Tories select Golliwog book publisher and paranormal investigator as an MEP candidate (AGAIN!)

31st July, 2013 4:37 pm

Back in 2011 we told you all about Rupert Matthews, a Tory MEP candidate who was about to replace the equally troubling Roger Helmer as a Tory MEP for the East Midlands when Helmer retired. (Instead, when Tory HQ decided that they didn’t want Matthews to be an MEP – understandably – Helmer threw a strop and defected to UKIP).

Here’s Rupert Matthews with David Cameron:

Cameron Rupert Matthews

As we revealed at the time, Matthews is the editorial director of “Bretwalda Books”. You may remember them from Tory conference 2011, when they came to prominence after our friends at Political Scrapbook flagged up a pamphlet they had printed, featuring a “golliwog” on the cover.

Earlier, Jon Worth had noted some of the topics  on which Matthews is happy to be a speaker, including:

Yeti! – Are the legendary man-apes of the world real?

Worth also noted that “this is a man who compares the EU to the USSR on ConservativeHome, and – among the 150 books he claims to have authored – the summary of Can Britain leave the EU? A Warning from History states “We might yet see the panzers in Parliament Square”. The things he posts on Twitter are equally bizarre.”

Perhaps best of all, Matthews presented this video on “Our Paranormal Universe” for the “International Metaphyisical University”:

Today, the Conservative Party have reselected Matthews as a candidate for the European elections. We look forward to his candidacy with real interest…

  • Phil Hartup

    Honestly, I would rather have oddball politicians standing for elections instead of guys who spent their entire adult lives never saying or doing anything of interest for fear that it might one day impact their electability.

    We have a sterile, disconnected and fantastically tedious political class in this country, who bear little or no relation to the hodgepodge of fantastic weirdos that make up the British public.

    This bloke may be wrong about stuff, indeed, it sounds like he’s wrong about a lot of stuff. But can we focus on the stuff that’s wrong? (in fairness, you have done to an extent, which is commendable, but really should be the totality of the criticism)

    By the way it seems pretty harsh to single him out for a book on Yetis in a country that still has a state religion. Are we really going to play that card, of mocking people for irrational belief systems? Until somebody gets a blurry photograph of God legging it up the side of a mountain this guy is on more solid ground with his belief system than a lot of MPs. And that’s assuming he’s pro-Yeti.

  • markfergusonuk

    By any available measure Phil, Rupert Matthews is “out there” as a candidate for a major political party

    • Phil Hartup

      Oh definitely. He’s clearly a long way from the accepted norms of major party politics. I just don’t like seeing that described as a failing in and of itself. Especially when he probably has many more legitimate failings in his politics to consider. Let the man stand or fall based on his politics, not the extent to which he considers the Yeti to be a worthwhile area of study.

      The wider the net we cast for politicians in this country the better politicians we are likely to end up with, that doesn’t just mean more women, minorities and different age ranges, it also means people who don’t fit the profile of a traditional politician. We need to more people to want to be in politics. I mean look at the mess we’ve got in power now, when it comes to casting nets it feels like most of the cabinet came out of the same rockpool, how’s that working out for us?

  • Brumanuensis

    “Honestly, I would rather have oddball politicians standing for elections”

    I think there’s a distinction to be observed between ‘oddball’ and ‘racist’.

    “But can we focus on the stuff that’s wrong?”

    You mean apart from publishing pamphlets featuring racist imagery?

    • Phil Hartup

      There is a distinction between oddball and racist, and yes, if he’s putting out pamphlets with racist imagery then that is more than fair game. I have no problem with criticising political positions and I think it’s fairly clear that this guy has many objectionable political positions. They don’t even let you into the Tory party without a bunch of objectionable political positions. It’s kind of their thing.

      So having said that, why are people having a pop at this guy for writing about Yetis, or ghosts, or whatever else he does? Which from the sound of it seems to be the least objectionable thing he’s done recently. There is plenty of perfectly valid politics to hit this guy with, why does it need to be personal?

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