Labour to launch “The price of Tory failure” campaign online and in marginal seats

13th December, 2012 12:38 pm

Labour will roll out the next phase of their fightback on Osborne’s welfare/tax credits trap today with a combined digital and doorstep campaign called “The price of Tory failure”. A website has been launched and will be accompanied by a leaflet (below) that will go out in the marginal seats we outlined yesterday, where the number of families receiving in-work tax credits is greater than the Tory majority. The party sees winning the argument on the ground in these constituencies as being crucial.

The campaign will focus on personal, real-life example of those hit both by cuts and the Tory failure to grow the economy and create jobs. The party are also doubling down on Ed Miliband’s attack line from PMQs yesterday – that the people getting hit are people Osborne “will never meet and whose lives they will never understand”.

The decision to link field, policy and press on this issue highlights what Marcus Roberts noted on LabourList yesterday about the growth in joined up campaigning from the party.

Here’s the leaflet:

frontpagetoryfailure

backpagetoryfailure

  • http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=100001116515833 Michael Carey

    Ugh. This plays into the ‘strivers’ / ‘shirkers’ narrative and into the Tories’ hands. We should not be accepting the strivers and shirkers dichotomy even if it is to argue that the Tories haven’t been faithful to it. Of course they haven’t, that is not where the real class division lies, so let’s not pretend that it is.

  • NT86

    The picture on that flyer makes me sick. In a snapshot, it sums up the attitude of these two snake oil salesmen. Hearing the Tories talk about “strivers” and “hard working families” so cynically shouldn’t mislead anyone. Worse than Cameron and Osborne are backbench rentagobs like Priti Patel whose rhetoric just beggars belief. It’s simply a ruse to divide and rule the lower and middle income households. Labour’s been accused of instigatating class warfare in the past. In some respects they did, but this lot are no better when it comes to that (perhaps worse)!

  • AlanGiles

    I think it needs to be said – many people who are out of work, are, not because they don’t want to work, but through circumstance – be that youth, or age, or disability, or living in an unemployment blackspot. Yet again we have the labour “brains” trying to create a division. Notice the leaflet specifically mentions “strivers”. Many people who are out of work strive to find work, and have to jump through hoops to obtain their JSA. I know becuase I talk to many people in that situation

    I lost count at the number of times Angela Eagle on yesterday’s World At One post-mortem on PMQ (Radio 4) kept coming out with that hacknyed phrase “people doing the right thing” (i.e. in work) “Doing the right thing” is obviously the new “One nation” or “for the many not the few”, and like all catchphrases becomes pointless and threadbare very quickly. My eyebrows raised also when Eagle gave a lecture on “demonising welfare claimants”. I didn’t notice her complaining when Frank Field, John Hutton, Blair and Purnell did the same thing many many times between 1997-2009.

    • aracataca

      This comment as usual is all focused on Labour who have committed themselves to oppose Osborne’s proposals and they have also challenged Osborne’s spiteful little myth about people walking past drawn curtains. In fact Angela Eagle called this little analogy ‘poisonous’ in the Radio 4 interview. Who’s in government Alan?

      • AlanGiles

        Bill, making allowance for your bitter little jibes, the point I am making is that if it is “poisonous” for the Conservatives to make unfounded allegations about the unemployed, (which of course it IS, just to save you making another silly little post) it was EQUALLY poisonous for Labour to do the same thing when they were in office – especially as the 2009 Freud reforms were so enthusiastically embraced AFTER the 2008 downturn was already reflecting on employment prospects.

        I am afraid I am very sceptical about Labour’s apparent change of heart – and it took several days to decide whether or not to oppose Osborne’s cuts, which should have been a no-brainer makes you even more sceptical.

        It reminds me of 1996 all over again – when Gillian Shepherd introduced JSA Blair and his pals thought it beyond the pale – they soon changed their minds when they came into office, and indeed made Mrs Shepherd’s “harsh, unfair” (Blair’s words, not mine) even more stringent.

        I am afraid, like most things in politics these days, it’s just a game – a strategy and the ones who get hurt are the ones who can least afford it.

  • http://twitter.com/Ceilidhann Kayleigh Anne

    They should have used the laughing Osborne photo from the Autumn statement. His callousness continues to surprise me.

  • http://twitter.com/purpleline peterb

    Also would like to add , but doubt it will get printed they were laughing at Ed Balls.

  • PaulHalsall

    350,000 out of DLA according to the Daily Mail today.

    That calls for political action.

  • PaulHalsall

    350,000 out of DLA according to the Daily Mail today.

    That calls for political action.

  • PaulHalsall

    350,000 out of DLA according to the Daily Mail today.

    That calls for political action.

  • PaulHalsall

    350,000 out of DLA according to the Daily Mail today.

    That calls for political action.

  • PaulHalsall

    350,000 out of DLA according to the Daily Mail today.

    That calls for political action.

  • http://twitter.com/waterwards dave stone

    Cracking response from Labour!

  • Pingback: Labour’s upside-down approach to the benefits trap | Winstanley()

  • Pingback: Exclusive: Tory Online Campaign in Battleground Constituencies Highlights “Hardworking Families v People Who Don’t Work” - Guy Fawkes' blog()

  • Pingback: Labour’s upside-down approach to the benefits trap | bangorlabour.org.uk()

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