Latest polling shows Labour AHEAD on the economy

January 15, 2013 10:50 am

Many Labour writers and commentators have written recently that Labour needs to improve its position on the economy, as recent polling has shown us increasingly falling behind the Tories.

However when YouGov asked on Sunday and Monday which political party would best handle “the economy in general”, Labour was in fact ahead of the Tories (albeit marginally), by 29% to 28%. Here’s the data as a graph:

economyyougovjanuary14th

 

Economic credibility is still a big concern for Labour, and will need to improve before 2015, but this polling suggests that the polling isn’t as bad for Labour as some might have imagined.

(Labour also led on Europe, Taxation, Education and Unemployment. the Tories led on Law & Order and Asylym & Immigration)

  • johnproblem

    I reckon even Mickey Mouse would be ahead of the Tories on managing the economy….

  • Redshift1

    I’ve always said it’d be madness to abandon the Keynesian analysis. Stick to our guns.

  • John Ruddy

    We’ve been neck and neck since the Budget. One month we are in front by a point (as in October 2012), one month they are.

  • aracataca

    Excellent. Public opinion is shifting away from the idea that the Tories are the party of economic competence (they never were!) and Labour needs to capitalise on this, perhaps by being more assertive about exploding the myths that the Tories (and LibDems) have been allowed to get away with for so long.

    Admittedly that’s not easy because of the Tory bias in the media. However, many people remember how bad things may have been for them in the 80s and 90s, as opposed to relative affluence during the Blair/Brown years. They are also losing patience with the idea that everything is somehow the fault of the Labour government. They may also have noticed that the economy was improving before Osborne got his grubby mitts on it, and also that there was a worldwide crisis which couldn’t possibly have been entirely down to Brown and Balls.

    The Tory targeting of Balls is particularly stupid, since he was in Education from 2007. It may be backfiring as well, since Balls’s forecasts have been proved right.

    And Osborne has never apologised for slandering Balls over Libor. Can’t imagine the media would have been very impressed if the boot had been on the other foot …

    • Alexwilliamz

      Bottom line remains that all parties have proven themselves far worse at ‘running’ the economy than they claim. We need to construct a credible policy to counter the Tories race to the bottom economic state of nature narrative in which we are in some kind of fight with the bric economies. A start would be direct get action to achieve energy security as this will give us a base to insulate against fluctuations and will begin to give advantage to home goods vs imports. The big idea is that we should not be trying to out china china, but instead focus on our strengths before they are lost or emasculated through a one dimensional education system. We should be looking at expanding production of goods for the home market, feeding this should be an international profile focussing on innovation and creativity. We need to capture every penny including production income from new ideas, while the initial patent protects, then throw it over to others to exploit while we have already moved on.

      • AlanGiles

        Spot on Alex. For example I heard on the BBC yesterday that Britain, where Graphene was discovered and developed at Manchester University (albeit by two Russian scientists), we hold 54 patents, whereas China and other countries have hundreds.

        Yet another reminder, not only of the fact that great and important things come out of universities other than Oxbridge, but of how short-sighted we are.

        I was lucky enough to be of the generation that, while we only went to secondary modern schools (in my case leaving at 15) we had the opportunity to get on because of wonderful Technical Colleges, which gave the less academic amongst us a chance to learn when school had ended for us, helped us find (dare I say it? ) careers (only politicians and entertainers talk about “careers” these days – politicians merely talk about ordinary people in terms of “jobs” and keeping people “occupied” as if they were lavatory cubicles), gave us support and inspiration – we had wonderful tutors, and even if they didn’t speak like Brian Sewell, they were craftsmen and engineers. If I were an education minister I would look into reintroducing them.

  • aracataca

    This blog is well worth a read. It challenges the lying rubbish about the economy that’s been trotted out by the government and its supporters.

    http://alittleecon.wordpress.com/2013/01/11/countering-myths/

  • MrSauce

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