Has the Labour Party changed? And how?

September 19, 2012 2:00 pm

In the last State of the Party survey, we asked you in the party had changed (politically, organisationally or both) since May 2010.

There seems to be a consensus that the party has changed with around 50% of respondents saying that they believe the party has changed politically since the last election, while just over 40% of those who voted believe the party has changed organisationally over the same period. Just short of 30% of respondents agreed with both statements and believe that the party has changed across the board. In total around 60% of readers believe that the party has changed either politically or organisationally since 2010.

However there is still a highly sceptical element amongst LabourList readers – almost 30% of you believe that there has been no real change politically or organisationally since 2010.

The message for the Labour leadership is that political change seems to be more noticeable – or notable – than organisational change, and that whilst a significant percentage of LabourList readers believe that the party is changing, it’s by no means an overwhelming majority.

And if our readers aren’t entirely convinced yet, then there’s a huge distance to go before the public will accept that Labour is different to the party they rejected so decisively in 2010.

Another task for the conference speech Ed – no pressure…

  • http://twitter.com/NewhamSue Newham Sue

    Hi Mark, Think the problem is – and so many people I speak to on twitter agree on this – that the changes in the party structure (Refounding Labour, +1 campaign, involvement with Movement For Change etc) will take a while to filter down and show fruit, and it’s just too early to see whether the party will stay the course and see the job through to creating the party we’d like to see again – higher membership levels/ a better reflection of the community/ a better reflection of different areas of the jobs market/ a balance away from ‘The political class’.

    In the meantime it feels as though we have party who since Ed’s last speeches on banking morality, won’t offer anything more than opposition based on nit-picking practicalities as opposed to anything more substantially political til Jon Cruddas and co. report back. 

    When I was filling out the state of the party survey  this month, I was aware that it really felt too early to comment on whether there had been substantive or political changes in the nature of the party. I feel we’re moving in the right direction, making the right noises and that it’s right we’re thinking through our political responses to hopefully come up with a long-term effective political strategy of substance, but what the future holds, who knows. I guess I’m just hoping for a postive change.

  • Pallof

    I feel that the party is changing at National level through the personality and leadership of Ed but that change is being resisted at local level. The ‘Refounding Labour’ exercise did not help as it essentially gave the message that local parties can do what they want to obtain the result they want. In some cases that result is to maintain or strengthen the same exclusive structures they have had for years. 

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