadowed by her husband. I expected better from her.

    • imw101

      Yes – only seven days in and NHS hospitals have closed, Aston Martin sales have gone sky-high, families have been broken up, actual civil war has broken out, and queues of the damned and hopeless are now stretching back miles from Beachy Head.

      It’s like ISIS has come to town.

      :ROLLSEYES:

  • wolfman

    The day after the election all these contenders seem to know why Labour lost !!..

    Amazing that !!.

  • Sugarcube

    Amazing lack of understanding of the electorate. She’s the wife to Ed Balls, the press will have a field day and I don’t think the public will warm to that at all. Woeful.

    • Boy Charioteer

      Once again, does anyone have any positive things to say about any of the candidates? Some are either too tainted with being “Metro Centric Elite” whatever that is. Others have a funny Northern accent and will be associated with Mid Staffs. Some were just married to the wrong people. Dan Jarvis seemed to “tick all the boxes”, but he is gone. I despair at all the negativity on here. Tories must be lapping it up.

      • Johnny Foreigner

        Haven’t you just made the very point, there is no one, so everyone pecks at the rest. You also know what is meant by Metro Cen………….. Look north, beyond the capital, talent should be sought for, countrywide.

        • Boy Charioteer

          I truly hope that you are right.

    • Martinete

      This is all people can resort to when it comes to Yvette.

    • returner

      re: the press having a field day — I can’t see (yet) how her husband would be that damaging on the front page of the Sun.

      Compared to what they could splash with about Chuka (“This man thinks YOU’RE trash”) I can’t see the Yvette/Balls headlines so clearly.

      • imw101

        “I can’t see (yet) how her husband would be that damaging on the front page of the Sun”

        You can’t??? Well I am considerably less talented than the subs on the Sun, but here are a few off the top of my head:

        “Ed’s Mini Cooper Crashes Out”
        “Yvette Drops Balls”
        “Can we trust Ed’s cheque mate?”

        You get the idea …

        • returner

          Ha, excellent work!

          I suppose my position is: yes, they’ll use Balls as ammunition to attack her with. but the attacks won’t be resonant enough to cause a major problem, especially by 2020.

  • Graeme68

    Well done Yvette for stating a clear break with the Blair/Brown mindset. I liked what you had to say, despite the politico-speak that hems in the majority of politicians these days in the media spotlight. I expect the language to loosen up in the coming weeks but you’re certainly a favourite for me.

    • Strange. I’m not against her, and she may turn out to be worth backing. But what she said in her Mirror article sounded very Brownian and very much like politico-speak. That’s what worries me about her.

  • Monkey_Bach

    No. Eeek.

    • Sugarcube

      Spot On Monkey_Bach, vapid – what a brilliant and perfect description.

    • Peter Colledge

      Absolutely agree. We need a Leicester MP, someone to bring the Midlands back into the fold. Support Liz Kendall.

      • Martinete

        Blairite.

      • ColinAdkins

        Not after yesterday’s performance on Newsnight.

        • Sylvia

          For the first time ever I think Evan Davis just gave up. He’s usually a hard interrogator but not with Kendall. She was absolutely useless & I hate to say this about another woman but she was trying to be very “feminim” & not succeeding.

          • Peter Colledge

            ‘absolutely useless’…could you elaborate? And trying to be feminine? And NewForestRadical, how was she giving up on the poor. I can understand a debate about her, but would like some specifics, if possible. OK, if you want to vote for someone else; I have no problem with that. But we have a debate here, and something good might come out of it. Unless she’s beyond the pale; remember Blair, the man who won three elections; do we ditch everything he stood for and try a different tack?

      • NewForestRadical

        Well, I have just watched her interview on Newsnight and she has lost my vote! Floundered awfully on the ‘benefit cap’, making no attempt to contextualise high levels of household benefit receipt in relation to low wages and private sector rents. Implicitly accepted the right-wing tabloid line on ‘welfare scroungers’ etc. Arrggghhhh! Sure, there might be votes in that but if Labour completely abandons the poor it might as well not exist!!

    • BillFrancisOConnor

      ‘Labour needs somebody combative, inventive and intelligent, with a winning personality, who can convey complex ideas in plain English in terms understandable by the man and woman in the street’.

      Like who?

      Not Sarah Teather please!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    • ColinAdkins

      I agree with the jist of what you are saying but I think you have put it too strongly and is a tad unfair as a result.

    • Johnny Foreigner

      Monkey you are right, trouble is, she’s very televisual, handles interviewers well, but is instantly forgettable.

  • David Powell

    So far the arguments seem like reruns of somewhat stale ideas, in somewhat stale language: concerns about how to get power, or alternatively being true to ideals, and remain in the wilderness. I hoped when I joined the labour party the truth had dawned, that as a social DEMOCRATIC party we should be on the side of empowering enthusing, inspiring, the people, our people, – yet I fear the Party is still concerned most with office taking, and swapping power with the Tories; i.e. putting institutional success, and preservation of the party, ahead of focusing on values ideals and understandings, and equiping the party to serve the prospering of those values ideals and understandings. Brief flirtation with community rooted campaigning seems to have petered out. I wonder the extent to which the enthusiasm, idealism and warm solidarity of those many thousands who campaigned with no possibility of personal gain, will be rewarded with real attention to their values and asirations, as diverse as they may be. Above all I’m disappointed that amongst all the talk of fairness, equality and empowerment, there remains a stultifing reluctance of those given office, at every level, by a rotten electoral system to stand up for constitutional reform and renewal. The illegitimacy of our system is obvious. By not tackling that when we had power, we guaranteed 10 years of extremist rule during which the slim last vestiges of public service institutions and values have been and will be savaged, malign press barons will ensure leaving the European Union with scant discussion of the fundamental political and social reasons for its foundation in the debris of European civil wars , and the chance of legitimate constitutionasl change nullified. Our corrupt political process corrupts us, we do not advocate political reform that empowers electors. The result is our enthusiastic voters in shire constituencies are utterly disenfranchised. Worse, the presumption that our urban voters willl always vote for us, led to complacency and failure to refresh and renew, – in the end not good for us, and the system that ensured we would be first or second, ensured we were wiped out in Scotland, There is a chance that PR will prevent total annihilation in the Scottish election in 2016. If we had won with a 35% strategy (maybe less than 25% of the electorate, how could we honestly say we had any legitimacy? I certainly do not accept that the present government has any legitimacy whatever. Many of the diverse values and understanding our Labour coalition holds are held by other progressive, inside and outside the party tents. If we really want to change our country, we should recognise the imperative need for huge constitutional change, collaborate with others against a seriously dangerous right to achieve a more legitimate system. Maybe a party which seemed to genuinely promote the interests of voters against presumed party interests would gain the respect of voters?…. Maybe we democratise our structures whilst we are at it???

  • bobby brown

    No way! we would never win with her as leader

  • Boy Charioteer

    Please somebody say something positive about some of the candidates please. Before I leap out of the upstairs window screaming

    • Sugarcube

      Tons of positives have been stated for Andy Burnham, who may be my favourite at this stage. I personally don’t have a problem with Chukka, I like him. Its early days, the leadership contest is just beginning so people will have time to decide and of course vote.

    • imw101

      They are all sh …

      Mind how you go

  • Graeme68

    I’ll say it again. I think Yvette Cooper would make a good leader of the Labour Party. The fact that she is married to Ed Balls is quite frankly neither here nor there. The right wing press will attack her regardless and if we are to be influenced by what is favourable to Fleet Street then we may as well give up now.
    The focus should be on the programme that is being offered: what the party needs is a bold, brave, progressive and inclusive approach, with compassion at its core. The “electorate” are like a fluid mosaic and not a fixed body that must be appeased to the tune of the press barons. This is a time for the Labour Party to be courageous and stand by the ideals of equality on which it was founded. Those who call for a return to the centre ground are those with a woeful understanding of what is lacking. This is no time for timidity but certainly a time for reflection. I think that Yvette Cooper is the right person for the job.

  • Sugarcube

    Everyone is entitled to their opinion of course.
    Here is mine, again. I think its very relevant that she is married to Ed Balls actually, as that will detract from any effective campaigning and is poorly judged.
    Personally, I think she is far from being the right person for the job. I haven’t seen anything progressive from Yvette Cooper, that said, if she has something interesting to say, now is her chance.

  • Johnny Foreigner

    She and Burnham, will if elected, change absolutely nothing for the better

    • Demongo

      “She and Burnham, will if elected, change absolutely nothing”

      FTFY

      • Johnny Foreigner

        Ouchy.

  • wolfman

    Let’s go to the right of the Tories…..If we win we’ll still be called The Labour Party..

  • To be fair, I think both Liz and Chuka are trying to move on from “the good old NHS and hard-working families” stuff. The question for me so far is whether either of them can develop a new sort of thinking seriously, and make it seem potentially appealing to the whole country.

  • ColinAdkins

    Another leadership election contest and once again no diversity candidate. Last time five candidates from the Oxbridge lodge and this four and counting.

    • imw101

      Fear not – the lovely Ms Abbott will be along before you can say ‘affirmative action’

  • vec

    Same old drivel. The public won’t fall for insincere, patronising claptrap from champagne socialists again so give it a rest Mrs Balls.

    • Chris B

      Here’s a hint. Want people to take you seriously? Change your avatar!

    • DangerousK88

      UKIP lol O’Flynn put the nail in your parties coffin today.

    • Fred Worthy

      Hows the ukip civil war going,by the way, the public didn’t fall for the creepy but obvious racial rants from the loony right, see you in oblivion then.

  • Harry Barnes

    If the choice is between Liz Kendell, Chuka Umuna, Andy Burnham and Yvette Cooper could we please have a category on the ballot papers for “None Of The Above”?

  • Fred Worthy

    I like Cooper, but I can’t make my mind up yet, I will have to wait till they have put forward their idea’s, I was hoping that someone with a fresh approach would appear, still lets see what transpires.Anyway i’m off to another page, too many ukip rabids on this one,disease and pestilence invades infects their being, Yuk

    • Harry Barnes

      A means of getting them to put their ideas forward is to require them to publish “Manifestos of Intent”. We can then give these our assessment and vote for the one who is the least inadequate.

  • George Dunning

    Would hope Liz Kendall stood a chance, appears not at 16-1.

  • imw101

    “we convinced all people in all parts of the country that we had no answers to match up with their ambitions.”

    Fixed that for you

  • Old Radical

    Looking at the leadership candidates as applicants for a conventional job you would expect to see relevant qualifications and experience. Cooper holds a degree in economics and has serious ministerial experience. I see other candidates who lack relevant qualifications and experience saying they will “put together a team” presumably to delegate the difficult work to but you can’t put together the right team unless you understand the economics and are sufficiently numerate plus you must have solid ministerial experience.

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