The price of vanity: Nadine Dorries will cost the taxpayer at least £6158 while she’s on “I’m a celebrity”

November 6, 2012 11:47 am

The New Statesman reported earlier that Nadine Dorries will receive £5748 from the taxpayer while she’s recording “I’m a celebrity”.

In fact, it will be significantly higher.

Since March 2011 Dorries has sat on the “Panel of Chairs”, whose role is to “chair Public Bill Committees and other general committees.  They may also chair debates in Westminster Hall and act as temporary chairs of Committees of the whole House.”

As Dorries has been a member for over a year, she receives an additional £8166 per year on top of her salary, bringing it up to £73,904 per year.

That means Dorries is in fact costing the taxpayer the astonishing sum of at least £6158 in salary alone during her vanity exercise important MPs work on prime time TV.

Expenses could bring the total close to £10,000.

And to think she calls other people “out of touch”

  • uglyfatbloke

    great move by Dorries No doubt appearing in ‘I’m a celebrity…lock me up’  will help her gain a seat in the Scottish Parliament, same  as it did for George Galloway.

    • franwhi

      Galloway’s never had a seat in the Scottish Parliament. We choose our politicians for their service to constituents – not for their ego.

    • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100001102865655 John Ruddy

       Except it didnt. The people of Glasgow didnt elect him, presumably seeing him as a publicity seeking ego-maniac, which seemed to pass the people of Bradfor by when they elected him to sit in Westminster (or not!)

  • http://twitter.com/MediaGuido Media Guido

    The same as Gordon Brown and more entertaining.

  • uglyfatbloke

    That was kind of my point. If  Dorries can be consigned to well-deserved obscurity along with Galloway, so much the better. Now if we can just get Cameron, Osborne, Clegg, Miliband, Balls, May and Cooper to got to Australian and stay there…….

  • http://twitter.com/husedit quotes

    As a fairly staunch libertarian my main worry from this whole thing is that Ukip will take her. That would be a very worrying sign for the direction of the right wing in this country.

    The odd thing about her is that she represents the Tory core far, far more accurately than Osborne or Cameron – Cameron especially is a committed social democrat – and if Ukip accept her that would dash any hopes I hold for a fiscally “conservative” but socially liberal party to rise in this country.

    It’s a real shame that no matter which of the 3 main parties I vote for I’m forced to accept some form of interventionist authoritarianism.

  • AlanGiles
  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1634956121 Norrie Muir

    …reckon she’s worth the money, for her propensity to upset her own party…..
     

  • http://twitter.com/benjaminbutter Benjamin Butterworth

    She has, though, agreed to give this money to charity not take it home.

Latest

  • Featured “Tory Welfare Waste” – why Reeves’ new attack line will cut through with voters

    “Tory Welfare Waste” – why Reeves’ new attack line will cut through with voters

    Rachel Reeves will make a speech today slamming the Tories’ handling of the welfare system, and will trial what looks like could potentially become a recurring line for Labour in the election run-up. “Tory Welfare Waste” is the takeaway line from today’s speech, and is likely to stick in the craw of the Tories, who have spent years trying to paint Labour as the party of profligate welfare spending. But annoying your opponents is not the only effective attack line. Fortunately, this […]

    Read more →
  • Featured 8 questions Iain Duncan-Smith must now answer

    8 questions Iain Duncan-Smith must now answer

    In November 2011 Iain Duncan Smith promised – one million people would be on Universal Credit by April 2014. Three years on fewer than 18,000 people are receiving Universal Credit. Despite over £600million being spent on the new benefit the programme is beset by chaos, waste and delays. This afternoon Iain Duncan Smith was forced to appear before the House of Commons to answer questions about this failing programme. But once again he refused to answer the simplest of questions about his […]

    Read more →
  • Comment They left us wanting more – Gordon Brown is only the latest big beast to depart

    They left us wanting more – Gordon Brown is only the latest big beast to depart

    “Always leave them wanting more.” It’s not entirely clear who said it first, but this has become one of the more popular, if rarely achieved, political clichés. Of all the recent political leaders we might have expected to stand aside with a clamour for more ringing in his ears, Gordon Brown would not have featured prominently in discussions. Brown’s Labour leadership culminated in the party’s second worst General Election performance in the post-war era. Although he opted to remain in […]

    Read more →
  • Comment Regional banks: a crucial ingredient to help small business

    Regional banks: a crucial ingredient to help small business

    On 19 November, I was at a meeting at the German Embassy with the head of the German Savings Banks Group, Sparkassen, Georg Fahrenschon. Herr Fahrenschon told us that local savings banks were the biggest single driver of economic resilience through the global financial crisis and in the recovery since. This was because of their support for small businesses, which are the backbone of the German economy. In the US, the economic recovery has been far stronger and more sustained […]

    Read more →
  • Comment To win back people’s trust, we need to be honest about what the limits of politics are

    To win back people’s trust, we need to be honest about what the limits of politics are

    With just over 6 months to go until the next General Election, one would expect there be to a lively debate across the political spectrum mapping the key battlegrounds of the election campaign over the coming months and presenting some of the major policy ideas of each party. Instead there appears to be a general mood of helplessness among both the Conservatives and Labour. Numerous commentators have highlighted a fundamental disconnect between the political class and the electorate; an insidious […]

    Read more →