Alistair Darling to step down? Perhaps not…

27th December, 2012 10:07 am

The Sun reports this morning that Alistair Darling may step down at the next election, with the paper this morning quoting a “Senior Labour source” saying:

“Everyone expected Alistair to become Chancellor again if we win the next election. But he’s let it be known that he isn’t planning on standing at the next election. It’s a surprise, but it looks like he may already have made his mind up.”

Which sounds odd, as for starters few people who could genuinely be considered a “senior Labour source” would be caught dead speculating about future cabinet positions in a national newspaper two and a half years before an election.

Interestingly, there was a swift response in the Scotsman, with “friends of Mr Darling” denying that the former Chancellor had made any decisions:

“At some point in the next few months, all MPs will be asked by the party if they want to stand again. Alistair has not made any decision at the moment. This sounds like a Christmas party story.”

Quite…

  • AlanGiles

    ““Everyone expected Alistair to become Chancellor again if we win the next election”

    Really?. I wonder what Mr (and Mrs) Balls thinks about that!

  • Michael Green

    That senior Labour source wouldn’t happen to be a friend of Ed Balls would he?

  • milliboot

    Looking at the shadow front bench, its a big “if” !

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100001102865655 John Ruddy

    I suspect its more linked to a move to destablise him as head of the No Campaign….

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100001102865655 John Ruddy

    I suspect its more linked to a move to destablise him as head of the No Campaign….

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100001102865655 John Ruddy

    I suspect its more linked to a move to destablise him as head of the No Campaign….

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100001102865655 John Ruddy

    I suspect its more linked to a move to destablise him as head of the No Campaign….

  • telemachus

    Darling is so yeasterday’s man that we must welcome this. I heard him with Ken Clarke debating economic plans for next year and he sounded like a spent Tory.
    Ed “build for growth” Balls has the right message.

    • jaime taurosangastre candelas

      Ed Balls has a terrible track record from when he was actually in a position to influence British economic policy, from about 2002-2010.

      Now he has another fairytale after his last fairytale resulted in terrible economic damage. “We will borrow lots of money and spend it, because that is what Keynes says we must do”.

      A pity he did not remember the other part of Keynes’ “wisdom” of profligacy in recession, that of saving in the good times. Nor does he ever acknowledge that the percentages of deficit spending that Keynes advocates are about one quarter of what is now advocated by the Mr Balls – itself a mark of how grossly overspent were the “good times”.

      Ed Balls is a liability for Labour, and if Ed Miliband had any sense, he would cut his political throat.

      • JoblessDave

        Mr Balls’ terrible track record also extends to off the record briefings and his part alongside the feted “forces of darkness” has previously been noted.

        He is also, by a uncommon coincidence, part of the “Senior Labour” team

        Just sayin’, is all.

    • jaime taurosangastre candelas

      Ed Balls has a terrible track record from when he was actually in a position to influence British economic policy, from about 2002-2010.

      Now he has another fairytale after his last fairytale resulted in terrible economic damage. “We will borrow lots of money and spend it, because that is what Keynes says we must do”.

      A pity he did not remember the other part of Keynes’ “wisdom” of profligacy in recession, that of saving in the good times. Nor does he ever acknowledge that the percentages of deficit spending that Keynes advocates are about one quarter of what is now advocated by the Mr Balls – itself a mark of how grossly overspent were the “good times”.

      Ed Balls is a liability for Labour, and if Ed Miliband had any sense, he would cut his political throat.

  • Amber_Star

    Alistair Darling won’t decide anything until after the 2014 referendum so it seems pointless to speculate before then. As to “Everyone expected Alistair to become Chancellor again if we win the next election…” Isn’t that a give-away right there?

    Nobody I know expected him to be Chancellor in an Ed Miliband cabinet; the ‘cuts worse than Thatcher’ interview rather put the lid on that, did it not?

  • Amber_Star

    Alistair Darling won’t decide anything until after the 2014 referendum so it seems pointless to speculate before then. As to “Everyone expected Alistair to become Chancellor again if we win the next election…” Isn’t that a give-away right there?

    Nobody I know expected him to be Chancellor in an Ed Miliband cabinet; the ‘cuts worse than Thatcher’ interview rather put the lid on that, did it not?

  • Amber_Star

    Alistair Darling won’t decide anything until after the 2014 referendum so it seems pointless to speculate before then. As to “Everyone expected Alistair to become Chancellor again if we win the next election…” Isn’t that a give-away right there?

    Nobody I know expected him to be Chancellor in an Ed Miliband cabinet; the ‘cuts worse than Thatcher’ interview rather put the lid on that, did it not?

  • Amber_Star

    Alistair Darling won’t decide anything until after the 2014 referendum so it seems pointless to speculate before then. As to “Everyone expected Alistair to become Chancellor again if we win the next election…” Isn’t that a give-away right there?

    Nobody I know expected him to be Chancellor in an Ed Miliband cabinet; the ‘cuts worse than Thatcher’ interview rather put the lid on that, did it not?

  • Amber_Star

    Alistair Darling won’t decide anything until after the 2014 referendum so it seems pointless to speculate before then. As to “Everyone expected Alistair to become Chancellor again if we win the next election…” Isn’t that a give-away right there?

    Nobody I know expected him to be Chancellor in an Ed Miliband cabinet; the ‘cuts worse than Thatcher’ interview rather put the lid on that, did it not?

  • Amber_Star

    Alistair Darling won’t decide anything until after the 2014 referendum so it seems pointless to speculate before then. As to “Everyone expected Alistair to become Chancellor again if we win the next election…” Isn’t that a give-away right there?

    Nobody I know expected him to be Chancellor in an Ed Miliband cabinet; the ‘cuts worse than Thatcher’ interview rather put the lid on that, did it not?

    • JoeDM

      But it is that sort of realism that Labour must listen to.

      Balls is living in an economic cloud-cuckoo land.

  • JoeDM

    He is one of the few Labour politicians to have a realistic view of the current economic problems.

  • llanystumdwy

    One of the very few associated with new Labour worthy of any respect.

  • franwhi

    The Scotsman trying to destabilise the NO campaign ! LOL The Scotsman newspaper is the No campaign.

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