The Omnishambles continues – this time it’s jobs

11th May, 2012 11:14 am

When the Regional Growth Fund was unveiled Nick Clegg claimed that it would create 500,000 new jobs. Yet a scathing report from the National Audit Office says that it will only create 41,000 jobs. As Chuka Umunna said this morning:

“While Nick Clegg said the Fund would lead to half a million jobs, the report forecasts that it will create only up to 41,000 jobs, and many of them would have been created in any event without the RGF.”

Why don’t we look at the difference between those two numbers as a graph:

Under the RGF the cost per job is £33,000 – under Labour’s Future Jobs Fund (described by Cameron as as “expensive”), the cost per job was just £6,500.

  • https://mikestallard.virtualgallery.com/ Mike Stallard

    Regional development is a brainchild of the EU. It is designed to get rid of the nationalities which, they think, cause wars and to replace them with regional government under the EU.
    John Prescott tried to introduce this EU measure in vain in his own area.

    Nick Clegg and his prosperous EU wife are failing in this because we, in UK are not about to undo centuries of hard won unity and to hand our country over to continental government.

    • trotters1957

      Regional development funding has been a feature of all post war governments, and rightly so.

      If we weren’t in the EU we would still need regional funding.

      Attack the EU by all means but at least get your facts straight.

      • treborc1

         Regional development is a brainchild of the EU.

        I thought it started in the 1930 during the great recession down turn and it carried on  after ww2

        • ROB SHEFFIELD

          Regional Development is a brainchild of centrist keynesian economics: and long may it continue.

          • https://mikestallard.virtualgallery.com/ Mike Stallard

            The advantages of Regional Government are that they employ a lot more civil servants and give a lot more employment. They are nearer the grass roots, too, than national government. And they are bigger than the counties which are pretty small really.
            However, with the EU proposals, the County and District Councils would still be in place. So would the four national parliaments. They just add another layer of officials.

            The EU wants them, of course, to stamp out nationalism. By dealing with regions, they can divide big nations up and control each region much more effectively. Divide et impera!

            (PS actually they are the brainchild of Monnet following his socialist star0>

          • treborc1

             Well whom ever started it’s helping us in Wales and if it splits the country, well that’s been happening for years

          • https://mikestallard.virtualgallery.com/ Mike Stallard

            Well, it all depends really on how much you trust the Commissioners of the EU. If they turn sour, then tiny little Wales isn’t going to be much of a shelter compared with the United Kingdom is it? 

          • treborc1

            It’s so tiny you lot could not stay out

          • https://mikestallard.virtualgallery.com/ Mike Stallard

            You lot?
            I assume you are referring to the Anglo Saxon invasion of Brittannia c. 510 a.d.?
            Or maybe the Premiership of Lloyd George? Or the Tudor monarchy?

          • treborc1

             Wellof course the Tudors are welsh so it was an invasion of the English

          • https://mikestallard.virtualgallery.com/ Mike Stallard

            Your picture looks like that of Aneurin Bevan – is this deliberate? He was another Welshman who did very well out of the Union too.

          • treborc1

             I did as well £86,000 compensation for my accident, good old Unions

    • Brumanuensis

      You know what. You’re right. However, I for one welcome our new EU overlords.

  • Quiet_Sceptic

    It looks appalling value and it leaves the tax-payer with little to show for their money.

    At least if you sink £1.4bn into social housing you generate jobs (typically 2 per house?), you help alleviate the national housing shortage and you have £1.4bn of housing assets on the balance sheet to off-set the debt.

    You even have the option at a future date of selling the houses to pay-back the debt incurred in building them. If you don’t throw away tax-payers money on discounts to buy the votes of the current occupiers then over a reasonable period the government would probably make a good return. A form of self-financing fiscal stimulus.

    • Alexwilliamz

      You could also incorporate the requirement to offer a certain proportion/number of apprenticeships as part of the deal. This just seems such a no brainer I can only assume there is vested interests at work, either that or the fear that a mass house building programme will cause a massive drop in house prices??

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