5 beautiful London homes that definitely aren’t garages that Myleene Klass could buy

18th November, 2014 1:07 pm

Last night Ed Miliband was on ITV’s The Agenda. A fellow guest – Myleene Klass, millionaire former pop star and TV presenter – appears to have taken a dislike to the Mansion Tax, saying:

“For me, it’s so disturbing – the name in its own right: ‘mansion tax’. Immediately you conjure up an image of these Barbie-esque houses, but in London, which is where 80 per cent of the people who will be paying this tax actually live, have you seen what that amount of money can get you? It’s like a garage.”

In 2009, Klass reportedly had a fortune of £7.5 million. That means she can almost certainly afford a home worth in excess of £2 million (if she doesn’t already) and pay the Mansion Tax. But we didn’t want Klass to be too downhearted. A London home worth in excess of £2 million isn’t a garage at all. In fact, we’ve dozens of beautiful London homes – all of which are priced at £2 million – for Klass to look at. Here they are:

6 bedroom detached house in Hadley Wood (near Barnet) with 5 bathrooms, 5 reception rooms (including a Drawing Room) and it’s “situated within an exclusive private gated close”

Klass House 1

Verdict: Not a garage (but it has its own double garage)

2 Bedroom Flat on Chelsea Harbour with riverside viewsKlass 2

Verdict: Not a garage, but who needs a car – you can arrive by boat!

4 Bedroom detatched house in Woolwich – which was formerly the Royal Artillery Commandant’s residence. It has “mature gardens”

Klass 3

Verdict: Not a garage – it has off-street parking, but it does have a tree house

5 Bedroom house in Greenwich – a historic Grade II Listed home originally built in 1676

Klass 5

Verdict: Not a garage, but it has a garage. And a courtyard. And a portico (whatever one of those is)

6 Bedroom house in Eltham – it clocks in at 5180 square feet, and has a roof terrace and a swimming pool (naturally)

Klass 4

Verdict: Not a garage – but it does have “multiple garages”

And since Klass thinks London is full of £2 million “garages” – here’s the most expensive garage we could find to buy in the capital. It’s in Knightsbridge, it has “fantastic transport links”, and it’ll set you back £225,000 (or £1,775,000 less than the Mansion Tax cutoff) – Pure and Simple – it’s a bargain…

chpk4065403-4

If you want to help Myleene pay the Mansion Tax, you can donate to a JustGiving page for just that.

To report anything from the comment section, please e-mail [email protected]
  • David Battley

    It is, I feel, brave to be drawing attention to a discussion in which a reality tv star appeared to best a seasoned carer politician in popular debate.

    • reformist lickspittle

      No, this piece is “drawing attention” to the transparent ridiculousness and utter fatuousness of her “comments”. No surprise you loved them, though 😉

    • Politicians have these moments all the time. Klass was rude, ignorant and dishonest. If a politician interrupted and talked over somebody like she did the politician would be criticised for not listening and having bad manners. Miliband is polite and considerate of others. That is a strength not a weakness.

      • David Battley

        Absolutely it is, but nevertheless it is not helpful in a pre-election state following a bad week of “whispers”…

    • Graeme Hancocks

      No, it shows her “arguments” – if you can grace her comments as such a thing – to be ridiculous. She is a spoilt out of touch b rate celeb.

    • Dave Postles

      I’m sure that she will appreciate your demeaning her. I expect that she’d quite like acknowledgement as a classical pianist and presenter on ClassicFM.

      • David Battley

        Indeed she is all of those things, as well as a model and a mother. Perhaps you consider my referring to her in summary as a “tv star” demeaning somehow?

        Curiously you appear to raise no concerns about some of the genuinely harsh language (“bimbo”, “motor mouth” etc.) elsewhere on these comments to belittle her and defend Mr Miliband.

        • Dave Postles

          No, you called her a ‘reality tv star’.
          Secondly, I haven’t seen those other comments, having been away for some hours. I find them repulsive. OTOH, that does not exonerate your concentrating on one ‘popular’ aspect of her career to make your point.

          • David Battley

            Hmmm. Honestly I don’t really see your point. Is “reality tv star” a form of denigration for you? It was not intended as such, merely the mechanism through which most people will have come to recognise her.

            Nevertheless, if I’d said “novel prize winning physicist” my point would have still been relevant in discussing a debateof a person with a politician who uses debate as their favoured form if daily activity: it should be like racing go karts with an f1 driver.

            That it was not is a genuine surprise.

          • Theoderic Braun

            What the heck is the “novel prize”?

          • David Battley

            Ha! Good spot… Writing on my phone using Swype I am sadly prone to such auto correct errors such as carer vs career and novel vs Nobel.

        • Dave Postles

          My apologies – I marked up the comment which mentioned ‘bimbo’, although I speed read it and missed it.

    • Danny

      Parliament would be a much better place if we had more politicians from a carer background.

      • David Battley

        Good point! I’ll keep the typo in place in the perhaps vain hope that it inspires someone, somewhere…

        • Danny

          I normally hate people who resort to pointing out typos in discussions, so I do apologise, but as it presented the opportunity to make a legitimate point I couldn’t resist.

          • Ian

            So do I. I hadn’t even noticed the typo when I read it, but great response!

  • Kirsty

    Best? Hardly. No wonder Ed looked confused, she was talking out her backside. In fact her backside would have probably made a better argument… this one is an absolute gem: ‘When you do look at the people who will be suffering this tax, it’s
    true a lot of them are grannies who have had these houses in their families for a long, long time.’

    • David Battley

      But he didn’t manage to correct her, did he? Nor did he manage to bring the audience along with him by restating his position. Twitter is hardly a conclusive medium for drawing such a conclusion but it doesn’t look good, and it could seen to raise serious questions how he could perform “under pressure” against the likes of Putin or Kirchen…

      • reformist lickspittle

        Ah, concern trolling again I see.

        Why don’t you just join the Tories and be done with it?

        • David Battley

          Such anger… from where does it stem, I wonder.

          • Michael Murray

            From the Tories’ completely unnecessary and cruel austerity and the effects of neo liberal market economics.

          • Tom Sanders

            Michael, what do you think would happen if the UK govt implemented 8.8% spending cuts over two years?

          • Guest

            So, oh, stopped pension spending? Or what? Please be specific!

            The UK is, of course, looking down the barrel of deflation now.

          • Leon Wolfeson

            Tories?

            Labour is signed up to Austerity.
            Labour is neoliberal.

        • Leon Wolfeson

          Because it’s a good Labourite view these days.
          Sadly.

      • By the same token Putin would eat Clegg and Cameron for dinner.

        • reformist lickspittle

          As, indeed, he does.

          Who genuinely thinks that Vlad regards blustery, transparent ex PR-man Hamface with anything but contempt.

          Those who have bothered to go behind the MSM demonology and find out what Ed is *really* like will know he is a big fan of both the Roosevelts. It might well be that Teddy’s aphorism of “talk softly and carry a big stick” is highly apposite here.

          • Michael Murray

            Yes, I’ve never understood why the right wing media lackeys try to present the fact that Ed opposed his brother for the leadership as a negative. Surely it was the epitome of all those concepts such as freedom, choice and competition that the Right are always promoting? Ed’s action in opposing David shows he has tenacity of will and nerves of steel. Just the qualities we need in our leader. That’s why the Right and their media lackeys are so terrified of him.

      • CoolJHS

        Well actually he did. He said anyone earning less than around £40K can defer the payment until the property is sold. He also told her only 0.5% of properties falls under this tax; in other words it’s not little old grannies but you wouldn’t expect a buffoon has been pop star to understand that sort of thing. Did you even watch the piece? I guess not!!!

        • Tom Sanders

          So you accumulate debt to the state which is collected from your estate (irrespective of whether it was above the IHT threshold) upon your death.

          Klassy.

          • CoolJHS

            Which part of when you sell it don’t you understand? If you die then the IHT will kick in and deal with that, very simple really.

          • Tom Sanders

            Oh yes you did say sell, sorry. But it was on death too? Or did I get that wrong? Anyway there is stamp duty when you buy, MT when you sell. Suppose that’s Klassic predistribution

          • CoolJHS

            True but there is also a thing call a council tax which is based on the value of your property.

          • Dave Postles

            … which these people have been avoiding because of the absurd Band H.

          • Dave Postles

            Stamp duty is about, I presume, legal protection for your property rights through the state authenticating your documents.

          • Tom Sanders

            Eh? It’s a transaction tax. That’s all. 15K if you buy a 500k property. 9k if you buy a 300k one.

            Perhaps Land Registry fees you’re thinking about.

            SD you can escape by not moving. Its punitive levels help to limit supply and hence push prices up. Still, you can avoid it (apart from FTB that is). Can’t avoid MT (or may be you could if you did the Miliband deed of variation thing, who knows. Minefield)

          • Dave Postles

            Stamp duty is paid to authenticate your documents and to provide state assurance of those documents. The Land Registry wasn’t introduced until 1925 and it has only slowly come to comprehend the entire country.

          • Tom Sanders

            Come on. It raises revenue. Was discussed in parliament recently. Under 4bn in 2001. Approx 10bn this year. It’s a cash cow and the govt themselves say exactly this.

          • Dave Postles

            If you want the state to authenticate your documents and assure your property rights, then you have to pay. If the price of your assets is inflated, too bad.

          • Tom Sanders

            Its official name is Stamp Duty Land Tax. It’s a tax. It raises revenue. Just like petrol tax, air passenger duty, insurance premium tax…..

          • Dave Postles

            Stamp Duty was levied on all sorts of documents, but was abandoned for the others and retained for legal documents.

          • Tom Sanders

            Clue is in the name.

            If a tax has that sort of value increase over the years you know it’s wrong. We can say for sure it hasn’t dampened prices, just gone on to people’s mortgages. Treasury pimping.

            In fact I contend prices would fall if it were reduced because the market would become more liquid. More supply, pressure is downward. Who knows, the overall tax take might be unaffected.

            Anyway, not going to happen

          • Dave Postles

            It’s still paid for the authentication of the documents by the stamp. It’s about the assured stamp, which is the equivalent of a seal. In the realm of asset price inflation, the stamp is inconsequential. Estate agents take 1.5% and solicitors’ fees are not minimal. Asset prices have not risen because of the stamp duty. What’s that about more supply – are you now diverting it to housebuilding?

          • Tom Sanders

            Dave, I’ll bear all that in mind when the bloke comes round melts his sealing wax.

            One does not have to use an est agt. One can shop around for a solicitor or some mortgage providers do conveyancing for free. Mine did and it was very good. One has no choice on SD. Except to stay put.

            I didn’t say asset prices had risen because of SD increases and cliff edges. I said it’s too expensive and reducing it would exert a downward pressure on house prices. I believe that to be true.

            Building is something else. I wasn’t talking about that. I simply said that a more liquid market means there is more supply for whatever there is in that market.

          • Dave Postles

            We’ll agree to differ. Sealing wax was replaced by shellac seals in the 18th century as wafer seals which were replaced by embossed seals. I doubt that reducing stamp duty would have any appreciable impact on the housing market. House prices where I live have risen at a compound rate on average of 3% p.a, over the last 25 tears since we bought our house. London is bonkers.

          • Leon Wolfeson

            So you contend mansion prices would fall? Okay. Back in talking about normal housing…

          • Michael Murray

            House prices never fall. If they did you’d be able to buy a bungalow today for six or seven hundred pounds as you could in the 1930s. So much for your wonderful “market”. The only way that the housing crisis is going to be addressed is by the state building homes for the people to rent on a massive scale thus circumventing all those greedy, grasping builders who are only interested in producing Jerry built houses for vast profits or sitting on land because it is increasing in value.

          • Tom Sanders

            They fell 1988 – 1996 and after the 2008 crash. Ok there are loads of microclimates in the latter case.

            So… I’m in tech/computing. Dave is retired from education, GG is bearings factory. Michael, what to you do for a living?

          • gunnerbear

            DP, stamp duty is a tax. Nothing more, nothing less.

          • Dave Postles

            Mansion tax is a poor idea, propagated by the LibDems. The better approach would be to introduce higher bands for council tax – band H is completely daft. The only reason for the Mansion Tax is for the money to be collected by the Treasury, not local government.

          • Leon Wolfeson

            Complete nonsense. We’re not short of mansions.

        • David Battley

          Correct: I am relying on secondary sources to gauge the public reaction, rather than applying my own confirmational bias.

          • gunnerbear

            DB, I know people – from all political colours – who are against the mansion tax….not because they own mansions……but because they think that sooner or later ‘Northern Councils’ will say, “Hey….this MT is a good idea but round here we don’t have any £2m+ houses…….we want the start band brought down to £350K……..” Incidentally, in the area where I live, even £350K would be considered very, very high….I’ve had a scan on a local Estate Agents website……and could only find 4 houses that would be above £350K so you can bet in my area….the starting band would be reduced further. It’s almost as if Ed knows (as does HMG) that CT bands need to be reworked but they don’t have the stones to do it…….

          • Michael Murray

            When any attempt is made to reduce the wealth of the rich they always respond by warning that it will reduce the wealth of the poor too. And when the poor complain that the rich are benefitting from their impoverishment,, as in the case of the bedroom tax, the rich always laugh at the poor and tell them they have no common sense. The rich want it all. That’s why they are rich,

          • gunnerbear

            I take your point on board, but I argue I was pointing out the general cynicism about the idea that the MT bands would – over time – only get the very rich….. ….local politicians in poorer areas would soon start to salivate and demand a ‘suitable MT’ for their area…….

          • Guest

            So you’re claiming you’re a local politician, as you as usual are describing your plans – raising tax on the poor.

          • gunnerbear

            Let me give you one example of my thinking – HMGs of all types let the higher rate band for income tax stay at around £40K – so more people fell into it….if the higher rate band had moved with inflation, it should be around £78K. Do you think nurses, teachers and soldiers and policemen on more than £40K are rich?

          • Guest

            No, you have one colour, purple.And your reworked plan is what, flat-rate? A poll tax?

            And well yes, but this article is about the UK, you might have noticed. And he probably doesn’t have your gall stones, but what does that have to do with anything?

        • Michelle

          I thought Ed did really well. A lot of right wing spin as usual.

          • Matthew Blott

            Michelle, I’ve read your posts and you always think “Ed” did well.

          • paul oxley

            And you always think the opposite

            So whats your point boring Blotty?

          • Matthew Blott

            I haven’t heard that since school.

            My criticism of Miliband is pretty restrained “Interesting” Oxley.

          • Michelle

            Have an upvote in exchange for a chuckle.

          • Michelle

            I generally am happy with Ed, though I can be critical too. This is a
            comment I posted last month “An increase to a measly £8 an hour by 2020. A freeze on child benefit. A freeze on public sector pay. How does this all fit in with the cost of living crisis Eds always banging on about. The inconsistency is painful. No wonder attentions swung toward the NHS.”

          • Matthew Blott

            Fair enough, have an “up” vote 🙂

          • Michael Murray

            Are you the same Mathew Blott who posts on The Lib Dem Stooges site, Lib Dem Voice, predicting the demise and dissolution of the Labour Party?

          • Matthew Blott

            No, you’ve made that up. I don’t think I’ve ever been on that site.

          • Michael Murray

            I’ve obviously made a mistake. My apologies.

        • Matthew Blott

          I watched it and his response was lacklustre. Politicians are understandably weary of alienating voters by appearing angry or indignant but sometimes there’s a place for a more forceful response. When Klass talked about taxing her glass of water it was the time to tell her she is talking crap.

      • CoolJHS

        “Nor did he manage to bring the audience along with him by restating his position”

        Really, wasn’t the audience clapping after the lady called Alison pretty much admitted the mansion tax was needed and Ed succinctly pointed out the contradiction in her position.

      • Matthew Blott

        No he didn’t. It was frustrating listening to Klass squealing while Miliband waffled on.

      • Leon Wolfeson

        Negotiating with Putin is a sign of weakness to Putin’s eyes in the first place, so there would be absolutely no difference…

    • Michelle

      I just pointed out in a comment on the telegraph that the much vaulted klass revealed herself to be self serving and greedy. The mature response…go and boil your head you lefty troll. You’ve got to laugh!

    • Michael Murray

      Yes. Millionaire objects to Mansion Tax. Surprise, surprise!

    • Monkey_Bach

      “… grannies who have had these houses in their families for a long, long time.”

      Only if the grannies have incomes of £40,000 a year or more.

      Our own dear Queen won’t have to move I assure you.

      Eeek.

  • MrSauce

    Is Ed’s house up there?

    • Tom Sanders

      MT won’t affect Ed. He’s very wealthy. And there were all those shenanigans with the family house and legitimate tax avoidance.

      • David Battley

        All tax avoidance is legitimate. If it is illegitimate it becomes tax evasion. 🙂

  • I am going to cast a disparaging remark here and that’s aimed the silly motor mouth of this woman called Myleen.This old radical poet has never heard of this singer until now and she rants on about a subject she knows FA about. The NHS is being run down on purpose by this far right fascist junta, ready for the big sell off.I am old enough to remember what my country was like BEFORE the NHS was created by the Labour party in 1948 and in those dark days before our NHS was formed we had doctors(mainly Jewish in London) cycling around the streets collecting their two shillings and sixpence as their weekly payment for health insurance.Myleen rants about stinging those who live in the land of luxury and the mansion tax labour would hit them with, it comes across that SHE is one of these over paid singers who would have to pay, well missy tough luck on you and I hope Ed uses the Nationalization Act to take back the “family silver” that “Maggot Thatcher” stole from the people and use the revenue to bolster the NHS. Myleen your grasp of recent history is appalling and my advice to you is to shut your trap when its plain to see you know sweet FA on the subject…PS..won’t be buying her records in a hurry

    • MrSauce

      In what sense ‘overpaid’?
      Anyway, houses are just one form of wealth.
      How about civil service pensions?
      These are tremendously valuable – how about putting an envy-fuelled punitive tax on that form of wealth, rather than people’s homes?

      • Dave Postles

        Civil-service pensions: taxed at 40-45% presumably over the personal allowance. My occupational pension from lifetime of work in local government and HE is well within the standard rate. Now, there is a real point here: tax relief on private pensions at the higher rate.

        • Leon Wolfeson

          His point wasn’t about private pensions, was it though?

          Don’t give him any form of legitimacy for his attack on pensions, make it a separate post.

      • Dave Postles

        How about more council tax bands above band H?

      • Leon Wolfeson

        Ah yes, go after those evil, evil people who still might be able to retire.

    • charles.ward

      … in those dark days before our NHS was formed we had doctors(mainly Jewish in London) cycling around the streets collecting their two shillings and sixpence …

      Why mention that the doctors were Jewish? Nevermind, I think I already know.

      • Michael Murray

        The doctors my family used in those days in London were Irish, Jewish and indigenous English. My grandmother told me that very often doctors did not take payment from poor patients but used their rich patients to subsidise their practice. The cultural identity of the doctors was irrelevant as long as they were good doctors, then as now.

  • Orson Cart

    Mylene Krass perhaps should be reminded that it was the Tories who privatised water and increased the VAT tax on her glass of water and Labour who reduced it.

    • Ian

      Water is VAT exempt.

      • Leon Wolfeson

        Mineral water is not.

        • Ian

          I didn’t know the evil Tories had privatised mineral water – do the French know?

          • Leon Wolfeson

            Heh – As far as I know it’s always been subject to VAT, as a luxury item.

  • Theoderic Braun

    While the poorest of the poor are being driven from London by the Bedroom Tax it’s hard to fell much sympathy for people who are wealthy enough to be hit by Labour’s proposed Mansion Tax, who, at the very worst can move to a home valued at less than £2,000,000 if they want to avoid said tax.

  • MrSauce

    Good on her for wanting taxes to be justified.
    How about using the current tax take more effectively for a change?
    Just mumbling ‘NHS’ as an excuse for appropriating ever more of the product of a worker’s labour doesn’t cut it.

    • Tom Sanders

      Lord Tony of Parsons has spoken

      Myleene Klass is a working single mother who knows more about the real world and supporting a family than Eds Miliband, Balls etc ever will.

      — Tony Parsons (@TonyParsonsUK) November 18, 2014

      • Danny

        Yeah, I found that hilarious as well. I presume you quoted it for comedy purposes?

    • paul oxley

      Grow up troll…The NHS is the most efficient Health Care System in the world already

      • MrSauce

        So why isn’t 40.5% of everyone’s earnings enough?

        • Dave Postles

          According to my tax summary, the NHS accounted for 19% of my tax contribution. I don’t pay NI as a pensioner, but I really feel that NI for pensioners should be introduced.

          • Leon Wolfeson

            If you’re working, then yes.

            Basically, if you work you should pay NI. Regardless.
            Also, there’s absolutely no justification for a lower upper rate of NI.

          • Dave Postles

            Nope, not working for money. OTOH, as IFS points out:

            ‘Over a third of the remaining £12.5 billion gap is down to higher
            spending on pensioner benefits. Combined spending on state pensions,
            pension credit, and universal pensioner benefits such as the winter fuel
            payment will be £5 billion higher in 2014–15 than in 2010–11. All of
            that increase is explained by the rising cost of state pensions. To some
            extent this reflects an ageing population, with the number getting the
            state pension up 400,000 over the period. But it is mostly the result of
            higher spending per pensioner, with each recipient getting nearly £500 a
            year more on average. This was, for the most part, planned – as each
            new cohort of pensioners retire, they benefit from past decisions giving
            them more generous entitlements than previous generations.’

          • Leon Wolfeson

            NI is an in-work tax. People should certainly not have favourable income or capital tax treatment because they’re retired, but that’s another issue.

            Also, this is another reason I support a Basic Income – the whole issue goes away.

        • paul oxley

          Because the 40% covers everything including Trident and all the Private Parasites bleeding the Welfare budget dry like Serco, A4E, Atos etc not just the
          NHS which has come top in every independent study of healthcare for value for money

          Dont post again if you dont want to be
          made to look foolish…Unlike Ed I dont
          go easy on right wing idiots

          • MrSauce

            So it is probably fair to ask for some improvement in spending priorities, or at least an explanation. Especially to a full-time politician who thinks he should be Prime Minister.

          • Dave Postles

            What’s wrong with Labour’s explanation that there is a funding gap in the NHS which needs to be filled?

        • Theoderic Braun

          Earnings do not reflect the wealth of an individual who may be asset rich but cash poor; taxes should be based upon the individual wealth of citizens rather than their earnings alone.

        • Leon Wolfeson

          Keep talking about how low the UK tax burden is (even when you get it wrong, as ever).

    • Guest

      No surprise you’re against the NHS and tax on the rich, as you demand more be done with less.

  • charles.ward

    No matter how nice they might be I wouldn’t consider a 4 bedroom house or a 2 bedroom flat a “mansion”. Sure, the’re not garages either, but that was clearly hyperbole from Klass.

    The point is you could buy houses like this outside London for much less than 2 million. In some areas you could buy a real mansion for less than 2 million.

    This is not a mansion tax, it’s a London tax.

    • Dave Postles

      That’s the consequence of asset-price inflation and QE. Let’s hope that the proceeds are used to build social housing for the cleaners of Ms Klass and some contributed to Centrepoint for the homeless young.

  • Monkey_Bach

    Something like two thirds of voters support the Mansion Tax.

    https://yougov.co.uk/news/2013/02/21/majority-support-mansion-tax/

    Based on what Myleene appears to have said on The Agenda I would imagine that she’s probably one of the one in three that doesn’t. Can’t win ’em all. Still, all in all, the Mansion Tax seems a very popular policy and a vote winner for the Labour.

    Eeek.

    • Leon Wolfeson

      And that doesn’t count people like me who oppose it as a clumsy kludge compared to fixing the base system.

      The real surprise for me back when it was published was the support for a wealth tax, actually.

  • paul oxley

    Ed should have destroyed the bimbo but I suppose he thought humiliating a has been pop star on Tv was beneath a man certain to be Britains next PM

    The more the Griffs and Myleenes moan about this policy though the more Labour will pick up voters who see whining millionaires as something that any decent Labour government should be creating

    Hope they both leave Britain..the more rich Tory celebs to do so the better as far as most ordinary Brits are concerned

    • Michelle

      I thought Ed handled it well. He was polite and respectful but fought his corner. She looked ridiculous.

    • wobble

      It wasn’t beneath him , but beyond him !

      • paul oxley

        Says no doubt a debating genius posting anonymously under the name er….wobble

    • Ian

      I find your use of the term “bimbo” sexist and offensive. If you cannot win the argument without being abusive then your argument is weak.

      • paul oxley

        Better? ……yep Better!!

        Her argument was weak..she was clearly just using terms like Fiscal drag that she had read in her Daily Mail to try and suggest that many people could end up paying the tax when it has been stated clearly that the
        policy applies to 2 million pound homes and that the 2 million amount will rise with any house price inflation so that anyone not subject to the tax on introduction will.never be subject to it…..Suggesting otherwise was just ignorant scaremongering on her part or to get much needed publicity for her career which is in freefall

        • Ian

          Just as well Ed demolished her argument then, isn’t it?

          Don’t lower yourself to UKIP levels.

  • Sunny Jim

    More time ‘on-air’ the MT gets the better.

    There seems to be a misunderstanding about its role. It isn’t meant to be a solely revenue generating idea.

    We need ‘our’ voters to understand that after 5 years of being hammered by the coalition the boot will be on the other foot under a Labour government.

    BUT – the only way you will see the rich being forced to cough up is by getting out and voting next May.

  • Tinkerbell

    Thank god Elizabeth Bowes Lyon is dead just think what she would have been asked to pay. Oh I forgot they won’t be paying it.

    • Tomleslie

      George VI and his wife Elizabeth did so much for our country in the Second world war and it wasn’t forgotton. Trite remarks about people who weren’t responsible for their who and when they were born, or lived helps no one.

      Not even hapless Ed who just happened to be born to a marxist intellectual, who avoided tax on his estate.

      • Guest

        So in fact you’re the one making the trite remarks and being unhelpful.

        As you see magical marxists. Ignoring the Neoliberals.

  • politicocoa

    Sorry, but “no wonder Ed looked confused” isn’t a defence of a supposed future prime minister. Why, given these “facts” as set out in this article, was he so afraid to take her on? For fear of a tabloid headline that he was mean to a celeb? Why did he apologise for the fact that no one likes paying tax, and rather pathetically say he’d at least try to spend it a bit differently in justification? The problem is clear: Labour has lots of policies that the voters really like, but a leader totally incapable of articulating them with any conviction. I don’t doubt that he believes them, but what a pathetic lack of confidence in his own belief system this was. If it’s a myth that grannies are living in these big homes as in the article, or that garages go for that much, he ought to be saying how few would be affected, and he should have gone into this interview properly prepared, knowing Klaas (and Sir Christopher Meyer’s) political viewpoints and London property situations – that he didn’t says a lot about his choice of media team too. Such a shame that the Labour party is too cowardly to dump him and increase the chances of winning this election for the people who so desperately need them to win

    • David Battley

      Harshly put, but I find myself nodding in agreement with your central point.

    • Leon Wolfeson

      I don’t see how not having a leader by the GE would really help.

      And which group of neoliberals is that then?

  • Michael Murray

    Yes. Millionaire objects to mansion tax: surprise, surprise!

  • 07052015

    Poor effort from ed,labour policy is clear on fiscal drag and that asset rich income poor grannies pay on sale of the property.

    See alexander called for a mansion tax yesterday -obviously he is scared stiff of losing his seat.

    There is no need to be rude to marlene,just say that any of her fans north of watford must think she lives on another planet.

  • treborc1

    This is Findlay in Scotland:

    Fighting for the power to set a statutory Living Wage for Scotland
    and in the meantime using every power we have to make sure our
    workforce is fairly paid.

    An education system free from financial barriers – that means
    college, vocational and university places based on ability, not
    ability to pay.

    More funded childcare places so no one has to make the calculation
    whether they can afford to work or not.

    Fighting for the abolition of Trident while investing in defence
    diversification and a new industrial strategy to protect jobs and
    create new ones.

    Bringing our railways back into public ownership.

    Ending the privatisation of the NHS and working at a local level
    to renegotiate costly Private Finance Initiative (PFI) deals.
    This would get me signing up for labour, but I still see missing anything about the welfare state which is under massive pressure from English Labour and the Tories.

    But now look at the offer from labour it’s about winning voters with one off tax on the rich with a mansion tax and if the following year all £2 million houses are unsold not that a tax of what £2,000 would stop people.

    The fact is once this tax is paid that’s it, what we need is a council tax which keeps on paying for people with piles of money.

    But to be honest Miliband is asking for Farage and Cameron to come on TV and debate with him well if he debates as he did on this program got help him.

    the same question how will labour fund the never ending rise in costs for the NHS.

  • RWP

    In fairness, the MT will hit people regardless of income. You might be cash poor and yet still get lumped with a huge bill every year, which is patently unjust.

    • Guest

      Ah, another great argument for low tax on capital – “you have this great asset, so you’ll not be taxed much. But those nasty people making cash? Oh no, they pay lots of tax”.

      You’ve patented injustice, not the same thing at all.

  • Grouchy Oldgit

    People like that wouldn’t vote labour anyway, so stop wasting time and focus on policies for real people.

  • Reb

    klass must have gone off the radar, she’ll do anything for publicity. surprised she didn’t lobby Geldof for a spot on the new Band Aid single join the rest of the self promoting back slappers. oh thats right, she can’t sing can she? what DOES she do anyway?

  • ClearBell

    What I want to know is what Labour proposes to do with the selling off our public housing to do Westbrook and the like? In London the idea of “affordable” housing is surely considered a completely empty phrase – with neither the quantity available in new build projects being enough and the cost being impossible for most of us to manage on our stagnating wages.

  • Tom Sanders

    From GF comments:

    The lefties are attacking because the panellist is a millionaire and lives in a London home worth upwards of two million. Someone had best tell them he’s called Ed Miliband.

    Well made me laugh

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