Alex Ferguson gives Alex Salmond the hairdryer treatment

17th December, 2012 11:36 am

After Alex Salmond attempt to restrict the amount that Scots based elsewhere in Britain could donate to the Scottish referendum campaigns, Alex Ferguson gave Salmond a dose of his world famous “hairdryer treatment”, saying:

“Eight-hundred-thousand Scots, like me, live and work in other parts of the United Kingdom. We don’t live in a foreign country; we are just in another part of the family of the UK. Scots living outside Scotland but inside the UK might not get a vote in the referendum, but we have a voice and we care deeply about our country.”

“It is quite wrong of the man who is supposed to be leader of Scotland to try and silence people like this. I played for Scotland and managed the Scotland team. No one should question my Scottishness just because I live south of the Border.”

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  • Eck (…and Nicola) have a point. The referendum has nothing to do with English residents or voters, so if Fergie is a English resident, he’s ‘out of the game’ on this one. I’m a Scot living in England too, but all I can do is assist wherever I can to comrades North of the border who want to fight the god-awful No campaigners….

    • Of course it’s to do with us.

      It’s part of our country – the UK – that the Gnats are trying to separate off.

  • cynicalhighlander

    He should stick to football as that is all he knows about.

  • franwhi

    Alec Ferguson is a long running opponent of further Scottish devolution or independence and is quite happy with the status quo in Scotland despite the fact he’s not on the register to vote residing at the moment outside the constituency. In fact, he’s something of a poster boy for the Better Together campaign even though he resides outside the constituency.
    However, it’s not his £501 tokenistic donation that’s the problem nor the fact that he resides outside the constituency – it’s the fact that the SNP could never hope to match the spending power of three opposition parties who have a UK rather than a Scottish spending base. Whatever the result of the referendum it cannot be based on the ability to spend money otherwise the Tories would win every election across the length and breadth of Britain. Is that what Labourlist want ? Or only what they want for Scotland ? Sir Alec should consider this before he blows anymore hot air

  • John Ruddy

    And cue the cybernats!

    The real point here is that the YES campaign want to stop Scots living in England from contributing to the campaign, but are happy to take money from “patriots” living abroad. I presume they mean the Bahamas…..

    In all previous referenda, campaign contributions were allowed from anywhere in the UK – including the one on devolution in 1997. Why should this be any different? What about all that Euro Lottery money?

  • John Ruddy

    So, by your own rules you should shut up and not donate any money.

    Oh, I see! Its one rule for you and another for the No campaign!! I should have realised….

  • Pingback: Better Together’s Morality Vacuum | National Collective()

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