Has the Labour Party changed? And how?

September 19, 2012 2:00 pm

In the last State of the Party survey, we asked you in the party had changed (politically, organisationally or both) since May 2010.

There seems to be a consensus that the party has changed with around 50% of respondents saying that they believe the party has changed politically since the last election, while just over 40% of those who voted believe the party has changed organisationally over the same period. Just short of 30% of respondents agreed with both statements and believe that the party has changed across the board. In total around 60% of readers believe that the party has changed either politically or organisationally since 2010.

However there is still a highly sceptical element amongst LabourList readers – almost 30% of you believe that there has been no real change politically or organisationally since 2010.

The message for the Labour leadership is that political change seems to be more noticeable – or notable – than organisational change, and that whilst a significant percentage of LabourList readers believe that the party is changing, it’s by no means an overwhelming majority.

And if our readers aren’t entirely convinced yet, then there’s a huge distance to go before the public will accept that Labour is different to the party they rejected so decisively in 2010.

Another task for the conference speech Ed – no pressure…

  • http://twitter.com/NewhamSue Newham Sue

    Hi Mark, Think the problem is – and so many people I speak to on twitter agree on this – that the changes in the party structure (Refounding Labour, +1 campaign, involvement with Movement For Change etc) will take a while to filter down and show fruit, and it’s just too early to see whether the party will stay the course and see the job through to creating the party we’d like to see again – higher membership levels/ a better reflection of the community/ a better reflection of different areas of the jobs market/ a balance away from ‘The political class’.

    In the meantime it feels as though we have party who since Ed’s last speeches on banking morality, won’t offer anything more than opposition based on nit-picking practicalities as opposed to anything more substantially political til Jon Cruddas and co. report back. 

    When I was filling out the state of the party survey  this month, I was aware that it really felt too early to comment on whether there had been substantive or political changes in the nature of the party. I feel we’re moving in the right direction, making the right noises and that it’s right we’re thinking through our political responses to hopefully come up with a long-term effective political strategy of substance, but what the future holds, who knows. I guess I’m just hoping for a postive change.

  • Pallof

    I feel that the party is changing at National level through the personality and leadership of Ed but that change is being resisted at local level. The ‘Refounding Labour’ exercise did not help as it essentially gave the message that local parties can do what they want to obtain the result they want. In some cases that result is to maintain or strengthen the same exclusive structures they have had for years. 

Latest

  • Comment Why rural areas need free buses

    Why rural areas need free buses

    To have a fully functioning society, bus services in rural areas should be free of charge. For young people seeking employment, education or entertainment, the unwell needing to visit and be visited in hospitals or the elderly wanting to break the loneliness of isolation, public transport is essential. If governments don’t want to spend money on services in rural areas, they should at least provide the means for people who live there to get to them in urban areas. Regular […]

    Read more →
  • News Austin Mitchell rubbishes claims that Labour MPs could join UKIP

    Austin Mitchell rubbishes claims that Labour MPs could join UKIP

    The idea that any Labour MPs could follow Douglas Carswell’s lead by joining UKIP is merely “wishful thinking” on their part, according to a prominent Eurosceptic Labour MP. Yesterday, Nigel Farage claimed that he has “spoken to many” Labour MPs this year who “support everything UKIP is trying to do”, while a UKIP source today told the BBC that as many as ten “deeply unhappy” Labour MPs who are “fed up with being patronised by the Labour glitterati” and would […]

    Read more →
  • Featured David Cameron only has himself to blame for his problems with UKIP

    David Cameron only has himself to blame for his problems with UKIP

    This week’s defection by Douglas Carswell to UKIP was a hammer blow for the Prime Minister’s authority.  David Cameron and the Tories are running scared of UKIP and are more divided than ever before. With Stuart Wheeler, the former Tory donor and now UKIP treasurer, declaring that at least two more MPs are “seriously considering” defecting, we know that the introspection and turmoil is set to continue. As the Tories’ identity crisis deepens, it becomes clearer and clearer that they cannot provide […]

    Read more →
  • Comment Rather than focusing on free schools, Labour should consider supporting home education

    Rather than focusing on free schools, Labour should consider supporting home education

    The Labour Party, since at least 2010 have gradually begun to present a coherent, cohesive education programme, to present to the electorate in time for the General Election in 2015. We’ve rightly focused on Michael Gove’s profligate waste of money on free schools. We’ve rightly focused on the Liberal Democrats’ breaking their pledge to vote against raising tuition fees. We’ve rightly focused on the other 50% of people who decide to not go to University and we’re now right to […]

    Read more →
  • Comment Attracting the anti-UKIP vote – why Clacton matters for Labour

    Attracting the anti-UKIP vote – why Clacton matters for Labour

    Make yourself a cuppa, pull up a comfy chair, and watch. Since Douglas Carswell’s surprise/no-surprise defection to UKIP yesterday and the forcing of a by-election in Clacton, there will be some in the party tempted to adopt this attitude. And not without good reason. Consider the previous by-election outings over the last year or so. In Eastleigh, a Liberal Democrat/Tory marginal, from nowhere, became a LD/UKIP marginal. The Conservatives were dumped into third place and our vote stagnated at just […]

    Read more →