Yvette Cooper: “Nick Clegg revealed how little he understands violence against women this morning”

June 20, 2013 12:17 pm

Nick Clegg has come under fire after he questioned whether or not images showing Charles Saatchi attacking his wife Nigella Lawson showed a “fleeting” exchange. Unsurprisingly, many people have pointed out to the Deputy Prime Minister that there’s no such thing as “fleeting” domestic violence. Here’s the video of Clegg’s “fleeting” comment:

In a statement this afternoon, Yvette Cooper has slammed Clegg’s failure to condemn this kind of violence against women:

“Nick Clegg revealed how little he understands violence against women this morning. Far too often violence against women is dismissed as fleeting or unimportant. Too often public institutions don’t take it seriously enough. Domestic violence is still a hidden crime – and victims suffer or are ignored as a result.”

“Mr Saatchi has accepted a police caution for assault and the images from the restaurant are disturbing.”

“Ministers should show they are prepared to condemn this kind of violence against women and that they recognise the seriousness of domestic abuse. Nick Clegg completely failed to do that this morning.”

  • http://new-boiler-cost.co.uk/replacement-boiler-cost.php Jon Davies

    First let me say I am not in any way seeking to defend domestic violence.

    Whilst I am not a fan of nasty Nick Clegg I think this is a cheap shot from Yvette. Seeing one still picture of an incident cannot possibly enable you to sum up what has happened. That was what Nick Clegg was trying to say. That you can’t make a decision on whether to intervene or not based on a fleeting glance at a still picture. In my view he was not referring to a “fleeting act of domestic violence” but that the image we saw was “fleeting”. A big difference.

    As a football fan I have seen incidents at full speed and made a judgement. When I have the benefit of more camera angles and slow motion replays I can often change my mind on what I thought I saw. Nick’s biggest mistake was to answer a hypothetical question badly.

    Yvette, stand up for victims of domestic violence at every opportunity. But don’t damage your credibility by distorting the words of others and putting your own interpretation on it.

  • trotters1957

    Saatchi took a caution, the photo’s and his confirmation that they were arguing don’t need any interpretation. Saatchi admitted this in exchange for the police dropping a prosecution.
    I would have liked the police to have prosecuted him for threatening behaviour and / or assault.
    He got away lightly, Clegg is such a buffoon.

  • charles.ward

    I’m no fan of Clegg but he seems to be doing the right thing by admitting he doesn’t know the full details so he can’t comment.

    To imply that he doesn’t care about domestic violence because of this is absurd and I’m surprised Yvette Cooper thought this mud would stick.

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