The price of vanity: Nadine Dorries will cost the taxpayer at least £6158 while she’s on “I’m a celebrity”

November 6, 2012 11:47 am

The New Statesman reported earlier that Nadine Dorries will receive £5748 from the taxpayer while she’s recording “I’m a celebrity”.

In fact, it will be significantly higher.

Since March 2011 Dorries has sat on the “Panel of Chairs”, whose role is to “chair Public Bill Committees and other general committees.  They may also chair debates in Westminster Hall and act as temporary chairs of Committees of the whole House.”

As Dorries has been a member for over a year, she receives an additional £8166 per year on top of her salary, bringing it up to £73,904 per year.

That means Dorries is in fact costing the taxpayer the astonishing sum of at least £6158 in salary alone during her vanity exercise important MPs work on prime time TV.

Expenses could bring the total close to £10,000.

And to think she calls other people “out of touch”

  • uglyfatbloke

    great move by Dorries No doubt appearing in ‘I’m a celebrity…lock me up’  will help her gain a seat in the Scottish Parliament, same  as it did for George Galloway.

    • franwhi

      Galloway’s never had a seat in the Scottish Parliament. We choose our politicians for their service to constituents – not for their ego.

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100001102865655 John Ruddy

       Except it didnt. The people of Glasgow didnt elect him, presumably seeing him as a publicity seeking ego-maniac, which seemed to pass the people of Bradfor by when they elected him to sit in Westminster (or not!)

  • http://twitter.com/MediaGuido Media Guido

    The same as Gordon Brown and more entertaining.

  • uglyfatbloke

    That was kind of my point. If  Dorries can be consigned to well-deserved obscurity along with Galloway, so much the better. Now if we can just get Cameron, Osborne, Clegg, Miliband, Balls, May and Cooper to got to Australian and stay there…….

  • http://twitter.com/husedit quotes

    As a fairly staunch libertarian my main worry from this whole thing is that Ukip will take her. That would be a very worrying sign for the direction of the right wing in this country.

    The odd thing about her is that she represents the Tory core far, far more accurately than Osborne or Cameron – Cameron especially is a committed social democrat – and if Ukip accept her that would dash any hopes I hold for a fiscally “conservative” but socially liberal party to rise in this country.

    It’s a real shame that no matter which of the 3 main parties I vote for I’m forced to accept some form of interventionist authoritarianism.

  • AlanGiles
  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1634956121 Norrie Muir

    …reckon she’s worth the money, for her propensity to upset her own party…..
     

  • http://twitter.com/benjaminbutter Benjamin Butterworth

    She has, though, agreed to give this money to charity not take it home.

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