Eastleigh: Who’s in the running to be the Labour candidate?

February 11, 2013 11:19 am

As we reported on Saturday, John O’Farrell has announced his candidacy for Eastleigh – but he’s not the only candidate. Interviews are taking place to whittle down the longlist to a shortlist for selection tomorrow – and there are several strong candidates in the running. Here are those we know about to far (in alphabetical order):

UnknownJohn O’Farrell is an author and broadcaster – best known in Labour circles for his book “Things can only get better”. He grew up in Maidenhead, where he stood as Labour’s candidate in the 2001 General Election (which was the subject of the BBC documentary Losing My Maidenhead). O’Farrell has also published four novels, and was a writer on both Spitting Image and Have I Got News For You, as well as being a former columnist for both The Independent and The Guardian.

darren paffeyDarren Paffey is a Labour Councillor for Peartree Ward in nearby Southampton. He’s also a lecturer in Spanish and Linguistics at the University of Southampton. He has lived in Santiago, Chile where he also taught English and researched bilingual education policy.

carolinepennCaroline Penn has run a small business, Penn-Gray Ltd for 7 years, providing web design and development to a range of top tier clients. From 2011 she was Hove CLP Secretary and then an elected Executive Committee member of Brighton, Hove and District Labour Party. Up until recently she was also Central Hove, Adelaide and Brunswick Branch Secretary – and she is now Chair of Brighton Co-op Party

andrewpope Andrew Pope is a Southampton City Councillor for the Redbridge ward, which is an urban fringe ward like many parts of neighbouring Eastleigh. He was a union representative and negotiator for Amicus (now Unite), is part-way through PhD research in co-operatives and mutuals in public services, is a member of the University and College Union (UCU), and is Chair of Southampton’s Health Scrutiny Panel. Councillor Pope has had family connections with Eastleigh since young, with family working at Ford and Pirelli, and used to work in Eastleigh himself in the IT industry.

sarahrabbittsSarah Rabbitts is a communications professional who has worked for the BBC and as a consultant for six years. She’s a new member of the Vauxhall Executive Committee and a local Labour campaigner. She only became a active member 18 months ago – however, she has been writing about key party issues in Labour Uncut and supporting campaigns including One Billion Rising. Sarah studied at the College of Law in York and the University of Manchester – and grew-up in Surrey, the North-East and East Anglia.

We understand there are more longlisted candidates. If you are one of them, know who they are or have more information on any of the candidates – email us

  • Chilbaldi

    interested to see who the other candidates are. And why does this not appear on the home page? I was only able to access this article through the link on twitter.

  • NT86

    Mark Latham would be an interesting candidate. It would certainly show up those mouth breathers who try to claim that Labour is “anti-business” or how it plays “the politics of envy blah blah blah”.

    Seriously though the voters would be do Eastleigh a major disservice if they elected Maria Hutchings. No more cranks in Parliament, there’s already enough of them.

Latest

  • News “What would you call it?” Nigel Farage defends use of racist term by UKIP candidate

    “What would you call it?” Nigel Farage defends use of racist term by UKIP candidate

    Nigel Farage has defended the use of a racist term used by a UKIP candidate – who had to resign after his bigoted comments were uncovered. Kerry Smith, the party’s candidate in target seat South Basildon and East Thurrock, had been caught using homophobic and racist language in a phone call, and resigned as PPC on Sunday night. In a statement, he said that he wanted “to see the real issues discussed that touch the lives of people” – but […]

    Read more →
  • Featured An election pledge card of two halves?

    An election pledge card of two halves?

    So far Ed Miliband has revealed two of Labour’s General Election pledges – first was a commitment to eliminating the deficit, which was quickly followed by a second on immigration. These pledge have been broadly supported by LabourList readers in our weekly survey this week, and that’ll be good news for Miliband and his team as they begin go think about their Christmas break, as these pledges were always likely to be the most contentious and hardest to sell to Labour […]

    Read more →
  • News Salmond hints at giving support to a minority Labour government

    Salmond hints at giving support to a minority Labour government

    The SNP’s convention says that it’s MP will not vote on English laws. However, former SNP leader, Alex Salmond has said they might be willing to put this to one side, to support a minority Labour government if no party wins an outright majority next year. In an interview with the Independent, Salmond explained “I would lay odds on a balanced parliament. “That’s an opportunity to have delivered to Scotland what we have been promised.” Giving the example of two […]

    Read more →
  • Featured News LabourList readers back Miliband’s pledges

    LabourList readers back Miliband’s pledges

    Last Thursday, Ed Miliband made Labour’s first election pledge, Conor Pope gave us the low-down of what this meant.  Effectively, Miliband said Labour would reduce the deficit but noted that a next Labour government would do so while securing the future of the NHS. Labour is long portrayed as the fiscally irresponsible party, and this speech saw Miliband try to rectify this mischaracterisation. So we wanted to know what LabourList readers thought about this pledge. The news looks good for the Labour […]

    Read more →
  • Comment There’s more to Higher Education than the REF

    There’s more to Higher Education than the REF

    Yesterday, British universities were in a spin. The result of six years of stress and anxiety, management pressure and absurdly bureaucratic language is out. We know the REF scores. We know, in other words, the numbers that every university department in Britain have been given for the quality and impact of their research over the last six years. The REF dominates university life. It decides appointments and shapes the way university managers treat staff – many hire research ‘stars’ at […]

    Read more →